Skip to main content

Full text of "Town Topics (Princeton), Feb. 05, 1976"

See other formats


IVol. XXX. No. 49 



Thursday, February 5, 1 976 . 1 5'" At AH Newsstands, 

Seeking Life-Style with Regard for Nature and P eople 

vironment," smiles Fran Benson, Community village otters a perfect 

Princeton school-teacher and toun- set tj nq 

der ot a sub-group within Com- „ A|S0 we wou|d snare .. in (ac , 

munlty Alternatives devoted to we are sharing right now - ways to 

working out practical alternatives to reduce consumptlon ," Ms. Benson 

the usual round ot life most people continueS] a nd Ms. Morgan em- 

,ol l? w .„. phasizes that the goal of an Alter- 

Community living? Well, no. na(jves Cemer wou | d be a , ow stan . 

"I think one reason not more is dard of |jvj .. in , erms , con . 

done co-operatively, speculates sumption _ bu , a nlgn s , an dard in 

Ms. Morgan, "is that a lot of people , erms o( personal re iations. and 

fear the radical step of moving in community [ ife . 
with another family. It doesn t have As a sma|| s|ar , members o) Ms, 

to be like that at all. Benson's group have suggested 

The kind of community Ms. Ben- usj c|o(h na p klns jnstead of pa per 

son has in mind, she says, would of- ones re . cyc | jng lne garbage, 

fer its members support in illness, keeping the thermostat! at the 62-66 

co-operative arrangements for child de e eliminating the use of 

care and care of the elderly, a cans wa|king or bikjng in _ 

sharing of ideas, a sharing of s,e a d of driving, eating less meat 
problems. Both Ms Benson and Ms Morgan 

Ideally, members would live ,, h when (ney begin t0 ta | k , ike 
within biking or walking distance of (b | S 
one another One observer has 

pointed out that the new Princeton _ ■" "" ""'"' 

' Zoning Board Rejects Sale of Township School Building for Offices Page f 

1 Loop Bus in Both Municipal Budgets Through May Page 3 i 

t PJ&B Production of "1776" a Big Crowd-Pleasei Page2Bf 

2 Tiger Quintet Returns to Ivy Race after Loss to Rutgers PagellB \ 



Alternative Community of 50 



A way of living, a life-style, 
somewhere between society as we 
know it today, and a hippie com- 
mune. 

That's what a group of some 50 
men and women are working 
toward, as they gather for a con- 
vivial pot-luck supper these chilly 
Saturday nights. 

The Community Alternatives 
Center — the "Center", physically, is 
telephone space at The Whole Earth 
Center - started small last fall, after 
someone at Princeton Friends 
Meeting visited the Life Center 
Community in Philadelphia. 

"Why not here?" was the prompt 
question. 

Basic guidelines for an Alternative 
Community for Princeton would be 
regard for the environment and 
regard for people, says Judy 
Morgan, young research assistant 
at ETS who is one of the original 
"Alternatives." 

Translated, this means devoting 
equal time and thought to offshore 
drilling for oil and what's the best 
way to care for great-grandma. 

"There IS a community between 
how you react to one another and 
how you feel about the en- 



VALUES 



contemporary 
furniture 



National Bank. 

furniture clearance center 



YOU SAVE CASH! 

DAVIDSON'S 

SUPERMARKETS 

172 NASSAU ST. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2002 with funding from 

Princeton University/Princeton Theological Seminary 



http://www.archive.org/details/towntopicsprince3049unse 



THE 
ORIENT SHOP 

Oriental Gift Specialties 

15 WitherspoonSt. 

924-5438 

Minute Press 

D nnceton Shopping Center 

921-7434 



Proposal to Convert Township School Building 
To Office Use Is Turned Down by Zoning Board 



James Laughlin, real estate real estate values in uk die 

toMtaft oublic "gyO-in^but a beneficial same, couldXp HeWd'tnl 

SV^fc -ii i . P effect lf AUas moves int0 this board that when real estate 

■^•JFJSI 8 '° «"»«" building. You'd have an oc agents in town 'wer?^ 

cupant with an image, an proached by the school board 

Board, at l rtiv ^ u ?. aD i. wh .° fEUJSS* 5^ could f '< lhink of . an yone 



Need a New 

MATTRESS, 

BOX SPRING? 

Stop and test 

Famous King Koil 

Spinal Guard 

The support is firm, yet 
very comfortable. 



Twin: 
Full: 

Queen set: 
King set: 



239 
329 



$99 
119 
299 
419 



Available fo 
mediate delivery 



m 



j 



nleriori 

162 Nassau 924-2561 

Princeton. N J. 

Wed. nite 
'til 8:30 



The empty brick building ( 



empty for a while 
The Township Zoning «cjp'ani' „„ 

nl meSSS S appearance, and the building who would want to buy' the 

z: s £ A rr no ,' "° sssa & ■ifiry; ar buuding for any 

&£M2&g£ — «*-*ri- It was suggested that a 

thereforastaffofl, ~ -- -j- gRgg""* 

Atlas, through its president, board members and from tad n't set $160 000 as the upset 

Edward R. Farley Jr., 188 S Stockman lawyer far P" ? Mr C °° k fflid il was *• 

Parkside Drive, promptly a group o7re™dent loonis ne [^ al J«PO™bility of a school 

announced It would carry an sak of CbuMin^ far ofS ^lV° ^^ *? WgheSt 

appeal to Superior Court Mr Lauehlin said ih™ S Possible price 

Winthrop Pike, president of »»XXXK ESS' 

b h o e ard Ch h°asnryet S dec,d h ed ^W^fe'M v 

» %n7 ^ ft Sl^^T ^T*. US 

formally, has agreed to extend H.™H^ J " S h„Ti n ,l!l e il 1 iL ar g ued that actual costs of 

Mr. Farley's 

building. He 

purchase it from the school 

board for $201,000 



FtealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRealEstate 



it placed on the 



DRAINE 

REAL ESTATE 



agreed to extend H e told the board the brick ? rguM mat actual cosls of 
option to buy u;e buUdin^'was taTouid 'con" ^/TuUdTng "hadn't Ten 
had offered to dition, and said it would be a £L„ U iLT t L, h ? d ," ' „ b 5f.? 







a shown, and that Atlas hadn't 

XJ U ho C use befool boarl i^-WWvS 

tSJTtSSntiTJSSi omcesTilrSaifSL 6 '""""test^dea. for the 

offices in the residential zon! guX -- dem^fshed ^e faT^ ^^Boar^'i? 

would impair the zoning plan lot wouldn't bring much on the ^id be a substantia 

and be a detriment to the market because it's helnw the w0 . ula ?■ a substantial 

neiehborhood 1V.-5 j « 5? "- detriment to the pub he good to 

•As taxpayers wed all like ?£ =f d h °' h f pr ,°Pf r £ "! aU °w offices there Preser- 

that Sow" 'said Zoning 20 wolor toe deaTedtt Tte ™ g the MaSter Plan is the 

Board member Harriet gfi SdS sutT-sUndarS in b^gicTtoeSnS 

S3S- JSLftW. t SLtTSJIta a J-^^"^^ 
zoning plan variance The area is zoned 
Thomas Cook, school board f or i 5 acres the lot is 9 
counsel, said that if the board acres- 
did join in the appeal, it would 

claim that the Zoning Board Remodelling Costs Hieh 

"abused its discretion" by not AskeTwtot fte buiSine miSht ° f u m, f a PP hcatlon cost * e 
orantino the variance ASKea wnat me Duiiaing might sc h ol board money for 
bring as a residence, Mr. education." He said the school 
SrS 1 ™ 8 ^ •■ ?,° ^ l y board didn't want to impair 



the Master Plan, either, and 
said there had been no 
"nibbles" from anybody in- 
terested in residential use for 
the building. 
Warning that, if left empty, 




Decision Delayed. At the under $100,000 ." It might take 
hearing, held last Thursday $75,000 to $100,000 "to make it 
night and continued to habitable," he estimated. 
Saturday morning because of Mr. Stockman spoke for the 
the lateness of the hour when "quality of life" of his clients, 
it ended, Atlas attorney people who own houses behind 

Gordon Strauss promised the the school in the Winant Road the'"st'ructure°'wouid''bec'ome 
Zoning Board there would be area. To a question from the 
no exterior changes to the board he said, yes, their 
building. Additional screening standard of living was "on the 
would hide the parking area upper side." 

^^and the building from neigh- 

bors, and parking spots near Mr. Laughlin, whose 
the Lawrenceville Road would testimony occupied most of 
be eliminated. Thursday's hearing, said that 



"a Sheehan building with 
walls," in reference to the 
uncompleted office building 
Nassau, Mr. Strauss said that, 
if the good of the community 
as a whole is the question, the 
opinion of neighbors can be 
disregarded. 



RealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRealEstate 



Imported Wine 

in 

Two Liter Bottles 

Folanari 

Soave & Bardolino 

$3.99 

LaReur 

Blanche and Rouge 

$4.69 

Grey Goose 

Ljebfraumilch 

$4.99 

Above prices do not 
include N.J. Sales Tax. 

WINE & GAME 
SHOP 

6 Nassau St. 

Free Del. 924-2468 

Hours 

Mon-Thurs 9 am - 9 pm 

\' Fri 8. Sat 9 am - 10 pm 

I O CjDuu 



IN TOWNSHIP HALL... Irving Goldberg, Com- the Yedlin public housing 

Grants, Traffic, Contracts, mittee's consultant on ap- project and 12 acres between 
In a brief Monday night, plying for Federal block grant Bunn Drive and Mt. Lucas for 
Township Committee rejected money, conferred with playground space, will be 
the lone bid for construction of Committee on the letter he combined in this so-called 
a radio antenna tower for w jh sen d requesting funds "pre-application." Committee 
Township police and will under the Community also decided to re-work the 
advertise again. Development act. Basin Park plans - in the 

A tower will increase police He and Committee agreed to Lower Alexander Road area - 
radio reception, police say, emphasize the need for a to emphasize upgrading of 
and the ability of squad cars to community building at the neighborhood rather than 
communicate with one Princeton Community Village its history 
another. As it is now, one car and for completion of Committee named Mary 
can't reach another by radio if recreation plans across Route Bundy of The Great Road to 
t here's a hill between them 206. Purchase of four acres for the Traffic Safety Committee, 

and agreed with that com- 
mittee's recommendation to 
eliminate the "no-stop, no- 
stand" regulation on the north 
side of Valley Road. "No 
parking" would continue. 

At Committee's regular 
work session next Monday at 8 
p.m., Dr. Goldberg's contract 
will be up for action. Com- 
mittee has proposed to pay 
him $2,200, $500 now, and $700 
when the pre-application has 
been completed If the "pre- 
app" is approved, the balance 
would be paid on the final 
application. If Federal 
authorities reject the pre-app, 
the fee would be held to the 
$1,200 already paid. 

Committee will not meet 
Monday, February 16 because 
of the George Washington's 
Birthday holiday. 



GRANNICKS 

Annual Winter 

RUMMAGE 



• CLOTH COATS 
• DRESSES 

• SUITS • FURS 
•COCKTAIL & 

FORMAL WEAR 

ALL SALES FINAL 

NO REFUNDS - NO RETURNS NO 

EXCHANGES 



UU4MUrJtv 



■ffMwR&ie 



There's plenty of room and comfort 
for your family in this immaculate 
three to four bedroom, two and a half 
bath home in a convenient Lawrence 
Township neighborhood. We are 
most pleased to show this par- 
ticularly fine offering at the reduced 
price of $67,500 

"Serving Princeton's Real Estate 
needs tor 42 years" 

(609) 924-4350 ALWAYS! 

166 Nassau Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 

Member of Multiple Listing Service 
See Our Ad on Page 23 




21-36 



INDEX 

Business in Princeton 
Calendar of the Week 

Church News 

Classified Ads 

Club News . 10B 

EarthNotes 12 

Eng.-Wed 8B 

It's New to Us 7B 

Mailbox 8 

Music in Princeton 5B 

Obituaries 20 

Sports 19, 11B-15B 

'Theatres 2B 

This Is Princeton 1 

Topics of the Town 3 

Weather Box 4 



Take time to smell the flowers. ..HEARTS 
and FLOWERS that is! Your Local Mouse 
is such a sentimental fool and Valentines 
Day is one of those special days here at 
the Country Mouse. 

Stop in and pick a nice card or gift for 
someone you love. 



The Country Mouse 

164 Nassau Street 
MON THRU SAT 9:30 - 5 



My 



: AhemativeCommunitY ''^^»«™&S£™ 

C^uhjMKwCo™ j r that kin( j o( family, 

J "The group isn't really as Alternatives members point 
" solemn as all this would in- out. you learned about 
• dlcate," Ms. Benson smiles relations with people of all 
? "At those pot-luck suppers you ages This is not available to 
| get just about the best food children today 
t you could imagine, and plenty — — 

1 of it The home-made breads Someone to Count On. An 
L and those casseroles! And other family' you could count we f l 
» delicious salads with unusual on, or perhaps more than 
3 combinations of greens..." one, " Ms. Benson muses "My 
J "We want It to be a group own parents had nearby 
» where people enjoy life and relatives to help them, but I 
r havefun," Ms Morganadds have no nearby family As a 

woman alone 

1 Relationship Sought. In fact, find that m 

* one thing Community peoplf — 
-" Alternatives plans to do is to There 
\^, V V &A%$£^W&- U flfc ^Top-^andinvitingwindstonowintothepartial 

^aZ ,e b e, S wt U n ld wo^ S^lSyS '""" "unusual," Mr Ludlum says happily Oddly »e 

L Jnu7 commitnTent to the cold didn't come until about half an hour after the winds hit 

J future of society? How is this different from Princeton at 4:30 At 5 am it was only 30, buy by 8 a.m. it 

* "People tack on that good friends who sustain one was down to 14. It had been 47 at midnight. 

> commitment to the end of another in need? A com- "You seldom have temperatures going down in the mor- 
Z their work-time," Ms Morgan mitment to work at it - that's n j n g wn e n the sun is out, but it went from 14 degrees at 8 to 

§ has found, "and people the difference, Ms. Benson aroun d n r 12 at noon By mid-afternoon, it was back up to 
^ separate work from Uie^reatrf feels^ ^ ^ ^ ^ is or so It was 8, Tuesday morning. 

"Wind-chill ." Mr Ludlum slips on his face mask in 
recollection "If you have a 10 degree temperature and a 20 
m.p.h. wind, it's a factor of 24 below zero. If you've got a 40 
m.p.h. wind, it's 37 below Expose your face in that, and you 
really feel it." 
Very little snow, of course: only an inch i 



'ith children, I 
and more 
situation, 
much isolation' 



Hurricane Winds In a Blizzard 

"It snuck in," said weatherman David Ludlum of Science 
Associates, picking up his barometer from where it had 
fallen to 28.81 "The forecasters didn't expect it." 

"It," needless to say, was Monday's - well, it didn't last 
long enough to be. technically, a blizzard, Mr Ludlum ex- 
plains It was rather like the "ground blizzards" of the far 

est. 

A giddy anemometer atop Mr Ludlum's Riverside Drive 
roof recorded 49 m.p.h. as the highest gust of wind That 
was at 7 a.m. Monday Airports had 50 to 60 m.p.h. and 
there is rumor of a whistling 80 m.p.h. in West Windsor 
Winds are tricky. Mr Ludlum says It all depends on where 
you are. 

The front came down straight and fast from Hudson Bay, 
pouring across the eastern Great Lakes Around 2-1 a.m., it 
formed a new center off the coast, causing the barometer to 



rtth the Sierra Club 



racism, sexism, "age-ism", Anyone interested in belpng iL 
elitism They worry about do so. is invited to call Ms. 
nuclear power plants, they are Benson (921-8332) or Ms. 
curious about solar energy Morgan 1924-5873) evenings. 
and windmills. They would or the Alternatives number at 
like, perhaps, to join with the Whole Earth Center 
people in Common Cause or during the day. It's 924-2597, 
the Sierra Club to set up a and it's symbolically shared 
symposium -- how can the 
goals these people have relate 
to community life in Prin- 
ceton? 

At the moment, the struc- 
ture is fragile, the beginnings 
small. It will be interesting to 
watch Alternatives grow 



Let Us Make 
Your Day! 




■ so. That's 



their lives. You work with one Both Ms Benson and Ms 
group, you have a social life Morgan feel this kind of thing 
with another Maybe your will evolve naturally, as 
recreation - like swimming or Community Alternatives Itself 
paddle-tennis - is with still grows and draws more people. 

another, and you do your 

serious thinking - like church Another sub-group within 

- with still another It seems Alternatives has the rather because the air around Hudson Bay and the Great Lakes is 

tosome of us that there should forbidding title of dry and cold as a martini 

be more overlap with all these Macroanalysis Seminar. The 

parts of life ." name simply means that the _^ 

group talks about large, whole *^ 

Today's families need an issues, examines the way ■MBBM^MiWa*i«WBs« l *BWWBa^a^^^^a" 
alternative to the old extended various parts of life, like the "The primary purpose," Early Awareness. My 

jys a Macroanalysis flyer, eight-year-old," she con- 
is to improve our social tinues, "came home from 
change activities, not just school the other day and said, 
sharpen our mental 'what's going to happen to the 
capacities. Our hope is that world if people don't start 



No more storms in sight for now. But Mr. Ludlum always 



family, in which mom, pop, ecosphere and domestic says a 
grandma and grandpa, an problems, relate to each 



aunt 



two and several other. 



•// 



Mtni if hop 



Vers l an yam 

^nittincf k/orsted 

fainted needle point Idtb 

Discontinued Crewel 

and needlepoint Kits 

V/ / Palmer®ouja*e, 



of 
WtHTER APPARSL 

AND 

£iM£Rl€ S/iCC 

Continues 
at our. 

/VfissAu Street Shop 

And 
HAM STORE 



projects for social change being more careful?'" 

come out of every seminar Ms. Benson says the first 

thatisoffered." time she attended a Com- 

munity Alternatives 

Goals Listed. It is, in short, gathering, when a member of 

a study of the big picture. the Philadelphia Life Center 

Postcards to Key officials Community addressed about 

protesting off-shore oil drilling 80 Princeton residents back in 

- that's one. Possibly, an September, she was "im- 

'i organized local boycott of pressed." 

' aerosol spray cans. "These people are trying to 

"Many people feel live the way people will have 

helpless, although they sense to live if the world is to sur- | 

what should be done," Ms. vive, and I'd like my kids to be 

Morgan believes, "This is one raised in an atmosphere like 

way to apply energy - human that," she says. 

energy! - in a way that can be 

fun, and do good somewhere, Who are Alternatives 
too." members? 

"If you're training Teachers, a carpenter, 
children," Ms. Benson adds, librarian, an engineer-turned- 1 
"you've got to consider the artist, housewives, people in 
future of society. I don't see their 20s, but some in their 40s 
» how a money-oriented, and 50s wondering about a , 
™ competitive society can different life style. The men- 
provide for our kids - our women division is about half- 
resources are dwindling so! and-half. 
We must be more oriented They're people who like to 1 
toward the good of society " plant gardens, who are I 
_ thoughtful about reducing! 

Oloiun (SopUB 



the 

.Swedish Aassage Stvdu 

130 Nassau 924-2167 

Men and Women Attendants 



TOBOGGANS 
ICE SKATES 

SLEDS 
SKI RACKS 

ANTI FREEZE 

DE-ICER 

ICE MELT 

CAR BATTERIES 

JUMPER CABLES 

HEATED DIP STICKS 



OUR BICYCLE SALE 
IS STILL IN PROGRESS 



Tiger Auto 

24-26 Witherspoon Street 924-3715 



South Brunswick . 




Telephone 92 a" 1700 



Palmer Square. Princeton. IK J 



Thursday. FeCxuaryS, '976 



Clearance Sale 

EVERYTHING MUST GO! 




Polyester 

Double Knits 

All on Bolts - 60" wide 

Reg. 3.98-4.98 yd. 

1 .79 yd. 

All First Quality 
3 days only: Feb. 5-7 



Kettle Cloth 
solids and prints 

45" wide 
Reg 2.49 yd. 

ALL 1.49 yd. 

All First Quality 



Woven 
1 00% Polyester 
Replaces Wool 

60" wide 
Reg. 4.98 and up 
NOW 2.98 yd. 

All First Quality 
3 days only: Feb. 5-7 



Dacron & Cotton 

Prints 

Reg. 1 .69-1 .98 yd. 

ALL 98' yd. 

All First Quality 



Drapery and Slipcover Remnants 
Values 3.98 to 8.98 49° 



OUR SLIPCOVER AND DRAPERY SALE CONTINUES 



The Fokte (Mm 

Rt. 206, Montgomery Ctr., Rocky Hill 921-2294 
Open Daily 1 to 6; Thurs. & Fri. 'til 9 



TOPICS 

Of The Tou- 11 



RENT FOR ELDERLY? 

Subsidies Proposed. When 
Borough and Township 
municipal budgets are in- 
troduced in both town halls 
next Tuesday at 8 (it's the 
regular meeting for Borough 
Council, a special one (or 
Township Committee), they 
will include $7,500 for each 
municipality for a rent- 
subsidy program for elderly 
tenants Borough Council, in 
addition to presenting the 
budget, will hold public 
hearing on taxi fare and sign 
ordinances. 

The proposal, as blocked out 
by Borough Council member 
Martin P Lombardo, would 
finance the project through 
money anticipated from 
Federal Revenue Sharing. 
The Borough expects about 
$50,000 and the Township 
$56,994. 

Mr. Lombardo suggests a 



subsidy program for either 
housing or utilities for people 
over 62 living on an income of 
less than $5,000 a year Some 
people might qualify for both, 
he indicated. 

A committee, whose 
membership would include 
the welfare directors of 
Borough and Township, 
members of finance com- 
mittees of the two governing 
bodies, representatives of the 
Commission on Aging and the 
Housing Authority, are ex- 
pected to develop a program. 

"It'sa very good principle," 
commented Borough Mayor 
Robert W. Cawley this week 
He suggested the possibility 
that funding might eventually 
come from federal aid or from 
the senior-citizens bond issue 
that was the only issue to pass 
through the New Jersey voting 
machines successfully last 
November In any case, he 
emphasized, the $7,500 is not a 
one-year measure, but a start 
toward continuing aid. 

Mr. Lombardo said, in his 
proposal, that Public Service 
itself has recommended an 
"Energy Stamp" program for 
senior citizens that would 




WRAPTURE! 

All-over print wrap-robe for juniors 
(sizes 7-1 3) in dacron-cotton knit 



Happy 
Valentine 




HIGH HONORS: Judge Theodore Tams, j, 
congratulates new Eagle Scout Richard Chenoweth of 
Trinity Episcopal Church Troop 50 as Scoutmaster 
Robert Wells looks on. Court of Honor ceremonies 
marked the 28th anniversary of the Boy Scout troop at 
Trinity Parish. 

Verbal Assault. A 16-year 
old Princeton girl was the 
target of indecent remarks by 
adriverwhoofferedheraride 
Saturday afternoon fro 
Lawrenceville. 

Police report the girl was 
waiting for a bus on the 
Lawrenceville Road when a 
battered, navy-blue sedan 
stopped and the driver asked 
her how to get to Princeton. 
He then asTted her if she 
wanted a ride into Princeton. 
En route, he allegedly made 
indecent and suggestive 
remarks to her. 

When the car slowed for a 
light at Stockton and Elm 
Road, the girl jumped out of 
the car, police said. The 
suspect is described as 25-35, 
250 pounds, 6-0, round face, 
light brown hair, blue or green 
eyes with a deep voice. He was 
wearing navy blue trousers. 
Det. Boccanfuso is continuing 
the investigation 



Frog *4.50 



Birdmobile 



NOKNCkAFt 



"5.50 



m 



Scandinavian Imports 
356 Nassau St. 924-2777 



work like food stamps. Mr 
Lombardo thinks Princeton's 
program might provide 
subsidy for both utilities and 
rent, in many cases. 

LOOP THROUGH MAY 

Then Metro? Grinding along 
the rocky road toward com- 
pletion of municipal budgets. 
Borough and Township 
governing bodies have agreed 
to finance the Loop Bus routes 
through the end of May. After 
that, buses will take a summer 
vacation and everybody hopes 
Mercer Metro will take over 
the driving when runs resume 
in the fall. 

Agreement has been 
reached between Borough and 
Township on most joint 
agencies, Township Mayor 
Jay Bleiman reported Monday 
night, although the Township 
seems more inclined than the 
Borough to make library cuts, 
for example. 

The joint Planning Board's 
hopes for an in-house planner 
have not been realized. 
Consultants will continue to be 
used instead because it's 
cheaper that way, for the 
moment. It is expected that 
final work on the housing 
study can be done by present 
consultants. 

In the Township, Committee 
scheduled an all-day work 
session for this Wednesday, 
hoping to do the final budget 
arithmetic. 

LIFE THREATENED 
By Burglar. The life of a 
Linden Lane woman was 
threatened last week by a 
burglar who entered her home 
while she was asleep. 

According to police, the 
woman woke up and found an 
intruder standing over her in 
her bedroom shortly after 1 :30 
a.m. He allegedly put his hand 
over her mouth and 
threatened to kill her if she did 
not do what he said. She was 
alone in the house. 

Police said he took $40 from 
the victim's pocketbook and 
two rings before leaving 
through the front door. He 
worea ski-type mask. 

The police investigation 
failed to uncover any sign of 
forced entry into the house. It 
is being continued by Det. 
Frank Boccanfuso and Ptl 
Howard Sweeney. 




NO STATE AID? 
School Board Wonders. The 

possibility - even probability - 
- that Princeton will get no 
state aid at all for its schools 
was raised Tuesday by 
Winthrop Pike, president of 
Princeton's school board. 

If the legislature doesn't act 
and the court reapportions the 
existing monies, Mr Pike 
says, Princeton will clearly be 
a loser. 

This bleak view of the future 
comes after the state in- 
formed Princeton last week 
that it, and other districts. 



STOCK REDUCTION' SALE 



20 to 50% OFF 

Selected Merchandise 

Pants • Cords 
Shirts • Jackets 
IINCET0N ARMY-NAVY 

UVi Wilherspoon Slreel • Cash or Check • All Sales final 




UiinnMiMmmllH 



Yes, knit! So fine you can't even tell. 

Floral print, or floral-patchwork 

in reds or blues 

Robe (short or long sleeves) - $22 

Sleeveless gown - $1 6 



EDITH'S 

8- 10 Chambers St. 921-1 



SPECIAL PURCHASE 

100% Wool 

TENNIS 

Sweaters 

from DEAN'S OF SCOTLAND 

Classic Style 

for MEN [sizes 38-46] 

Orig. Now 

Pullover $28.00 $14.00 

Cardigan 32.00 16.00 

for WOMEN [sizes 36-42] 

Cardigan - Baby Cable in red and green with 

contrast trim of white and navy. 

Originally $28 

Now $14 



114 Nassau St. 




l )24-34 l )4 



%Y boulique 
f ^\ ?no hassau street 



Marsrr&Co. 




Montgomefy Center 
924-7123 





T^WTvAbtn*' 



Gi^Hera Wss 

And then give this one resembling a foil 

wrapped "chocolate kiss" II really doesn't 

matter in which order you present them, 

she'll be delighted either way Ours is in 

sterling silver on a matching chain 

By J &C Ferrara $17.50 

We also have smaller kisses tor little girls at 
$7 50 

Also available in 1 4k gold. $1 80 



hamilte 




TRENTON 

Broad & Hanover Sts. 

Daily 10-5:30 

989-8100 



LAWRENCEVILLE 
Route 1 & Texas Ave. 
Lake Lawrence Plaza 
Dally 10-9; Sun. 11-4 

771-9400 



Topic* of the Town 



must pay 25 percent of 
teachers' pensions. For 
Princeton, that is J194.500 
Such a financial happening, 
Mr Pike says, would simply 
wipe out the schools' surplus 
which amounts to about 
$200,000. 

In action taken at last 
week's meeting after TOWN 
TOPICS' press time, the board 
announced key dates for the 
forthcoming school elections 
Election day is Tuesday, 
March 2 and the polls wilt be 
open from 4-9 p.m. Those who 
wish absentee ballots must 
apply for them by mad, by 
February 24 and in person, by 
March 1 at 3 p.m The 
organization meeting of the 
new school board will be held 
March 9 in Community Park 
School 

CULTURAL CENTER? 

Art Croups to Explore One. 
The possibility of a com- 
munity cultural center where 
Princeton's many art groups 
could gather will be among 
topics of discussion this 
Thursday when represen- 
tatives of community art 
organizations gather at 8 p.m. 
in Borough Hall. 

The meeting, open to any 



The Poef'i Corner 



"Slow' 

The rhyme was especially 
loud and clear Monday mor- 
ning around d. when ihe tem- 
perature began a three-hour 
llighl downward lhat took it 
trom 47 to 17 Winds gusted at 
gale lorce. rain that had (alien 
iroze. and snow coaled the en- 

This winter's weather 
changes rather sharply every 
36 to 48 hours Wednesday. 
the Man said, will be mild - 
temperature readings over 40 
Thursday, snow is possible 
Friday rain is possible. Salur- 
day. sunshine is possible 

As has been ihe case ever 
since ihis somewhat contused 
veaf began, daily torecasls are 
subject to change without 



E.BAHmTCAN&SONl 




NATIONALLY ADVERTISED 
BR0ADL00M CARPETS 

NEW AND USED ORIENTAL RUGS 

Rug Cleaning and Repairing 



883 STATE ROAD 
PRINCETON, N.J. 



orgar 



/.at i 



offering 
ithe 




programs or instruction 
arts, has been called by the 
Arts Council of Princeton. 

"In recent years, so many 
new art organizations have 
developed in Princeton, that 
there is a need for establishing 
a forum so they can better 
serve the community and 
themselves," said Council 
president Anne Reeves, an- 
nouncing the meeting. 

Those who attend the 
meeting will also talk about 
ways to share information, 
resources and ideas about the 
future of the arts in Princeton. 

LEG IS FRACTURED 
By Hit-Run Driver. Lloyd G. 
Parsells, 20, 36 Princeton 
Avenue, was treated at 
Princeton Medical Center for 
a fracture of his lower right 
leg received when he was 
struck by a hit-run driver 
early Saturday morning. 

Mr Parsells told police that 
he had just left a friend's car 
around 2 in the morning and 
was crossing Nassau Street at 
Princeton Avenue when he 
was struck He added that he 
did not see the car before or 
after it hit him, 

Mr. Parsells managed to 
crawl to the curb and call for 
help. He was found by Ptl. 
Gerald Patterson, who took 
him to the Medical Center. 

Hits Parked Car. Last 
Wednesday evening, David A. 
Neal, 24, Apt. 10, Research 
Park, lost control of his small 
foreign car on Witherspoon 
Street near Guyot Avenue 
trying to avoid an animal and 
struck a parked car. Charged 
with careless driving, he was 
treated at the Medical Center 
for lacerations of the face. 

Both Mr. Neal's car and the 
parked car, owned by Frank 
DiMeglio, Millstone Road, 
Cranbury, had to be towed 
away. 

Township police in- 
vestigated two skidding ac- 
cidents during Monday's 
snowfall. 

Eric S Laschever of 39 Scott 
Road, skidded into the rear of 
a parked car on Mount Lucas 
Road around 4 o'clock, and 
two hours later, Katherine 
Garland, 57 Lower Harrison, 
, skidded into the rear of a car 
on Washington Road at- 
tempting to turn onto Faculty. 
The other driver. Max 
Greenberg of Santa Clara, 
Calif, complained of back 
pains. 

"HOLD THE LINE" 
On County Salaries. 
Republican Mayor Robert W. 
Cawley of the Borough has 
been asked by the Democratic 
county Freeholders to 
organize the county's 13 
mayors into the Mayors 
Advisory Council required by 
Mercer County's new ad- 
ministrative set-up. 



Promptly, Mayor Cawley 
asked the other 12 mayors to 
join him in asking the county 
to reach a negotiated set- 
tlement with county workers 
for a 6 percent to 7 percent 
salary increase, instead of the 
8 percent in the county budget 

"A majority'' agreed, the 
mayor reported. His tally 
sheet didn't show exactly how 
many of the 12 joined him. 

"We'll pass this on to the 
Freeholders." the mayor said. 



Research Program in Criminal Justice, Princeton 
University presents: 

Judge Robert Page, Presiding Judge, 
Camden County Juvenile Court 

TOPIC 

SENTENCE AND TREATMENT 

ALTERNATIVES AVAILABLE TO THE 

JUVENILE JUDGE. 

February 10, 7PM 
Stevenson Hall, 91 Prospect Street 

Open to the Public - Admission Free 



Donnelly t Jon 




1 /2 

PRICE 

Entire stock of: 

Winter Outerwear 
Fall Leisure Suits 
Lee Pre-washed jeans 
Sweaters 
Turtlenecks 
Knit Sport Shirts 
Fall Sport Hats 

...now reduced 50% 

Special Groups: 

Suits 

Sport Coats 
London Fog Rain Coats 
Casual & Dress Slacks 
Sport Shirts 

plus unadvertised specials 



Selection limited to current inventory 
so shop now tor best selection. 



2 542 BRUNSWICK PIKE I US ROUTE I I 

LAKE LAWRENCE PLAZA 

TRENTON. N J 08638 TEL (6091 883-5BOO 



On A Cold January Day Planning Begins 
For A Big Event in June - The 23rd Fete 







q Bnnuft'» l » M,t " 



JUNE IN FEBRUARY: It takes a long time to plan anything a* complex at the Prin- 
ceton Medical Center's June Fete, and the two chairmen, Miles Oumont (left) and 
Jane Schowalter, have already been hard at work lor some time now. Each Fete 
has a theme. This Bicentennial year, it's the "Spirited" Fete, end the spirit ol '76 
is emblazoned on the Fete poster at the left. The setting, ol course, Is Nassau 
Hall. 



Cotd and uncomfortable 
under gloomy skies, Princeton 
University's Windsor Field 
was not the place to be on 
January 16. 

But on that day, the first 
steps were taken that will 
transform that barren ground 
into a wonderland of booths, 
games, rides, activities and 
refreshments enjoyed by 
thousands of people of all 
ages It's the 23rd edition of 
the June Fete, to be held this 
year on Saturday, the 12th, 
and the planning and work 
toward that one big day will 
occupy hundreds of men and 
women volunteers from all 
over Princeton and the 
surrounding area. 

Some will be asked to bake a 
pie, others may work two 
hours in the Pizza Tent on the 
day of the Fete. At the other 
end of the spectrum are the 
committee heads who will put 
in hours every day in the 
weeks preceding June 12. 

At the top this year are 
Miles Dumont and Jane 
Schowalter, co-chairwomen, 
who, like the fete chairwomen 
before them, have had several 
years of Fete experience. 

On January 16, they were 
not surveying Windsor Field, 
but relaxing within the 
historic Faculty Room of 
Nassau Hall to promote the 
dedication of thef 1976 Fete to 



Princeton University and the 
town of Princeton "in 
recognition of the significant 
roles both played in the 
American Revolution and the 
beginning of our in- 
dependence." 

"A Spirited Fete," as it will 
be called, will be symbolized 
by a jaunty tiger on a flag field 
of red. white and blue. 

The co-chairmen and their 
committee listened to two 
speakers discuss the roles that 
the town and the University 
played in the events 200 years 
ago. Anne Reeves, chairman 
of the subcommittee on Arts 
and History for the Princeton 
Community Bicentennial 
Committee, spoke about life in 
town during the Revolutionary 
period, while Dean Jeremiah 
S. Finch, chairman of the 
Princeton University 
Bicentennial Committee 
discussed the significance of 
Nassau Hall. 

The secretaries for this year's 
Fete are Jean Breithaupt and 
Jeanne Mather. Treasurers 
are Debbie Shillaber and 
Archie Lummis. Sibyl Groff 
and Lanny King will head the 
Fete Auction, while Theo 
Baxter, Janet Reiche and 
Debbie Stovall will be 
responsible for auction 
solicitation. 

Again this year, Karen 
Savidge and Elsa Soderberg 



will be in charge of children' 
activities, and Donald and 
Sally Wamock will be in the 
communications tent. Friday 
night festivities will be led by 
Jean Cassen and Pat HuTier. 
Mary Ann Linton and Lynne 
Long will oversee the food at 
the Fete. 



Sally Albano and Sue Swartz 
will supervise entertainment; 
Lois Kendall and Virginia 
Reynolds, the Garden Tent. 
John Simpson is the official 
photographer, and publicity 
will be handled by Phyllis 
Marchand, Pete Peters and 
Ruth Wilson. Again in charge 
of the fete program is Pat 
Landmann with Barbara 
Evans and Barbara Maw 
taking care of program 
solicitation. 

Additional attractions and 
their chairmen are : teen alley 
(midway), Carol Caskey, 
Helen Meade, Mary Ann 
Opperman and Adolph Herst; 
raffle, Eva Collins and Joan 
Koether, lane of shops, Serene 
Byrne and Ellen Hendrickson. 
Behind the scenes will be Sue 
Blair and Jerry Reed, 
staging; Ruth Crowley, 
parking and security; and 
Nancy Henkel and Anne 
Humes, linen. 

Decorations for this Spirited 
Fete will be done by Betty 
Cleveland and Emma Wirtz. 




HOUSE OF TREASURE ANTIQUES 




• FROM BOMBAY: Unusual large selection 
of old gramophones 

• FROM JAPAN: Huge shipment arrived loo 
late for holiday giving. So NOW... all items 
offered at 20% OFF. 

• ALSO: 20% OFF on all pictures, frames, 
mirrors, paintings & linen items. 



HUGE SELECTION - GREAT BUYS 

riKmt it hwk ijnnrtinUT 



Route One Circle - Princeton 
Tues.-Sat. 11-5 



Montgomery Shopping Center I olden & Prospect Avenue 

Route 206 & 51 8. Rocky Hill 924-230ol Trenton, N.J. 683-2929 
Mon-Thurs-Fn 10-9; Tues-Wed-Sat 10-5 30 




famous name 
sleep sofas > V 
at low sale price 

Apartment-sized sleep sofa with smart 
upholstered leg styling in a rich rust tone, or beige 
cotton velvet. Opens with ease to reveal a full-size 



, interior 
design 

service 



Consult Stsuu Interiors 



* always cwnpiuneotary < 



llaASau ^rnt 



eriorS '62 **»$«*•< omssi 




Our annual Ski Sale begins 

THURSDAY 
FEB. 5 

with excellent values in: 





SKIS: Rossignol • Olln • Dynastar • Kneissl 
BOOTS: Nordica • Hanson • Kastinger 
BINDINGS: Allsop • Salomon • Look • Besser 
POLES: Scott »A&T 




PARKAS • WARMUPS 

STRETCH PANTS • SWEATERS 

GLOVES • TURTLENECKS 

WINDSHIRTS 

• Head • Gerry • Slalom 

• Skyr • Ernst Engel • Aris 

• Meister •Grandoe •Alpine Design/ 




The above will be reduced a 
minimum of 20% with reduc- 
tions up to 50% on select items 




SPORT SHOP 
1 38 Nassau Street 924-7330 

Mon., Thurs. & Fri. 9-8:30 PM 
Tues., Wed. & Sat. 9-5:30 




COMMITTEE MEMBERS: Urging the public to come to an annual i 5 vent which 
features the many clubs and activities that take place at the High School are (left 
to rightVRob MaAin, Anita Smart, Todd Zapolski, Ellle Ross and Karen Carter. 
Details, this page. 



ACTrviT.ES FEATURED are urged to enroll promptly driving ^^under^e^ 



in PHS Festival. Princeton Sometimes 

Hieh School's Winter Festival enrollment classes 

w U bite" Saturday between completely filled before the in- for s« months 

.„ __j . :_ .u„ o„v. M i aim. n»r«nn rpoictratinti date rive rnnceaun 



was also placed on probation 



JLSi. 4 T& , l?-^SS TSifa's^ection -^^erejmed Monday 

is sponsoring the event which of these classes may be '"borough trattic court tor 

features the many clubs and opened. Those who register by ^^'"tre William M Miller 

activities of the high school. mail, will have their class .J^^Xi™ fined$23 

•■We feel that this will give admission slips mailed to Jr Emmons Drive, fmed $23, 

the public a better un- them. anQ Este „ e p 

derstandingofwhatPrnceton .___„ Gray, 19 Toth Lane, Rocky 

H gh School is really all MOLESTER REBUFF tu „ n] '' h ., h „, ..j Arthl , r m 

about," said Council By School Student. Borough Hdlbot" $17 and Armu^ 

President Todd Zapolski. police are continuing the in- ^ n d d el Z™' G Yokana BTBatUe 

Each organization will have vestigation of a mans attemp ^ n h n e t h$,5 

a booth which will display last week to force a young girl Koaq,Dotn $ib. 

some aspect of its activities, intoacar. (.„„:. , Heeartv 22 

There will be a Bicentennial According to police, a seven- * '" ^_ c ' s Av ^ nu " eg princeton 

display featuring Princeton year old girl was walking on ^™n ^SpS. red "JhT 

HigVschool rnemorabilia Wi.herspoon Street Friday ^M**^.^: 

fcatiT^nd '= SSVmW KSSS^ ^ 

presentations by members of a car stopped near the Public WU, careles s qrivin g. 

the choir, band, and theatrical Library and the driver offered TEENAGER ARRESTED 

productions to take her to school The girl st0 | en Glul in possession. 

Several special foods will be refused. Trenton police notified 

prepared and sold, and there Police said then that the Borough police Thursday that 

will also be many activities for driver got out of the car and tney ^J arreste d Robert 

children. The admission price allegedly tried to force the girl Wood Jr 18 f Leign Avenue 

of 25 cents qualifies anyone for toward the car She ran ahead mi I0und in nis possession a 

a door prize. and reported the incident. 38 caliber revolver that was 

Chief Michael Carnevale allegedly sto len January 10 

OPEN HOUSE THURSDAY declined to reveal what from a witherspoon Street 

For Adult School. Open description police had of the Yame. 

house, offering a chance to car or suspect, saying it would De t. Timothy Huizing is 

learn more about the Prin- hamper the police in- continuing the investigation 

ceton Adult School's spring vestigation being conducted for Borough police, 
session and to meet the in- by Borough Juvenile Officer 

structors, will be held Douglas Watson. Arrested Again. William 

Thursday from 4-6 and 8-9:30 Blackburn, 49, of Mercer 

in the Princeton High School Open Lewdness. Sunday street, was arrested last week 

Cafeteria. morning around 11, a woman a f ter police received a call 

Prospective students who was walking down Chambers that a man was creating a 

have not yet registered by Street when she was con- disturbance in front of the 

mail and who wish to do so in fronted by a man wearing a laundromat on Witherspoon 

person may sign up for the long navy blue coat who Street 

course of their choice at this police said, then exposed According to Chief Michael 

time. Brochures listing the 53 himself Carnevale, Blackburn had a 

courses which cover a wide He was described as 25-30, 5- re d s ki boot in his possession 

interest range have been 11, medium build with brown an d wa s allegedly throwing it 

mailed to area residents and curly hair and wearing dark a t a parked car. He was issued 

additional copies are rim glasses. a complaint summons for 

available at the Public creating a disturbance while 

Library LICENSE REVOKED under the influence of alcohol 

For Driving While and for violating the 

Registration for classes will Intoxicated. Winfield Dix, 38 Borough's anti-noise or- 

continue until the term opens Dodds Lane, has been fined dinance. 
on February 17 Classes are Ml" an ° nad nls " cen se He was scheduled to appear 

filled on a first-come, first- revoked for two years by in Borough court this Wed- 

served basis, and participants Judge Philip Carchman for nesday 




\^?vegotit! 

The great new Hewlett-Packard HP-21 Scientific Pocket 
Calculator. Uncompromising quality at only $100 
O A true scientific calculator with 

32 functions and operations, including 
rectangular/polar conversions, register 
arithmetic, two trig operating modes. 
□ Full display formatting. Select fixed 
decimal or scientific notation with 
display rounded to desired number of 



D HP's error-saving RPN logic system 

with 4-memory stack. 
a Traditional HP quality craftsmanship. 
a New. smaller size. 
D An unbeatable price/performance 

Test the new HP-2I today nghi in our 
store See for yourself how much per- 
formance you can take home for only 



$100 



PRINCETON •? 

36 Unlvmity Plata ^^S^CS 



ALLEN'S 

itdren's Department Store 

134 Nassau St. 
924-3413 

onday - Saturday 9-5 30 



The 

Treasure Trove 

of Gifts 

Boxed Notes 



Topics of the Toien 



Got A Motor Bike? 

What kind of rules should 
the Borough set up for 
people who ride motorized 
pedicyles around town' 

The Traffic Safety 
Committee would like your 
advice and suggestions, so 
you're invited to a meeting 
in Borough Hall at 10 am. 
Thursday, February 19. 

"It's a meeting for 
mothers, I guess,'' said 
Borough Mayor Robert W. 
Cawley. observing the 10 
a.m. hour. 



^LOFTc 



CUSTOM FRAMING 
FINE ART • CRAFTS 
GIFTS • SCULPTURE 
POTTERY • CLASSES 
STOCK FRAMES 



In Stock 
WALL- 
PAPERS 




SAUMS 

Paints & Wallpapers 



Hopewell 466-0479 
75 Princeton Ave. 



WEST WINDSOR LOSES 
State School Aid. A loss of 

$404,043 in state school aid was 
reported last week by 
Superintendent Richard 
WiHever of the West Windsor- 
Plainsboro Regional School 
Board 

The Board has been told it 
will receive $118,141 in state 
aid. The current figure is 
$522,184. Cuts in educational 
programs will have to be 
made, board president 

Richard Snedeker warned the 

audience at last week's toward Nassau Street Ptl 
meeting of the school board, if Peter Hanley and Ptl William 
the final state aid figure is Hunter, on foot patrol 
sharply reduced. Mr. searched the area without 
Willever s proposed budget success, 
represents a 1.25 percent The suspect was described 
increaseoverlastyear's. as about 30, 5-6 or 7, with a 

F r UN S" R ^ 1SER PLANN ED claOlad? anf brown m goU h £p 
H.rH. Hat ^ s Canipaign. Fred and glasses Det Charles 
Hams will bring his cam- Harris is continuing the in- 
paign for the presidency to a vestigation 

chili and beer party in Prin- 

h^ nT , U n day 'JfI' tat ,? atthe ^ employee of the A&M 
«.T SL D . r , and Mrs How a«i Fruit Market, 25 Witherspoon 
Mele 988 Kingston Road. The Street, told police last week 
event will raise funds for the that $300 in cash had been 
Harris Campaign for the New removed from the pocket of 
Hampshire primary February his coat which he had placed 

.. on the back of a chair. 

Advance reservations may A Princeton resident and 
be made by calling Mrs. Mele, member of the Business Men's 
924-9223 or Barbara Wicklund Club which meets at the 
of Neshanic Station, state YMCA lost $350 when his 
coordinator for the Harris locked locker at the Y was 
campaign at (201) 369-4777 or rifled Police said the locker 
(201 ) 561-9494. was not forced open. 

_. The same day - Saturday - 

The voting in New Hamp- a Trenton resident lost $15 
shire is first of some 30 which was taken from his 
Democratic primary contests, locked locker at the Y between 
The primary run for the 5: 30 and 6 

presidential nomination will 

end on June 8 when Monday morning, a woman 
simultaneous primaries are inside the Coin Wash, 259 
held in New Jersey, Ohio and Nassau Street, lost $20 to a 
California. thief who took the money from 

Sen Harris has set as his a wallet inside her purse 
goals a finish among the top which she had put down, 
three candidates in New A Princeton University 
Hampshire and a victory in student was the victim of a 
New Jersey and the other two thief who entered his car 
primaries in June. parked in the Quadrangle Club 

r-^.™ olT^T ' ot > through the trunk, cutting 

GIFT SHOP VICTIM open a relr seat. Taken were 

Of |9I2 Theft. Several an 8-track stereo player and 
bracelets, one valued at $450, spare tire The entry was 
and two rings with a combined reported Friday morning 

value of $912 were shoplifted -_ 

!^A"f*{r°J l > u >e Princeton » 260 Car Theft. Township 

a shop 13 Palmer Sauare. police reported the break-in of 
JLH .1 k , called Police to a station wagon parked in a lot 
report that a man who had off Faculty Road 
been browsing for a half-hour A vent window had been 
had just walked out with the smashed to reach a $150 tape 
jewelry and was headed deck and 12 tapes valued at $60 



from the glove compartment 
Also taken was a tire and rim 
valued at $50. Police identified 
the owner as Peter J 
Clements of Magie Apart- 
ments. 

Four traffic safety 
barricades worth $25 each 
were taken from River Road 
last week at the construction ! 20 . ISt—^. 
site of the Stony Brook S.'.V.oH. 00 ,.^! 
Sewerage Disposal Plant ««t. ' 
They were owned by the ""'" 
Traffic Service Company of "" 



LOSE UGLY FAT 

■nd ury to tak«. MONADEX w>U 



v» «x«rclu. Charm 

from River Road tod«y. monad 

t the eonstruptinn • 20 d .»y wppi 



WANTED 

FOR: MFC OF THE LOCK 




Linden. 

Radio Taken. The Rug and ' 
Furniture Mart warehouse 55 
State Road, was entered and 
ransacked last week but the 
only item reported stolen by 
police was a $25 AM-FM radio 

The building was entered by 
forcing a window in the rear 
exit was through an overhead 
door. Ptl. Peter Savalli in- 
vestigated. 

PREVIEW PLANNED 
For Wellesley Antique 
Show. The 17th Annual 
Princeton Antiques Show, 
sponsored by the Wellesley 
Club of Central New Jersey, 
will open with the customary 
cocktail preview for patrons 
Wednesday, March 24, from 6- 

9 at Princeton Day School. 
The cocktail preview per- 
mits patrons and their guests 
to examine the 33 collections 
at a leisurely pace Dealers 
will be available to discuss 
their collections, which in- 
clude furniture, paintings, 
graphics, quilts, books, silk 
flower arrangements, toys, 
jewelry, clocks, barometers, 
weapons, maps, marine ar- 
tifacts and folk art in many 
forms. Cocktails hors 
d'oeuvres and soft piano 
music will add to the en- 
joyment. 

All patrons of the show are 
invited to attend and to bring 
guests. Non-patrons may 
purchase preview tickets for 
$7.50 per person, either at the 
door or in advance from a club 
member Preview tickets 
entitle the holder to one ad- 
ditional admission to the show 
during regular hours, noon to 

10 p.m. Thursday and Friday, 
March 25 and 26, and noon to 5 
Saturday, March 27 

Patron's tickets may be 
obtained from Mrs. Hallet 
Johnson, 924-1514. 

FORGOTTEN VILLAGES 
On View At Historical 
Society. Forgotten Villages 
near Princeton, an exhibit of 
the Historical Society, is 
currently on display at 
Bainbridge House. It consists 



< eo« $300 lor 

L»ra« •COnOmy 

ry AOUATABS 

.-.tly to h«lp you lOM 

AOUATABS-. "«.1» 

wor*» - $3.00. Both 

And fold by: 

The Forer Pharmacy 

160 Witherspoon St 



Otoe Sfee 



27 Palmer Sq. West 

921-7298 

Princeton, N.J. 



SAVE FOUR DOLLARS 
While Dining with a Friend 

Coupon good Feb. 1 & 1 7 



• CockulU » Wan Sovto 



CHARLEY'S 
BROTHER 

Routs 518 Spur, Hopmll, N.J. 609-460-0110 | 
Ju*t off Rom* 31 




▼ Aw .'W ^ ^ A Di,ec ' lo your d °° r - 

^ , / V ( <tk ■ Blakely brings com- 

»4fl Hi Dlete drycleanme and 



f 



dryc leaning ; 
laundry service-fresh 
and sparkling. These 
are two of the 14 de- 
pendable servicemen 
reguli 




t 



fe* 



WANTED FOR QUESTIONING REGARDING 

FINE HAIRCUTTING AND 

QUALITY SERVICE 

REWARD 

HEALTHY HAIR REFLECTING 
THE NATURAL YOU 

SUSPECTS MAY BE LOCATED IN THE VICINITY OF 

THE ALLEY AT THREE SPRING STREET 



FOR REWARD 
CALL: 

921-1464 



jfcretMw a » wmiJW Mi u « ioiW^ 








Say it hundreds of ways 

with cards and gifts from 




I- 



CARDS • GIFTS • PARTY GOODS 

PRINCETON SHOPPING CENTER 



£ 



MAILBOX 



- £ Help Appreciated. 

• To the Editor of Town Topics : 
- My deep thanks to the police 
co and Rescue Squad who came 
■g so promptly to my aid on the 
5 morning of January 30. Also to 
£ the person who first called for 
*~ help. I shall be most grateful if . 
_£the kind people who cared for 
■ me that morning would call 
.924-5165 so I may thank them, i 
c This community is blessed 
5 in having such a teem of 
S doctors and nurses at the 
£ Emergency Unit of the 
£ Princeton Medical Center. 

HANS ROSENHAUPTi 
u Mount Lucas Road 



,2 Editor's Note : Princeton 
c Township police report that 

1 Dr. Rosennaupt was on the 
°way to the Medical Center 

when he fell from his bicycle. 
His injuries were not serious. 

Special Election Urged 
To the Editor of Town Topics : 
Republican members of 
Princeton Township Com- 
mittee are and have been 
abundantly conscious of their 
responsibilities in both the 
normal public business and in 
the matter of the Township 
Committee vacancy. In the| 
latter, I believe three issues 
have transcended all others, 
yet none has been given the 
broad analysis we have 
learned to expect from 
Princeton's accustomed 
champions of an informed 
public. 

1. The right of the voters to 
determine for themselves 
which candidate in last 
November's great voting 
debacle shall represent them 
for the next three years ; 

2. The lower court's recent 
judgment that New Jersey's 
new 1975 Vacancy Law applies 
toour circumstances; and 

3. The clear and urgent need 
for legislative amendment of 
the statute to protect other 
municipalities from the same 
disruptions. 

The court's decision 
authorized Township Com- 
mittee, in filling the vacancy, ! 
not to ascertain the will of the 
voters but instead to employ a 
provision of the new statute, 
which is both partisanly 
restrictive and totally 
discounts the growing body of 
independent voters. 
Unchallenged or affirmed by a 
higher court, the order could 
have disturbing implications 
for other towns and cities in 
New Jersey... 

Because even lawyers are 
so uncertain about the statute, 
the court's judgment is being 
appealed. In his oral decision 
the Judge acknowledged the 
need for "ascertaining the will 
of the people," but he reluc- 
tantly found no authority for 
the special election requested 
by Republicans Accordingly 
he ruled that Township 
Committee has the "authority 
to vote to appoint" - in the 
words of the law, it "may" 
appoint, not must - a fifth 
member until the November 
election, and that member 
should be a Democrat. (He 
applied the statute's term 
"previous incumbent" to 
either of the two Democrats on 
Committee during the 
preceding term and based his 
decision partly on the in- 
correct premise that 
"neither. ..had sought 
reelection.") 

For Township Committee to 
act precipitately to appoint 
would therefore be 
irresponsible, particularly in 
light of the contrary resolution 



by a judge in Bergen County of 
an identical voting machine 
failure in Oakland Borough. 

That community has had for 
over three weeks a fully 
functioning Council, thanks to 
having filled its vacancy by 
special election.. It was won 
by the Independent candidate 
whose total vote had been 
affected by the November 
breakdown ... 

The Oakland decision 
although not binding, offered 
us a legal precedent whereby 
to reenfranchise all of the 



voters of Princeton Township, political pressure or threats to 
A special election for a full judges Failing that, we may 
three-year term for the entire then reach the point where the 
Township, as in Oakland, is vital principle of free selection 
still the only fair way to may nave to be sacrificed to 
recognize the voters' right to the expedient of appointment 
make their choice in the interests of speedier 

But the Township Com- execution of the public 
mittee must not continue for business, 
long without its full com- ELIZABETH L. HUTTER 

plement. We have an Van Dyke Road 

obligation to bring as much 

persuasion and pressure to Editor's Note: Mrs. Hutter 
Bear on all phases of the ap- is one of the two Republican 
peals process to accelerate it, members of Township 
and this does not imply Committee. 




what the world needs now are... 
indoor gardens:., call till :w-84os 




NOTICE 
Letters to TOWN TOPICS' 
"Mailbox' should be typed, 
double-spaced, signed and 
received for publication no later 
than Monday No letter will be prin- 
ted without a valid signature and 
address Letters longer than 500' 
words may be edited or omitted 
entirely, at the discretion of the 
editor Letters on sub/ecfs not 
specifically related to the Pnn- 
jei&ri area way aiso^e wtected 



Automatic 

Bank Credit can 

take some of the headache out of 

holiday charges, income tax (ouch!)... 

or let you get that bronze mongoose doorstop you've always wanted! 



ABC. We call it Automatic Bank Credit. You may have heard it 
called Overdraft Checking. □ But whatever you call it, you 
have an instant loan available to you up to $5,500 tied in to your 
checking account. You just write a check in excess of your 
checkbook balance for the amount you need, and you have 
written your own private loan. No need to reapply. And no 
trip in to see us each time you need money. Repayment is in 
sensible monthly instalments, and as you pay off your loan 
balance, your available credit renews itself. □ ABC is really 
great! It costs nothing unless you use it. So don't wait until you 
have to have it. Apply today 1 



HORIZON 



PRINCETON BANK 

AND TRUST Company 



Serving Mercer County 
om 8 Convenient Location 



ipits 



of ihe 




Town completed their freshman 
year to continue in college. 
com. nueo irom page ' Serving on the Scholarship 

„,„,.. . . . Committee this vear are Mrs. 

of old and new photographs. x nomas g Hartman 
maps and histories oT once- chalrman and Mes dames 
thriving communities in the Richard H Cobb, Leon A. 

,,„' , , Greenberg, William H Moran 

Its purpose is to make and Laurence D. Stifel. Mrs. 
people aware of places that Frederick G. Wightman, Jr. is 
they may drive by every day. chairman of t % e Memorial 
unaware that they were once LoanFund. 

active towns The main 

villages are: Aqueduct Mills. STAINED GLASS NEXT 
near the aqueduct of the ,„ Historical Society Lee- 
Delaware Rantan Canal and „,„, Henry Lee WilletwiU be 
Sf„ S " C M 0f l eve l al J a K rlym ' lls; g"est lecturer at The 
Perms Neck, which became a Historical Society's morning 
i,ii y ( c h ro S iroads . community lecture series n Tuesday at 
n~™^ ^ nS !^ 1Ck PJ< L W , aS W:30 in Pierce Hall, Trinity 
XT i ! " SO 4 , Grovers Mills church He wil , sho ' w sljd ^ 
S w ^'milling settlement wd speak on wha ,. s New In 

Pri* 65 ,' W "i dSOr Townsh, P ; StainedGlass. 

Princeton Basin, a once Mr WUIet a graduate of 

Sij^H canal P ort a " A Princeton University, is an 

railroaddepot with a number internationally known expert 

o businesses and small in- in the field of stained glass and 

dustnes which disappeared , h h the yea^s in . 

rlZ^* Ca "r cease ? c c °m- troduced several new 

RrLi °P erall . on; an i Si0 "y techniques developed at his 

,/m.™ Tr °"& S er studi os in Philadelphia 

settlement founded in 696 in Examples of his work may be 

which a number of early 18th see n in churches, synagogues. PERFECT TUNING: Robert M. Turner ol Hopewell 

century nouses as well as the and residences in 49 states and makes final adjustments in the electronic system ot 

stand OftefvilfaaesTncUed ma 7 foreign countries. Four his 4,400 pipe organ at the First Presbyterian Church 

are ^ Jugtown Ce^r Grove IT'T '" T m "ISTI? °' Tren,on ' The ° r 9anmaker and his organ will be 

Port M?rcer. Mount Rose g£E!' are Mr Wlllet s highlighted in "A Particular Sound: The Turner | 

Princessville.Bridgepointand rX?will he served at m 0r9 .? n ' Tuesday at 9:30 and next Thursday at 6:30 

Gr ; g fr St S, Wn ,.,.,„ TiSKi.5 mayle pJ?: °" New Jersey Public Television channels 23 and 52. 

Jeff Macechak, of Penn- cnased at me door or at ^ e : 

ington, a young photo- Historical Society, 158 Nassau 
™ 0ry Street, anytime except 
Monday. All are welcome. 
" «. <r. r .. .- .<-r.r-.„. .*,r. The sixth lecture will be 
MARCH 15 IS DEADLINE Februar y 17 when Rutn 

. ,. r .. scholarship Andrews will speak on An 
Appbcations. Information and i ntroduct ion To American 
applications for the Folk Art 

Scholarship Awards of the 

Women's College Club are LECTURE, EXHIBIT SET 
now available in the guidance To Honor Experimenter. 
offices of the four secondary Joseph Henr y^ mid . 19th 
schools. century Princeton professor 

Applicants for the and pioneering researcher in 
Scholarship Awards must be the science and technology of 
senior girls who have attended electricity, will be com- 
Princeton schools for at least memorated Friday with an 
two years, have applied to exhibition in Jadwin HaU and 
land subsequently registered demonstration lecture in 
at) an accredited four-year Palmer Hall which will 
American college or utilize some of his original 
university, and have taken the apparatus. Moreover, Volume 
College Board Scholastic n of "The Papers of Joseph 
Aptitude Test or the American Henry." the first volume to 
College Test 

Applications for grants, cnniimndonNwtPw 

marie on the basis of financial 
need, high scholastic stan- 
ding, qualities of unusual ^^^ 
leadership and character, 
extra curricular activities and 
promise of service, are now 



FRESH FLOWERS 
APPLEGATE FLORAL SHOP 



Palmer Sq. W. 



Monday-Saiurday9 i« 



J>i 



: ONE STOP 

120% OFF! KK™! 



j on ALL Wallpaper 

AND 
J Window Shades 



CENTER FOR 
: FLOORS, WALLS 
• AND WINDOWS 
J AT 

REGENT FLOOR COVERING 

Carpeting 

Resilient 
Flooring 
• Schumacher Wallpaper & Fabric 
• Joanna Custom Shades 



HOURS: Daily 9 to 5 Th.nv & I 
"An Armstrong Floor Fashion C 

(609) 737 2466 



• Lees • Maa.ee 

• Bigelow • Armstroi 

• Armstrong • Amtic 

• Congoleum • GAF 

• Kentile 



j-apher interested In I 
nas compiled the exhibition. 



Woolwortlx 

Sat is fac t ion Guaranteed ■ Replacement or Money Refunded 



ng accepted. Applications 
must be completed by March 
15. 

The Women's College Club 
is dedicated to raising funds 
for scholarship aid for 
qualified girls who will enter a 
tour year college after 
graduation from high school. 
Funds for the awards come 
from members' dues, 
donations and a dessert-card 
party and white elephant sale 
being held this year on March 
1. 



Fund to enable girls who have Dr. Allen G. Shenstone 





His or her 
watches 
by Timex® 

*2P 5 

Exquisite fashion watches for 
her, handsome calendar styles 
for him. Water resistant, self 
wind styles. A gift to remember. 



Heart shape box 
of delicious 
chocolates 



*3 



97 



1 lb. box 

Say 'I love you' with a box of 
delicious light and dark choco- 
lates with hard and soft centers. 
2 lb. heart shape box . . $5.97 






Nude stretch 
panti-hose in 
fashion colors 



Plastic terrariums 
make lasting gifts 



each 

Reg. SI 2.99 

Create a garden in a lovely 
terrarium. Choose from three 
styles: genie, satellite or table 
style. Buy now and save! 



Reg. 97d 
Comfortable and trim fitting 
100% nylon with sandal toe. 
One size fits all. Choose from 
the latest fashion colors. 



Men's Wear 



Up to 50% off 

OPEN 9 to 5:30 

Princeton Clothing Co. 

1 7 Witherspoon St . 924-0704 



4" Rhapsodie 
African violet 
in mesh basket 



*3 



19 



Lovely blooming African vio- 
lets in a variety of colors. Each 
in its own white mesh bas- 
ket with handle. Good buy! 




100% stretch nylon for the larger 
Feature non-run sandal 




B-leaf. Co 
and t> J 3 ■ v 
messy 9>u* and comets 




-;-plNEWOOD DERBY WINNERS: Cub Scout Pack 43 members who won trophies for 
± speed and for design In the annual Derby at Nassau Presbyterian Church are (left 
-to right) Douglas Sensenlg, John Holland, Warren Buckwatd, Matthew Weymar, 
o Andy Phillips, Gabriel Ondettl and Steve Goeke. Michael Sheehan, also a winner, 
)> was absent at the picture-taking. 



£ Topics of the Town 

•£ deal with his Princeton years, 

O has recently been published. 

H» Dr. Allen G. Shenstone, 

S class of 1909 professor of 

o physics, wiU give the lecture 

»- on "Joseph Henry's Electrical 

Researches" in Palmer Hall 

301 at 3.15. The exhibition of 

documents and apparatus at 

Jadwin Hall will have limited 

attendance on Friday but will 

thereafter be open to the 

public through February 28. 

The publishing project, 
which envisions six volumes 
devoted to Joseph Henry's 
Princeton period and another 
nine or fen covering the 
Washington years in which he 
was the First Secretary of the 
Smithsonian Institute, is co- 
sponsored by the National 
Academy of Sciences, the 
Smithsonian Institute and the 
American Philosophical 
Society. The first volume, 
which dealt with Henry's 
years in Albany as a teacher 
in Albany Academy, was 
published in 1972. The editor is 
Nathan Reingold of the 
Smithsonian who will of 



Doll Show at Griggs town 
A Doll House, Doll, 

Miniature and Antique Toy 
Show will be held on 
Saturday, February 28, 
from 10 to 6 at the 
Griggstown Reformed 
Church on Canal Road 
Awards will be given by 
professional judges. 

Among the doll 
categories to be judged are 
wooden dolls, Culper dolls, 
dolls of paper macne, cloth, 
American celluloid, and 
American composition; 
dolls entered by the 
National Institute of Doll 
Artists, homemade dolls, 
dolls wearing clothes made 
by contestant and dolls 
entered by five different 
age groups from under 12 
to over 65. 

There will be a door prize 
and a snack bar, and a 
donation of $1 will be 
received. For further in- 
formation, call Margaret 
Taylor, Mondays, Wed- 
nesday and Fridays at 359- 
3956, or Mrs. Lester 
Terhune, R.D. 1, at 359- 
5517. 



Produced by the Agri- 
Chemicals Division of U.S. 
Steel, and widely used by 
farmers and professionals, the 
fertilizer will be sold by the 
Troop at prices competitive 
with popular trade names. 

Proceeds will help cover 
expenses for a major Scout 
trip this summer in which the 
boys may earn new Scout 
grades, merit badges and 
other awards. Members of the 
Troop will sell door-to-door 
between February 2 and 21, 
and free home delivery will be 
made by the Scouts and their 
fathers on March 20 or 27, 
depending on the weather. 

If interested, call com- 
mitteeman James S. Bowers, 
921-2417. 

SHOPLIFTERS BUSY 
Money, Skirt, Meat Stolen. 

Two young men about 16 
entered the Princeton Music 
Center on Palmer Square 
West last week and engaged 
the manager in conversation. 
Police said that while one 
was discussing records, the 
other allegedly went behind a 
counter and took a deposit 
envelope containing $296 in 
cash and $56 in checks. 



ficially represent the Institute and teaching here for the next 

on J? id , ay u „ „ 13years. A clerk at The Piccadilly 

The Joseph Henry House, a boutique, 200 Nassau Street, 

familiar landmark on Nassau FERTILIZER SALE SET called police last week to 
Street, is the yellow house in To Aid Scout Trip. Boy Scout report £ e shoplifting of a $32 
front of and to the east of Troop 43 has embarked on its sjJrt she gave a description 
Nassau Hall Henry accepted annual program of selling f the suspect to police who 
a professorship at Princeton high grade fertilizer in the activated the Merchant Alert 
in 1832 and combined research Greater Princeton area. Pi fl n r wherein the suspect's 

description is conveyed to all 
merchants in town. 

Arrested later on Palmer 
Square by Det. Timothy 
Huizing and charged with the 
theft was Gloria Perez of 
Little Hall, Princeton 
University. 

A London broil valued at 
$3.94 was stolen last week 
from Davidson's Market on 
Nassau Street. 

Lt. Bernard Lenhardt in- 
vestigated and subsequently 
arrested William Dovey, 29, of 
Quebec, Canada and charged 
him with shoplifting. 

OFFICERS INSTALLED 
By West Windsor Fire Co.At 
the January meeting of the 
West Windsor Volunteer Fire 
Company Number 1, the 
following were installed as 
officers: president, Paul 
LaSelle; vice president, Bruce 
Landau; recording secretary, 
Malcolm Rogers; 

corresponding secretary, 
Ronald Rogers; treasurer, 
Robert Webb; assistant 
treasurer, Jack Honore III, 

Also, trustees, Harry 
Canning, Victor Mount and 
Paul Conover; chief, Vernon 
Roszel; first assistant chief, 
Charles Appleget ; second 
assistant chief, James Van- 
dergrift; captain, James 
Greschak; first lieutenant, 
Wayne Tindall ; second 
lieutenant, Paul Conover; 
third lieutenant, Bruce 
Landau; Engineer, Gene 
Rogers; and assistant 
engineer, Thomas Barry. 

Paul Conover and James 
Greschak received awards for 
Firemen of the Year, and 
Walter Appleget was honored 
for meritorious service. Four 
members, Gregory Piatt, 
Jack Honore III, Ronald 
Rogers and David Vandegrift, 
recently completed Mercer 
County Fire School. For 
further information, call Jack 
Honore III, publicity chair- 
man, 10 Dunbar Road, 
Trenton, 452-2111, ext. 231. 




Our lightweight, guest-sized transportable 
gives you a good size screen, and a great pictu 
black and white and bright; crisp, clear and live 
Engineered with 100% solid state circuitry, to 
ensure safe, dependable, smooth operation r 
in today and pick up a winner. From Sony, I 
of champio 

"ITS A SONY" 




NOW YOU HAVE A CHOICE! 

We're in Business 24 Hours a Day... 

921 -741 5 



EXECUTIVE ANSWERING SERVICE 



The Full Service Answer 



chests 




tj — a 



For over 25 years Country Workshop has been making quality chests that 
offer durabitty and flexabltty at reasonable cost. Constructed of solid walnut 
and solid wtiKe maple, our chest* have dove-tailed and center-guided 
drawers. They are modular In design snd may be used separately or grouped 
with our other ready-to-flnbth furniture. Stop In and see our large selection 
of chests, hinged door cabinets, bookcases, desks, beds, tables etc. or send 
25a for our lluslraled catalog. 

Country Workshop 



Princeton, N.J. The S 



i. RtS 27 4 518 > 



PRINCETON ADULT SCHOOL 



PLEASE NOTE: Due to an error. Registration Night for Language Courses was 
listed incorrectly as Jan. 23. Language Courses ARE NOT FILLED and you 

may still register in person on February 5. 



REGISTRATION FEBRUARY 5 
PRINCETON HIGH SCHOOL CAFETERIA 

Registration: 4-6 p.m. 
Open House: 8-9:30 p.m. 

(Course instructors will be available for discussion) 

SPRING TERM 
Feb. 17 -April 22 



Brochures listing courses are available at the Princeton 
Public Library. For further information call: 



924-6990 



Six- Year Program to Restore Battlefield Park 
Will Meet with Success in Bicentennial Year 




After six years of feast- 
famine negotiations with the 
State, the Princeton Bat- 
tlefield Area Preservation 
Society is in the happy position 
of seeing most of its dreams 
come true for the restoration 
of an historic landmark and 
the creation of a tasteful 
surrounding park. Born out of 
the 1969 controversy over the 
acquisition of the Weller tract 
between the Quaker Meeting 
House and the Thomas Clark 
farmhouse, near where the 
Battle of Princeton was fought 
and in which General Mercer 
died, the Society has sought to 
have the house restored and 
given period furnishing to 
serve as park headquarters 
and museum in a manner 
"worthy of Princeton." 

Among the founding 
members were William P. 

Starr, Margen Penick, Connie HISTORY BUFF: Richard Baker, 1 Armour Road, 

Greiff, Mary Whitney, president of the Society with some of the prints, 

Kemble Widmer, and Robert books and authentic replica of the flag at the Battle of 

Clifford (who has since moved Princeton which he has gathered for sale for the 

SJSSSa £3'm y? ■ m y Societ V. In the foreground are some of the lead foot 

77S%EPteStaST re 9 iments and ca,va 'y* American, British and 

minde^alS cyclists 3 BfffrflSJfeaS" ' ast , bu » on and *"• "»* *■ 

birdwatchers and have on on Geor 9 e Washington's chest, made for the 

viewed with dismay some of Soc 'e'y by a young couple In Wales and available at 

the grandiose schemes for an S1 30 a set ol 39 men and officers or Individually. 

?! a n b0r ! te „ V i Sit °M, C ! n ! eran H p ? rt J on i" 'f e ? ld , carria l£ came and the apple orchard 

two large, black-topped shed and toilet facilities will w ith its Dost and rail fence in 

parking lots also proposed by be constructed in the lean-to wh ich General Mercer battled 

the State. behind the shed. the British. 

Then Statelu7ds dried up; The SocietyTwWch had done seed* fte'shoulder^Mol 
the two mayors appealed to considerable research on Mer cer Street and ultimately 
Governor Byrne; the Society interpretive facilities through t forbid parking on both 
met with Environmental a committee headed by Mr. sides A bicycle path is 
Protection Commissioner Baker, will be responsible for planned along the north side of 
Bardin; and early in January, installing a tilted model of the the street under the Town- 
assured that the state would Battlefield terrain with an ship's jurisdiction 

undertake the project but on a automated overhead slide ' 

reduced scale, the Society's projector playing down upon Mrs. Penick, vice-president 

officers met with Alfred it Leaflets describing the of PBAPS and chairman of the 

Guido, acting director of Battle will be written by the Park Design Committee for 

parks and forests, to work out Society and published by the the Society is delighted about 

the details of the compromise. State. The State has also all these plans. "A lot of 

According to Richard agreed to furnish numbered people were discouraged when 
Baker, PBAPS president, the cement markers throughout everything was cancelled by 
State has agreed to foot the the park which will be keyed the State," she said, "but now 
bill for the restoration of the to the leaflets and the terrain we have the ideal plan for a 
farmhouse, using plans drawn model and which will mark quiet, low key walking park 
up by John Dickey, a various important spots, such which will be an addition to 
restoration architect of as where Moulder's two-gun the community " 
Media, Pa. Workmen have battery held off the British, There have been nice 
already removed two small and where Mercer fell. donations from the Dogwood 
later additions to the house. The Society has hired Garden Club and the Daffodil 
extended the porch roof and Robert Zion of Breen and Zion, Society, Mrs. Penick related, 
have replaced anachronistic Imlaystown, to make a and the Garden Club of 
French windows. The 19th comprehensive long-range Princeton and the Stonybrook 
century wing will become an landscape plan. The park is to Garden Club, which originally 
apartment for a caretaker- be a naturalistic area planted had offered jointly to screen 
custodian couple. with trees and shrubbery that the first visitors' center and 
could have been there at the parking lots, will be reap- 

The Mercer Room. The time of the Battle and proached under the new plan. 
. original house consists of a retaining the open farm The Society plans two plant- 
living room with a fireplace country topography. ins f bulbs in the fall, when 

wall, a smaller room and the townspeople will be asked to 

Mercer Room with its fine Authentic Plantings. An bring their trowels and plant 

corner fireplace in which the herb garden has been sug- snowdrops by the grave site 

General died. Upstairs is a gested rather than the ex- and daffodils - 18th century 

bedroom, a small sewing tensive flower beds originally varieties only - near the 

room and one other room. proposed; flowering trees house. 

These will be furnished with such as dogwood, shadbloom 

authentic 1777 or earlier and redbud will be planted Th Snriptv :, ,. rBine the 
pieces, some already donated along the woodland fringe and , ta te to Mmole e ife work on 
to the State and some acquired near the columns; an in- ?£ a . u ?!£ „u£i,^ fnr 
by the Society Some samplers congruous stand of bamboo ?,IS. ' i» m™ J»r tS 
known to have been worked by will be removed, as will {eHX' ,3 bWh. „f re- 
lator generations of the Clark certain other plantings by the SSjTSoSS&Slffi 
family are the only exceptions house; and a few pathways to ST 6 ^"!. .,?L,*£«. X! 
to the 1777 rule. 

A one-way loop road and Institute Woods 
single parking facility for two cleared. For greater ■.-Vdi! 
■" • ■■ - ■. * n n, «f nas neari 



addition to the founders 
mentioned above, he cited 
Alfred Busselle, Edward 
D'Arms, John Flemer, Paul 
Barringer, Mrs Douglas 
Delanoy and Mrs. Frederick 
Freylinghuysen as having 
contributed importantly to the 
success of a citizens' group 
dealing with the state on a 
matter of importance to both. 



Nassau Hobby 

and Crafts 

1 42 Nassau Street 
924-2739 




^Princeton Bagels 

and Pastry Shop 

Princelcr, Shopping Center No Harrison Si 924-9611 



To pay its share, the Society 



be located in the 



gravel-topped. The con- replanting the cornfield to the and in funds heW in trust. It 
troversial visitors ; center wiU east of the house through ^ SDOnsore d fund raising 
| .-Mitral which Cadwaladers forces ^^ from the seUing $ 
prints of the Battle to 
collecting fallen branches 
from the Mercer Oak, which 
PDS woodworking students 
will cut and imprint with the 
Mercer Oak logo and which 
will be sold by the Historical 
Society. 

Mr. Starr, currently 
chairman of PBAPS, calls the 
six-year undertaking by the 
Society a "team effort" In 




VISITORS' CENTER: The carriage house belonging to 
the Thomas Clark farmhouse will be remodelled by 
the State and will house a terrain model of the Battle 
of Princeton designed professionally and built for the 
Princeton Battlefield Area Preservation Society. 



READING 
CONSULTANT 

Specializing in various types 
ot reading and writing dis- 
abilities 



Mr. Friedland 
609-443-5538 



Final 

CLEARANCE 

(begins Saturday February 7th) 
All remaining Fall and Winter 

TOPS $4.00 

SLACKS & SKIRTS $5.00 
DRESSES $6.00 



Begins Saturday, February 7th, at 




Landau's too 



Teen Sizes 6-1 4 



126 Nassau Street 



Junior Sizes 3-1 3 




available now: 

COMPETITIVE 

CONVENTIONAL MORTGAGES 




ggfz&spg 



• flexible terms 

• prompt service 

• up to 90% mortgages 

• flexible interest rates 



Right now mortgage money is available. If you are considering 
the purchase of a new home, we invite you to visit any of our 
three convenient offices to discuss your plans and mortgage 
requirements. Our experienced loan offices will help make 
your plans a reality. 



(^Nassau ^Savings 

^— S And Loan Association 



FSLTC 



And Loan Association 

194 NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON • 924-449» 
44 HIOHTSTOWN RO. • PRINCETON JUNCTION • 7W-1S00 
MONTGOMERY SHOPPING CENTER • RT 20* • M1-1M0 



I Down-to-Earth Notes 




facilities) which are essential 

f» i mu The to the life cycle of two-thirds of 
I pre-empts our food and sport fish. With 
state liability laws. The 



AMBLESIDE 

Uirch-nst Nil! sen 



their spills rapidly and that would go more jobs The 
responsibly; 3) discouraging less direct results of oil spills 
potential spillers from spilling reach far inland in a 
in the first place (Tankersare snowballing way, though 
notorious for deliberately space prevents elaborating on 
"flushing"oilintotheseaj that. 

If you are not a shore Suffice it to say that the 
property owner or com- most constructive of the three 
mercial fisherman, all this essential functions of oil spill 
£ Offshore Oil and Us. Those privately with thespillerfor*) may seem of secondary im- liability legislation is 
• who write on the subject of oil days before they can approach portance to you (unless, of discouraging spillers from 
"- in the Outer Continental Shelf the compensation fund, while course, you're an ocean spilling To help bring this 
>MOCS) mav well turn out to be the Studds bill permits lover) Its primary im- about I strongly urge you to 
5 more prolific than the offshore claimants to go directly to the porUnce to us all is certainly write: Mario Biaggi, Chair- 
2 "wells " themselves ! Because fund (although they are not not reflected by idiotic, in- man, and Members of the 
2 the subject is complicated, prevented from settling cendiary and ignorant Coast Guard Subcommittee, 
^ reading about it may well privately with the spiller ) statements liki 
-leave many people with a The Studds bill obviously aids Delaware Senato; 
"? somewhat confused "there's fishermen and owners of Frankly, I am tired of seeing Building, Washington, DC 
z nothing 1 can do about it" resort-related businesses who fish and ducks given more 20515, asking them to vote for 
c reaction There is, however, cannot afford a three months preference than working men the Studds bill, H.R 10756. 
2 one aspect of the operation we delay in obtaining com- and women." In fact, the Hurry! 
g can and should do something pensation 15,000 jobs the Senator en- —Pat Light 

= about in a hurry oil spill visions with drilling could 

? liability legislation Liability Limits. The easily be offset by the cost in 

- Although the volume of oil Administration bill limits the jobs and money to the coastal 
8 entering our waters is con- liability of spillers for both resort industries (Jersey's is 
q. bnually growing, protection damage and clean-up costs, worth 4 billion annually to the 
° for those who bear the brunt of with a particularly low limit state economy) resultingfrom 
Z it is negligible, the result of for tankers The Studds bill one major or several minor 
« incomplete and uncoordinated limits damage liability to a spills close together 

° federal laws covering damage realistically nigh amount and 

and clean-up costs With the requires spillers to pay the full The fishing industry could 
almost inevitable coming of costs of clean-up The latter be affected temporarily by oil- 
offshore oil rigs OCS drilling, requirement ensures a rapid polluted fishing waters, or 
increasing numbers of "frail" and responsible clean-up, permanently by the loss of 
supertankers (I've read they avoiding non-thorough or marshes (vulnerable to both 
are built to last only 10 unfinished operations by oil pollution and destruction 
years') deepwater oil ports spillers who wish to stay by oil-related coastal 
and concomitant onshore within their limits 
facilities, the risk of spills and Slate 
costly damage will increase 
enormously. state liability 

Studds bill allows states to 

So where do we come in? enact and enforce their own 
Once again, it's the need for laws, giving state govern- 
the letter or wire, if you ments and citizens the op- 
prefer (remember you can portunity to take advantage of 
send a Public Opinion liability plans suited to 
message for $2) to Washington specific local needs, 
in the next few days. The In addition, several state 
House Merchant Marine & laws now in force - Maine, 
Fisheries Committee (it Massachusetts, Oregon and 
seems to me those two could Washington, for example -are 
well be conflicting interests, stronger than the 

but that's another subject) is Administration's proposed 
considering two bills covering federal laws; and it seems 
oil spill liability and com- imprudent to nullify workable 
pensation existing state liability 

One is an Administration legislation with untried 
bill IH.R 9294), and the other federal legislation If the 
was introduced by federal law is effective, the 

Massachusetts Represen- state will have no incentive to 
tative Gerry Studds (H.R enforce its own stronger laws. 
10756.) The committee, which Conversely, if the federal law 
has focused primarily on the is inadequate, the states 
industry-favored Adminis- should be allowed to ad- 
tration bill despite minister its own liability 
strong environmental and plans. 

coastal state officials' support 

of the Studds bill, is winding While both bills impose 
up hearings and a vote is liability on spillers for clean- 
expected Tuesday While both up and damage costs up to 
bills create a pollution com- specified limits, the Studds 
pensation fund to cover all bill seems more likely to fulfill 
otherwise unmet costs, key the three basic functions of oil 
differences in the bill are; spill liability: 1) enabling 
Damage Claims victims of oil spills to obtain 

Procedures. The damage compensation in a 

Administration bill requires timely fashion; 2) en- 
cjaimants to negotiate couraging spillers to clean up 
wnBsam nWi^agii Pi i-^i n r ■- n rf 



Slrirm^, 

jft^ All tobacco, cigars 
J^3 from 1 5' 

Palmer Square 924-0123 



£IU. 



! CHAMBERS ST. 



The 

Junction Pharmacy 

• Prescriptions 

• Cosmetics 

• Russell Stover Candy 

Weekdays 9-9, Sat. 9-6, Sun. 1 0-1 
Hightstown Road, Princeton Junction 



P. A. Astlton, R.P. 



799-1232 



SEE 
VINYL SHIELD PANELING 

At GR0VER LUMBER 




Our Passbooks are more interesting 
because we pay our savers the highest 
rate allowed by law: 




THIS WALL IS: 

♦ TOUGH LIKE YOUR VINYL FLOORS 

♦ HARDWOOD PANEL, VINYL SURFACE 

♦ LOW COST, NO MAINTENANCE 

Grover Lumber 

194 Alexander St. 
924-0041 



Some 

passbooks 

are more 

interesting 

than others. 



The First National Bank 
of Princeton 

90 Nassau Street. Princeton, N.J. 08540 • (609) 921-6100 



5 



% 



Compounded 
Quarterly 



FROM DAY OF DEPOSIT 
TO DAY OF WITHDRAWAL 
Every day funds are on deposit 
you earn interest, provided your 
balance remains above $25. 
Why not ask your banker what 
you're earning now on Regular 
Passbook Savings. If it's less than 5% 
per annum, then visit First National 
Bank of Princeton. We won't 
underrate you. 

P.S. We also pay the highest rates 
allowed by law on a wide variety of 
Certificates of Deposit 



United 
HJersq 
Banks 



MAIN OFFICE: Corner of Nassau and Wltherspoon Streets 
DRIVE-IN BRANCHES: 370 East Nassau near Harrison ■ Princeton Junction at 40 Washington Road 
Lawrence Township on the Princeton Pike 

MOTOR BANK: Comer of Wallace and Hightslown Road, Pnnceton Junction, N.J. 
PRINCETON COMMERCE CENTER: 29 Emmons Drive. Bldg E 



MEMBER FDIC 



DAVIDSON'S 

SUPERMARKETS [Hi 



172 NASSAU STREET, PRINCETON 



MEAT DEPT. SAVINGS! 

LisriA Choice 

NELESS *«29l 



5 



Italian 
Tomatoes 

TOMATO 
PASTE 

GOLD MEDAL 
FLOUR 

APRICOT 
HALVES ,, 

FAB 

BORAX — 

Chicken of the 
Sea Tuna 

RICE-A-RONI 



59 c 
$1 

69 c 

J9< 

W 

59' 
$i 



99 



TETLEY 

TEA BAGS 'OOinpkg 

1 1 JJUl J L Pkgs of 2 rolls 07 

bIadcrumbs ~w 

Noodle Soup 5i«t« m s 1 

HF - zb o„e59 c 
ASPARAGUS 3-™>1 

SOAPPADS 3p kg so„8 J 1 

ffiK0C0AMIX24ozcan,s,e f J 1.69 

Regular or With Mini Marshmallows NESTLE'S 

HOT COCOA MIX i 2 e„v,n P , g 79 e 
BARTiETT PEARS bcan39 c 
LYSOL SPRAY i4«.*IJ9 
GLAD BAGS . S »*W 

CHOCOLATE BARS spa re ,n Pk9 69 e 
COLGATE TOOTHPASTE 7oz, b e89 c 
TYLENOL ioo,n Pk o89 e 

BABY SHAMPOO .oz $ 1.39 



AKERY DEPT. 



WHITE 
BREAD 



3 



Lemon Meringue Pie 20 oz m 79' 

blSSs »« 89< 
DONUT RINGS ^69' 

ANGEL FOOD RING »<*<**"& 



STORE HOURS Mon, 



U S DA. Choice 



BONELESS 
BEEF STEAKS 



Top Round, 

Sirloin Tip Round, or 

Round for Swissing 



s 



1 



79 



BEEF ROASTS 

SHOULDER OR BOTTOM ROUND 



1 



TOP ROUND 
ROAST 



$139 



1 



SIRLOIN TIP 
ROAST 



$1 39' 



1. 



RUMP ROAST 



lb 



$ 1. 



49 



FRESH CHICKEN LEGS „ 79* 

Regular SivieW,inR,bs W 

FRESH CHICKEN BREASTS «,. 99* 
FRESH CHICKEN CUTLETS , b $ 1 .99 



BEEF LIVER 



49< VEAL STEAKS , b 89< 



DELI DEPT. 



gi.U,l.l, l ,l. l .l.l.l,l.|ifJIIFJ:ll«.lllJ.H|,U,l,l. l ,l,l.l,U,l,l|gi 

— I Assorted Varieties ■ ^% JL 

| | | <Excep,B,own,e& Angel Food. f| 



/iQi 

r*g ■ w 



FRANKS i b vacp k g s 1.19 Smokev Links , 



FRESH PRODUCE 



ICEBURG 
LETTUCE « 

SLICING 
TOMATOES 3 c 

NAVEL ORANGES 

TEMPLE ORANGES 
JUICE ORANGES 



3QC DiicidusAPPLES 

< . ANJOU PEARS 

s ol3 I 



CARROTS 



8. o,$1 CHERRY TOMATOES 
15 SI CAROLINA YAMS 



$139 

ig I 

3,s$1 
il 

p,n,59< 

4 b sM 



[DUNCAN HINESi«^ h 

Layer Cake wnhPuscoupm 
j Mixes 

jg^TVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVYVWVVVVVVVVVVVMTVT^VVW i gjj 



and Additional 
*7.50 or More Porehar" 



1 5 s i California Lemons 1 for 59' 




AIRY DEPT. 



in,,,.!.,...... raw ¥n«.» i Mi i 



EGGS 



69' 



f 

j 1 

E 1 



COnAGE CHEESE 
MARGARINE 



Cheese Slices 
SlEEZ KISSES 
Kraft Swiss Cheese 
69 c Piiisburv Biscuits 

49 Grapefruit Juice 



,89 c 
,79' 
99' 
15' 
69< 



1 =g Fresh Large 

-'white 

dozen 

With This Coupon and Additional 
$5.00 or more purchase 

, Coupon good Feb 2iriruFe6 7 only 

iQwwmnwvr^ 

U.S. No. 1 AAA 

3 lb flilV 

With Tins Coupon and an ftdoroona 
$5.00 or More Purchase. 



YELLOW 
ONIONS 



i,»jj^j,i,i,i,L|yj^jiiJ.tiij»Hi^.i,i,i.i.i^^jRfc 



MORTON 

POT PIES 4eoz Pk9S 

ORANGE 
JUICE 



$ 1 

49' 



FROZEN FOOD 



3|Assorted Grinds 

^MAXWELL house 

21b. f^ B 
can 

With The Coupon 



$9-48 



COFFEE 



I 

II! 
% i 

I! 



Grapefruit Juice 5 < 

PWMOES "" 4, 

SLiCEDSTEAKS ,.., 
GREEN GIANT RICE 
Stir Fry Vegetables 
APPLE PIE 
Chocolate Eclairs . 



MACARONI 
<& CHEESE 4... 

ORANGE 

„f| JUICE 4e„ 

w $1 SOnPRETZELS 
$1.39 Macaroni & Cheese 
p>9 39 £ SNACKTRAYS . 

'T a 59< FRENCHTOAST . 

Frozen Foodtown FLOUNDER OR 

$1.49 SOLE : FILLETS . 
„ 79 c Peas/Pearl Onions 



$i 

$t 

oz p*g J J 

o,. 9 99 e 
„. 9 49 
.$1.39 
^39' 



l|^mn'VV'i 1 vvn'vvi'vnM')W'n n g. 



g l , l ,i.u,i,uii,i,i, liM i.r J : l .«.i. ia .i«,i,i,i,i,i, l ,i, t ,u,i^g 



Ef | Soap Powder 

3-B 
ALL 



99* 



With The Coupon 



H^yyryvvvvt'i'vvrvvvv'i'iM'Vvvvyrv'''"- fM 

gjl.u.l.n,! yMllM-.H~»M.lia?l 



Toward the purcha: 
3 pkgs ol 4 

Assorted Van 



THIS 

COUPON LIPTON CUP-A-SOUP 

WORTH 30 s off our regular low pries 

OQC WITH THIS COUPON 






a 



L 



53 



K3\S\Z£ZZZ ZZZZZZZZ2 Zj: 2 ZZ^: 1 



The Fireman's First Job-Fighting to Prevent Fires 



t-irelighfers do more than fight fires. In fact, they'd much rather 
prevent fires than fight them, and members of Princeton's three 
volunteer companies spend a lot of volunteer time doing just that. 

Princeton has 1 50 firemen — well, 1 49 firemen and 1 fire woman 
— and over the course of a year, these 1 50 volunteers inspect the 
places where public safety is important. And some places where 
private safety is vital, too. They don't inspect private homes, even 
on request, because there just aren't enough firemen for that big 
job. 

SCHOOLS, first of all. Public schools are inspected once a year, 
in August Private schools aren't inspected by Princeton's firemen, 
but they must meet state standards of safety 

NURSERY SCHOOLS are, by state law. inspected every three 
years. "I'd prefer yearly inspections," says Fire Chief William Kar- 
ch. If a school receives any Federal money, Federal law requires a 
yearly inspection. 

RETAIL STORES in the Nassau-Witherspoon area, in the Prin- 
ceton Shopping Center and along Route 206 — "there may be 
some we don't hit." the Chief says. These are done every year, too. 
FEDERALLY-FUNDED projects must have their locations in- 
spected- Besides nursery schools, this means Mt. Pisgah A. ME. 
Church, where there are Federally-financed senior citizen lunches. 
The Institute for Defense Analyses' old building was inspected, at 
IDA request, two or three years ago. The new building, although 
"Federally-funded," has not been inspected. It IDA asks for in- 
spection, firemen will oblige. 
...AND FURTHERMORE: 
"We don't inspect the University, but we've had very helpful talks 





EDUCATION: Can't start too young to learn 
about fire prevention. Tanla Vu, Riverside kin- 
dergartener, hears the word from Clinton 
Groover. 

with people there about chem. labs — there' ve been a couple of 
chem. lab fires — and they've explained to us the special 
problems." 

"We do have some areas of concern, like the Spelman dorms for 
example. They eliminated that service road that used to go off 
University Place, but we arranged different ways to get in. There's a 
fire-hydrant in the middle of the lawn there, and the University has 
promised to examine this and make an easier way to get our trucks 
in." 

"We're concerned, too, about cars in the parking spaces, 
blocking the way. But I feel confident the University is working on 
this. Clubs on Prospect, we inspect them, too." 

When housing or commercial developments are presented to the 
Planning Board, a fireman is there to tell the board whether fire 
trucks can get around a cul-de-sac, or whether the turning radii in a 
development's streets are adequate. 

What are firemen looking for, when they inspect? 

Exits. Are there enough, and are the signs clearly visible and is 
there a completely clear passage to the door? 

Electrical wiring. Enough outlets. Not too many extension cords? 

In places like schools, inspectors look into closets for stored 
paint and paint-thinners. and. of course, rags. Nursery schools are 
apt to have things like wooden blocks, lots of old rag dolls or card- 



START THEM YOUNG: School children learn at an early age 
what safety tips little people need to know. 

board puppet stages that could go up in a puff. 

Stores must have proper exits, too. And almost all stores share 
the same fire problem ~ how do you put merchandise on the 
shelves without blocking the aisles? This is particularly vexing for 
supermarkets, and firemen have admonished more than one to — 
leave those aisles clear! 

Shop-lifting has led some stores to block off exits in ways that 
make firemen very uncomfortable. One supermarket recently put 
up a low partition at entrance and exit doors to foil shoplifters. 
Firemen talked to the manager who has agreed to try for another 
solution that will keep merchandise out of pockets - and exits free 
and safe 

At a movie theatre where patrons were pushing through a pair, 
of doors into a crowded lobby without the formality of buying a 
ticket, the manager locked that door. 

Can't do that, said the firemen. So the manager took the outside 
handles off the door The door is now unlocked and safe for exit - 
but you can't get in from the outside. 

The basement cabaret room on campus was inspected, too. Its 
two exits make it safe, firemen found. 

On Nassau Street, a new motorbike shop caused uneasiness in 
the firehouses - all that gasoline storage. But storage has now 
been arranged differently and the firemen are satisfied. 

Sometimes people will encounter what they think is a bad 
situation, and they'll let a fireman know about it. Firemen always in- 
vestigate these complaints. 

In between, firemen check out hydrants around town to make 
sure they can be used if they are needed. They watch training films, 
reviewing the ways to fight different kinds of fires. Weather per- 
mitting, they go out for field training, especially for practice in 
driving the big trucks. 

And when necessary — they fight fires. 




HAIL TO THE CHIEFS: That's chief Fire Chief 
William Karch in the center. First assistant 
chief Anthony Krystaponis is at the left and 
second assistant chief William Anderson at the 
right. Chiefs and assistants hold their job for 
one year. Mr. Krystaponis will be the 1977 
chief, Mr. Anderson the top man tor 1978. 



Princeton Bank 

and 
Trust Company 



Princeton 
University 



LIGHT 

245 Nassau Street 



Institute 

for 

Advanced 

Study 




Ther's never a doubt 
about a La Vake diamond 



54 Nassau Street 



f LANDAU $ 

114 Nassau Street 
Tel. 924-3494 



Thome 

PHARMACY 

1 68 Nassau Street 
Princeton 



Hulk's 
Shoes 

Shoes for the 
entire family. 

1 40 Nassau Street 




SQUIBB 



Viking 
Furniture 

The best 

in Conternporary 

& Scandinavian design 

259 Nassau Street 



Nassau Conover 
Motor Company 

Ford-Lincoln-Mercury 

Leasing Daily. Weekly, 
Monlhly of Long Term 



vcro*i-">r*Tv:o~<v:iV*.v*v»>r-Tt>>'* 



DANCE CO-OP 
OF PRINCETON 



Multi-Media. Improvisatii 

and Choreography witt 

Frances Alemkorf 

2 Sessions Mondays 

7 30-9 pm. High 

Intermediate to 

Advanced 



Topics of the Town 




SAME 
DAY 

SHIRT 

SERVICE 

WASH-O-MAT 
259 Nassau St. 

Behind 

Viking Furn. 

921-9785 



EVERYTHING . . . 

FOR YOUR HRSPIACE" 



OPEN 

MON. 8 THURS. 

NITES 

'Til 9 

Doily 

10 A.M. 

TO 

5 P.M. I 



BOWDEN'S 




ROTARIANS HAVE GUEST 
From California. Anne 
Freudenberger, 15, of 
Claremont, Calif. was 
welcomed to Princeton at the 
regular Tuesday luncheon 
meeting of the Princeton 
Rotary at the Nassau Inn. She 
will spend the spring semester 
completing her junior year at 
Princeton High School, and 
then return to her home in 
California. In return, Prin- 
ceton High junior David Lidz 
has gone to Claremont as 
Princeton's exchange student. 

The student exchange UNIVERSITY HISTORIAN: Dr. Frederic R. Fox, Recor- 
between the Rotary Clubs of ding Secretary of the University, will speak February 
Princeton and Claremont is a 1 2 at 8 in the Engineering Quadrangle on Olden Street 
cooperative venture with i the on p rinceton University, describing Its contribution to 
Commission and the Rotary ,he community from its founding in the 18th century 
Claremont and Princeton *° ,ne present. Here he shows Mrs. Helen Woodward 
have been designated Sister of the Historical Society Lecture Series Committee, 
Cities for the 1976 Bicentennial sponsor of the event, a copy of a flag he and Mrs. Fox 
Celebration. designed for astronaut Pete Conrad to take to the 

moon. 

Anne was welcomed at 
Newark Airport by Pamela ecology, and disseminate firm of Geddes, Brecher, 
Hearne, who is the liaison information and knowledge Quails and Cunningham has 
between Princeton and obtained therefrom. 3) Serve re-designed the area to 
Claremont for the Princeton asa center for the education of provide the privacy needed for 
Bicentennial Commission; Dr. school and college students a health facility. 
Paul Chesebro and other of- and of the generalpublic with The agency's clients are 
fteials of Princeton Rotary, respect to environmental chiefly low-income and 
During her visit, Anne will live problems and issues and the marginal income women. Last 
with Rotarian The Rev. Mr. means of solving same year, 8,266 women used the 
Ronald Dyson, a member of through community and clinic. 

Rotary, and his family. Mr. governmental action, both 

Dyson is the minister of the administrative and judicial TWO ARRESTS RESULT 
United Methodist Church. Also, 4) Coordinate action to From Stolen Check. Two 
Daughter of a professor at the solve problems which do now m en have been arrested and 
School of Theology at or which could damage the charged after they allegedly 
Claremont, Ann was born in quality and stability of tried to cash a stolen check 
Africa and has travelled watershed ecosystems. 5) Thursday at the First National 
extensively throughout the Encourage all watershed Bank. 
United States, Europe, residents to participate in Allen Dunlop Jr., 38, of 
Canada and Jamaica. To pay solving environmental Mount Holly has been charged 
for her travels she earns problems affecting them at all with possession of stolen 
money baking bread, baby governmental levels, by property and attempting to 
sitting, house cleaning and exercising their responsibility obtain money under false 
painting houses with her to read, study, participate, pretenses. He was arraigned 
brothers. vote and act before Borough Judge Philip 

Special workshops and Carchman who set bail at 

TRUSTEES ELECTED programs will be held $2,500. 

By Watersheds Association, throughout the spring and 

The Stony Brook-Millstone summer for members. If Robert McCoy, 25, of 
Watersheds Association has interested in membership call Trenton, who police referred 
elected seven trustees : Clifton 737-3735. to as a "co-conspirator," has 

Bischoff , Earl Whitcraft, been charged with aiding and 

James Griffin, Lucius qpen HOUSE FOR CLINIC abetting, possession of stolen 



% V.T). LTD. 



Finest Collection of 

CLOTHING and ACCESSORIES 

tor the CONNOISSEUR 



KALAHA 

Cruisewear from Hawaii... Brilliant colors and 
designs in pantsuits, caftans and dresses. 



Tuesday-Saturday 10-5 

Closed Sundays 
'til Spring 



77 Main Street 
Kingston, N.J. 

924-1568 



The Pink Elephant 

252 Nassau Street 
Wine, Liquor, Package Goods 

OPEN 
10 a.m. -10 p.m. 

Bar, Cocktail Lounge 

OPEN 
10a.m. -2a.m. 

921-7444 



v~ 



Wilmerding, III, Gail Brent, 
Mrs. Peter Maruhnic, and 
Mrs. R.W. Hoedemaker. 

The purposes of the 
Association are: I) Develop in 
watershed residents an un- 



New Planned Parenthood P r °P CTt y and conspiracy to 
BuTdteg r^n^ State if the S^J" a cnme HlS ba " » 
Mercer area Planned M ^. 
Parenthood Association will 



He was arrested some three 
hours later at poli 



The Classic 

Cuff Bracelet 



.a**** 



- r^i^^T^rhat Squares,' when £"£ 
derstandtag and appreciation lrom 11. iv to t.tv so mai peared t0 make inquiries 
of the interrelationships visitors clients and potential aboutDun i op 

between man, other donors to a forthcoming fund » 

nraankmt; and thpir shared drive, can see what the new ,. ., . . nc .„ 

organisms ana meir snarea ■ . „ t Police were called at 1:05 by 

environment which must be quarters iook line. . _» «: c ; a i wn0 reported 

maintained to insure survival The org^ation provides **°f s ™^„ J^rso'n wS 
of aU species; and increase family plann ng medical attemDtin ^ t0 c £ sh a $500 
the ability to cope effectively services to all women of ^P^", 8 vteto? FasarieUa 
with problems which upset childbearing age in the ^ e ™ nd ^ L 
these relationships. 2) 6on- Mercer area, including xl£ investigation revealed 
duct and promote scientific *™«%J?V2' 3 mltmeXk tad been stolen 
research ,n the held of from pelvic and^breast f rom a woman ^ Trenton . 

diabetes, iron deficiency, 

venereal disease, pregnancy BAND TO BENEFIT 
and cancer of the cervix. With By Somerset Paper Drive. 
the additional space provided The Franklin High School 
by the new clinic, Planned Band Parents Association 
Parenthood hopes to extend its paper drive will begin Friday, 
services to men by setting up a February 13, after 6 p.m. with 
vasectomy clinic. curbside pick-up in pre- 
designated areas of 

The new home is 437 East newspapers bundled or brown 
State Street, the former Social bagged; bundled magazines. 
Security Administration and computer cards and 
building It was sold to printouts without carbon 
Plannerf Parenthood by its paper 
owner for $10 on the condition 

that Planned Parenthood pay Paper may also be brought 
back taxes of $25,000. A fund to the Franklin High School 
drive to raise this amount will parking lot on Saturday, 
be launched shortly. February 14, from 9 until 

The Princeton architectural noon. 




in sterling silver 
Elegant Simplicity 

Each bracelet is hand polished to a 

mirror-bright shine. 

9/16" wide $12.50 

7/S"wide $22.50 




nfoTQ 



BICENTENNIAL NEWS I 



By THE TOWN CRIER 
Box 1976, Princeton, N.J. 08540 



Woodrow Wilson lived al lour locations in Princeton At 72 and 82 
Library Place, he resided as a faculty member He lived at Prospect 
as president ol the University, and at 25 Cleveland Lane when he 
was Governor ol New Jersey. 

Graver Cleveland lived at 15 Hodge Road from 1890 until his 
death in 1 908 He is buried in Princeton Cemetery 

Albert Einstein lived at 112 Mercer Sweet lrom 1933 until his 
death in 1955 

Paul Tulane, founder of Tulane University, lived at 83 Stockton 
Street, now used as the resident ol the president ol Princeton 
University Tulane is also buried in Princeton Cemetery 




HOMEOWNERS: 



Get $2,000 

...$20,000 
...or more 

from 

HORIZON 

CREDITCORP 

Right Now! You can borrow against 
the equity in your home to 
• Pay off accumulated bills' 

■ Take care ol tuition expenses! 

■ Renovate your home! 

■ Use in business or any worthwhile purpose! 
Qutck. confidential service for secondary 
mortgage loans no pre payment penalty, no 
search fee. modest legal lee' 

HORIZON 




900 State Road (Rt. 206) Princeton. N J. 0S540 
For more information. giv« us a oolte 

9242725 



WH03 WHO 

ON THE LOCAL BUSINESS SCENE? 



Garbage b Trasti 
3 Removal: 

ft * 




WERCEDES-BENZ 

Service GOODWIN MOTO 
PORATION. 130 W 6fh St , P 
JO 75*3700 









Middle.., Foreign C.n, }II Townsend F»] Caterers! 












SCURTI JOE, SALES U»ed Can. I 1 ^ '1'V ? _ M . , , 

Bouoht.iold. traded, IromSJSOup 13ff c , c ■ . . f ? 


eonooe 


1 


So- Brood. Trenton 3MS51I Wh t/ ftn r« w'lrtl i. o 












«o'to',"i D "i'n' t "" P 5 '; U " ^"""a*"' DELI-DELITE Bullet Ci 


terlng 




3325 Spr 


M 








VOLK»«I» »„,„ J,,,, 4 J. rvk , WHITE OATE CATER 






Wr",»"ie V p.'' , !T"?.Vil»." C "" ''1 "'to" otrcVmpwe"" 






3Wi 









Your Neighbors Know- 



—AND 
THEY 
TELL 



- YOUR 
LOCAL 



CONSUMER INFORMATION BANK 

— admuustered bv and for local consumers and financed by Consumer Bureau Resislered 
SSESJEP'Mfe C £°° Se '° ADVERTISE - here or elsewhere - the tat thai the? are Tn 
our Register (Other Consumer Bureau Registered business people, who do NOT advertise 
their Consumer Bureau Registration and do NOT therefore contribute to support of Consumer 
Sb^.'^l^hSSSSS' ChSrge °" ^ C ° mple,e ^^^^'"ter-^ch 

J!ffia Movino& 

Li_£) Storage: 



8:30 p.m.: Friends of Music -' 

Concert, Shirlee Emmons, • 

soprano. Woolworth Center, h 

Saturday, February 7 3 

8p.m.: Film, "Absent Minded a 

Professor," starring Fred r 1 

MacMurray; McCosh 10,8 

University campus Also at o 

10 and 12. ? 

lp.ni.-lam: Dinner Dance, J 

15 p.m.. Back to School The Doctors' Wives Com- J 

ttee, for the benefit n 



CALENDAR 

Of The Week 



Thursday. February 5 



Luncheon for Sen! 

LitUebrook School Princeton Medical Center* 

7 "B^eauTless," F '<l, , r , ec-- e - rie ' S ' »«* Princet0n D ' 
Jean-Luc Goddard 



ceton Inn College Theater 
Also at 10. 

p.m.: Agenda Meeting for 
Borough Council; Borough 
Hall ^ 

8:15 p.m.: Re-scheduled 
meeting, Joint Recreation 
Board; Valley Road 
Administration Building. 

9 p.m.: Princeton Inn Cof- 
feeshop, Izmism: 

Progressive Jazz Rock 
Band ; Princeton Inn College 

Friday. Februarys 

11:30 am -3:30 p.m 
House, Planned Parenthood 
Association of the Mercer 
Area, 437 East State Street, 
Trenton. 

12:40 pm: Take-a-Museum 
Break Talk, Professor 



Bernhart on Yuan Painting. 7:30pm: Film Series, Alfred 
Hitchcock's "The Man Who 



Also at 1:40 
3:15 p.m.: Lecture, "Joseph 
Henry's Electrical 

Researches," Dr. Allen G. 



Knew Too Much," starring 
Peter Lorre; Princeton Inn 
- College. Also at 10. 
Shenstone; 301 Palmer Hall, a p.m : International Folk 
University campus. Dancing, led by Leo Arons 

7:30p.m.: Hockey, Princeton ~ 
vs. Harvard; Baker Rink. 
8 p.m.: Basketball, Princeton 
vs. Columbia, Jadwin Gym 



9 Tree Service: 



HTrack ft Traflw Remake 




directed by School. 

Prin- 8 p.m.: Basketball, Princeton £ 

University vs. Cornell; J" 

Jadwin Gym. "_j 

Sunday, Februarys ^ 

1 p.m.: Fifth annual Prin- 3 
ceton Indoor Relays; Jadwin Q. 
Gym. 5 

3pm.: Gallery Talk, Naomi' 
Chandler on A Chinese*? 
Hanging Scroll, Princeton 7 
Art Museum. 

3 p.m.: Friends of Musics 
Concert, Ann Sease- a, 
Monoyios, soprano;"^ 
Woolworth Center, 3 

University campus. S 

Open 5 p.m.: Slide lecture on 
Metropolitan Museum of 
Arts Islamic Collection, 
Richard Ettinghausen, 
sponsored by the Friends of 
the Art Museum; 101 
McCormickHail. 



■ HESM 



Monday, February 9 
p.m.: Public Library 
Board; Library Meeting 
Room 
8 p.m.; Meeting, Township 
Committee; Township Hall. 
8 p.m. : Festival of American 
Music, Organ Event I, 
George Markey and Eugene 
Roan; Bristol Chapel, 
Westminster Choir College. 
8 p.m.: Music-at-McCarter 
Theatre, Jean-Pierre 
Rampal, flutist; McCarter 
Theatre. 
8.15p.m.: Board of Education 
Policy Committee; Con- 
ference Room, Valley Road 
Building. 

Tuesday. February 10 
10a.m. -3p.m.: Mercer County 
Food Stamp Outreach 
Program; Red Cross 
headquarters, 182 North 
Harrison Street. 
.10:30 p.m.: Historical Society 
Lecture, Henry Lee Willet on 
"What's New in Stained 
Glass;" Pierce Hall, Trinity 
Church. 33 Mercer Street 
Preceded by coffee at 10. 
7 p.m.: Movies-at-McCarter, 
"Don't Cry with Your Mouth 
Full;" 10 McCosh, Univer- 
sity campus. Also at 9. 

7 p.m.: University Research 
Program in Criminal Justice 
lecture. Justice Robert Page, 
presiding judge, Camden 
County Juvenile Court, on 

"Sentence and Treatment 
Alternatives Available to the 
Juvenile Judge;" Stevenson 
Hall, 91 Prospect Street. 
7:30 p.m.: Hockey, Princeton 
vs. Army; Baker Rink. 

8 p.m. : Princeton Folk Dance 
Group; LitUebrook School, 
Magnolia Lane. 

8 p.m.: Faculty Recital, Lois 
Laverty, soprano, The 
Playhouse, Westminster 
Choir College. 

7:30 p.m.: Township Com- 
mittee ; Township Hall. 

8 p.m.: Borough Council; 
Borough Hall 

8 15pm Board of Education 
Planning Meeting; Con- 
ference Room. Valley Road 
Building. 
Wednesday. February 11 

7 p.m.: Discussion. Releasing 
Tensions Through Sound and 
Music, sponsored by Prin- 
ceton Sound Workshop; 
Murray Dodge Hall. East 
Room. 

8 p.m.: Chamber Music 
Concert by members of 
Princeton High School 
Orchestra; Princeton High 
School. 

8 p.m.: Joint Commission on 
Aging; Borough Hall 

8:30 p m : Friends of the 18th 
Century Seminar. "Marital 
Relations in 18th Centurv 
England." Lawrence Stone". 
Seminar Room. Princeton 
Inn College 



^1 Weekly Stock Quotations of Area Firms 

5 1 Monday Previous Monday 

Low High l«w High 

Applied Data Research 2% 2'j 2*» 2', 

United Jersey Banks 10% lo*» HWt, 10J 4 

Bid Asked Bid Asked 

BaselO H4 noask K "4 

Circle F Industries 2% 3 2' 4 

Datar.im I'* 2 '* "* JJ* 

SthDimension % ''» * ■* 

Heritage Bancorp 12'* 12*1 "M. 2% 

Horizon Bancorp 10'A "^ •> "J» 

Mathematica 2»/« 3% Hi *J4 

N J National Corporation 22'/» 23'/4 22V 4 23V< 

OptelCorp 1". Wt '*' *}» 

PennCorp. H «* 5% 6J4 

Princeton Applied Research 5(4 «'/4 S14 »V4 

Princeton Chemical Research 1 >, 2 1 V« 2V< 

Princeton Electronics P* 2'/i PA fj» 

Tizon Chemicals '4 1V4 *• Hi 

NassauFund(N.A.V).. 11.90 "• 8S 

The above Inter-dealer price approximalions are subiect io change without notice » 

Prices Provided by Princeton Office of Tucker, Anthony & R.L Day 

Andy's, Sports Fan's Haven Through the Years, 
Remodels Extensively with Eye to Family Trade 




Francis G.Clark 



BUSINESS 
In Princeton 



Should one tamper with an 
institution 7 

To its hard-core regulars, 
Andy's Tavern is an in- 
stitution, and any change 
would probably be anathema 



Bill 



ck Fa 



uHI.. 



member of the family which 
has operated the tavern at 244 
Alexander Street since 1946, 
has gambled that he can make 
a good thing even better. 

First, a little background. 
The exterior of Andy's is 
unprepossessing There is a 
cornerstone dated 1907 and the 
building looks its age. For 
many years, however, the 
inside has been a Mecca for 
the blue collar worker and 
sports enthusiast. 

There Princeton Univer- 
sity's triumphs and defeats on 
the gridiron and basketball 
court were reviewed and re- 
fought Inside, Butch Van 
Breda Kolff would hold court 
for the followers of the Tigers 
and Dollar Bill There was the 






NAMED MAN OF YEAR 
Chamber of Commerce. 
Francis G Clark, general 
ndude"r'olis,"cole ?ecretary of the Princeton 



shrimp in the basket with 
Andy's own cocktail sauce. All 
platters - served from 11 

i?»L 1 » P „H n «la i 3 ClUde r0 " S, ™" ™CA, was honored as "Man 
"We fed we've ironed out of J* W^ _dl£ng_tho Mth 

all the bugs now and 
ready to roll, ' ' said Jack 





I 
i 


1 


J 


Jack Fasanella 


Naturally 

orange neo 

"We 


Jack want 
i bulbs, 
tried eve 



annual dinner dance of the 
Chamber of Commerce. 
YMCA Board President 
Family Affair. According to William J Dettrnar and Ralph 

TnTLtenalaCrn^e JMfc*SgE5fi5 

Ker^uy^sTacfi've S %r°S 

known to all his friends as (*™. „„.,,i™„„. „„,» „„. 
"Uncle Joe" and Butch Van 
Breda Kolff are very good 

friends Jack said. Mr Clark has been general 

He himself was born and secret of „,, p^eton 

| raised in Princeton attended y^ s f nce mx Among hj, 

r t , 1 S ul i 5 2 h ^fnSSn? achievements are the creltion 
Cathedral High in Trenton, o{ U)e y , s j^ Progranv 

"Sports has been in my blood the radio show .. Youtn s ta 
long it s unbelievable, he v ., Droadcast over WHWH 



said 



for the past 13 years, and his 
financial aid to many 



easy camaraderie among manufacturer," he recalled. He was at Cathedral mine youngsters to help them attain 
friends who not only enjoyed "But we couldn't get orange glory years of 195M0, when ^ege educations "Youth 
their sporting verbal Jousts They had pink, violet, green- the Gaels were dominant on gp^Es Up " wiu air an j„. 
but some of the best shrimp, all kinds of colors -but no the basketball court "I think terview wjtn Mr clark on 
spaghetti and sandwiches in orange ." One firm suggested we lost only four games then. Sunday at7:30pm. 
town we buy white and paint them The senior class was 23-2. Past pres j(ient James 

There have been changes in orange, he said, but there was The first six men a Robson welcomed the guests 
the past few years. Basically a a fear they would peel So a received full basketball and introduced retiring 
working man's bar, Andy's, golden instead of an orange scholarships, he recalled, the chamber president Audrey C 
ambiance is one of the few first time anything like that Snort president John Lasley 
concessions Jack has made. had happened and then, a true presen ted Mrs Short with a 
sports buff, he proceeded to gj, t from (he members of the 
Between the dining room rattle off all six names Chamber and thanked her for 

and the bar area which seats "Princeton High always ^j. effort on behalf of the 
about 25, there is a shoulder- used to beat us in football and Organization and residents of 
Not the Usual Pin-ups. But high divider When he finds then I'd have to take a ribbing, the Princeton area. 

the emphasis on sports time. Jack intends to add but in a few months it would be 

remains strong There is a vertical slats so thereby basketball season and then it B ,, RBir , rF miNsriFAl FR 
large "Tigers NIT Champ preserving the sanctity of the was the reverse." »r im . iS 

1975" sim behind me bar bar When he can find the time, _*• G ™ eral I Ma i 1 »«£[- . 

Where TJ$ "m.S Why' We're hoping to at- Jack sa.d that he plans to fix W. Burbidge J, -.21 Prospect 
be located, there is instead a tract the family trade," said up the outside He also hopes ^f™!' "SmSSwAH, 
picture of the Princeton Tiger. ' 



with the collapse of the con 
struction trade in the state, 
has attracted more and more 
white collar workers for 
lunch. 



Jack. 



create an at- to resolve a "long-running 



he walls are mosphere where a family can feud" with Township officials ^fJ^th^vJZl, 
come in, relax and enjoy over whether Andy s is a nas joinea ine ciariagf 



schedules of the football and come in, relax and enjoy i 

basketball teams and, of themselves. tavern or restaurant 

course, a large, elevated color "People are shocked then 

television set in one corner for they walk inside They can't In the late 1940s, he ex- 
viewing the Tigers, get over how nice it is, plained, the Township passed 



Pontiac-Buick new 
dealership on Route 206 in 
Princeton. 
Mr. Burbidge, who has been 



The'sportsc'rowdsUll comes SpecTaUy people whoha'veiVt an ordinance prohibiting a active in car sales most of his 
before and after the games, been in town before " tavern from opening on ad 



Jack confirmed "If Princeton 

defeats St John's," he said Pizia Now. On the 

the day before the game, "this side, Andy's latest innovation closed as he battles 



Sunday Since then, Andy's manager in charge of sales at 
has been forced to remain Eldridge. 



he says he will "be offering 



.th of- friends and former customers 

place" wuTbe e a U 'ma1lnouse U, 5 is"the'Vnfroductio*n o'f'TtsTwn Mais' oWr" the definition of to visit him at Eldridge where 

they lose, there will be a lot of home-made pizza. In addition what constitutes a restaurant ht 

long faces (Princeton won in to plain, there is sausage, Meanwhile, the changes just 

overtime) It's amazing how anchovies, mushrooms, completed are such that Jack 

seriously they take the pepper and onions, meatballs hopes he has wrought the best 

games" and so on. "We have quite a of tw0 worlds: a nice 

variety," said Jack. restaurant for family dining 

For the past four and a half "Everything -- dough, and a bar still intact for the 

months, Jack has been sausage, peppers - is made old-time regulars - like the 

working 16 to 18 hours a day to right here. It's hard to believe one who raised his glass last 

effect one of the biggest the combinations they come week and said to no one in 

changes in Andy's history up with: a half of this and a particular, "Here's to 

Doing most of the work half of that. Of course, we're somebody!" 

themselves, except for wiring highly prejudiced but we think 



and plumbing, the Fasanellas it's the best 

have extensively remodeled Pizza, inside or takeout, is 

the interior. available from 6 to midnight 

A new kitchen, complete Monday through Thursday 
with stainless steel equipment and from 6 to 1 a.m. on Friday 
and ovens has been installed. andSaturday Towashitdown 
New chairs have increased the there are pitchers of cold beer 

seating in the dining room to 

50 There is new orange and Luncheon platters are 
black (what else?) carpeting carried right through the 
On one wall there is an im- evening Monday is chicken 
posing, 4-by-8-foot picture of in-the-basket; Tuesday, hot 
the Princeton Tiger. turkey and cranberry sauce; 
Wednesday and Saturday, 

Cold For Orange. And the spaghetti; Thursday, hot roast 
indirect, recessed lighting? beef; and Friday, its famous 



! cliff II MM >■■<>' 

|ilm(ojolll linlisl 
609 9213754 
I 609 655 4563 



The Cummins Shop 

Crystal, China 

924-1831 SS 




CENTER SPORTS 

Princeton Shopping Center 924-3713 



RAINIERI SILK SCREENING, PRINTING 

Silk screening on Textiles. Posters, Electronic 
Panels. Vinyl, Plastic and Metal. 
• Clubs • Fraternities • Con mentions mann 
Ml. Rose Rd., Hopewell 466-0530 ferS 



Craft cleaners 



924-3242 1 | 799-0327 | 



John W. Burbidge Jr 



WINTER NEEDS 

WEATHERSTRIP 
ELEC. HEATERS 

ROCK SALT 

SNOW SHOVELS 

BIRD FEEDERS 

BIRD SEED 

URKENS 

"Urken's Has Everything." 
27 Witherspoon St. 924-3076 




When It's Going to Be A 
2-Car Day With Only 1 Car- 
Look Us Up! 

It's easy to avoid problems on those days when 
one family car isn't enough like when he's 

going out ot town on business and she's got to 
go into town on errands. You can rent a beautiful 
new Ford Granada, a sporty Mustang or 
economical Maverick or Pinto 

Our Renl-A-Car rates are low and insurance is 
included Don't be caught short a car. Call us. 
We're right in the neighborhood. 



NASSAU-CONOVER 
MOTOR COMPANY 

Route 206, Princeton, N.J. 
(609)921-6400 



SPORTS 
In Princeton 



tie Tigers, scoring 12 in the fir- Saturday at 1 and Hamilton 
st half and ending with a Wednesday evening at 8. This 
game-high 20 Junior Oldham Wednesday evening at 8 they 
added 14 before fouling out were scheduled to play host to 
with 5:14 to play and Felix NotreDame 

Brown, who joined him on the 

bench soon after with 4: 53 left. Pinning is the name of the 
had eight. Shawn Craig and game and West Windsor 
PHS FIVE OUTCLASSED ?™ e Nunnery each scored scored seven in 12 individual 
By Trenton. 82-57. In what our P° ints matches to smother Florence 

was probably the final THS coach Fran Pinchot Saturday, 45-15. 
meeting between Trenton and substituted freely but there Scoring pins were Troy k 
Princeton High in basketball, was no let up in the caliber of Peck ' ln l - 33 - Glen Shipley ^ 
the outcome was the same as play when he did so Mike <4:46>, Keith Geisel (3:26), 1 
in al' the previous clashes bet- King and Earl Sutphin each Scolt Peet (2:51), Rudy | 
ween the two s-hools: a vie- had 14 for Trenton. Tim Zim- Wellnitz (3:01), Rich! 
tory for Trenton. The Tor- pieman and Arzaga Dillard hit Holcombe (2:43) and Chris! 
nadoes used their superior for ten each and Len Barber Holcombe (0:54) Ernie Rich, 
height and quickness to gun and Skip Hiller combined for 129-pounder, won an 8-1 
down a game but outclassed 18 more decision 

Two baskets by McPherson Mark Edenfield, Pete Slinn 
and baskets by White and and George Noble all lost 
Craig enabled PHS to outscore decisions, Noble just being 
Trenton 8-2 at the start of the edged, 9-8, in a see-saw battle 

final period to narrow the 

margin to 67-46 but a three- Another pair of victories by 

point by Trenton's Nate the Holcombe brothers led Busmen m Princeton 



PHS team, 82-57 

"I thought we played well in 
spots," said PHS coach Mar- 
vin Trotman after the game, 
"but we didn't have the 
overall firepower. We got five 
men; they've got 25. They just 
wore us down. 





Custom T-Shlrts • Stuffed Plush Animals 

102 Nassau St. 921-2191 



Chris Papaloannou 



thought ( 



• own foul shooting to 
ius." (PHS v, 
by Robbie 



Williams and two foul shots by WW to a 31-17 victory 

Dillard had Trenton up by 26 Ewing earlier in the week. coi.i™m iron, preewmg »g« 

again. Rich pinned Ewing's Darryl the same sales and service I 

Hi'vwi\.XTU'n\inuF Taylor in 2:37 in the 170-pound always have." 

F "ce Quaker™ . Friday A W and ChnS T l.^ M EWrid * Pr0VideS Sa,CS and 
,_.?:./ decision over Scott Allen, service for new Pontiacs 

2 4 - p o u n d Buicks and Opels and also has 

a large selection of used cars 

After West Windsor won the It has an extensive leasing 

with many options, 

itsownrepairshop. 



Other Sports 
On Pages 11B-15B 

..... . , , , couple of relatively ra 

We got into foul trouble victories last week over heavvweieht 

and you can t win like tha George School and Montclair- After West 

against a team like Trenton. I Kimberlv enabled Hun School .„, j . ,. 

«i«iht «..- ™~ f-..i -i .:__ wm ™ Ml 101-pound match by forfeit to progra 



right back. Bob Smythe 
decisioned Edenfield at 108 
pounds and Ewing ace Brooks 



CHEMIST PROMOTED 



hn'.Th 6 j f H didn .''. ^ rf ° r .T ~ mantown Friends on Friday. ThrooD "sooted"? maioTiM At s " , " ,b - Dr - chr ' s 

but they had a lot to do with it. The Quakers lost by only one Lcision o«r lohn Houter? ^P^annou of Cherry Hill 

Zl5ft3«M£: P" to PenningonLrlfer in ^7 nfpoJt^T^ ^^^Tf'^ 

Pennington is Blue Devils " a short .|f ved ls ™seareh mvestiga tor in the 

league play — margin department of organic 

dded that Ger- «™ i mm „Hi a .„iv r.«.i„«H chemistry at The Squibb 



super the season 
undefeated 
and Leete 



i us™ aoaea mat uer- yyw i mme diately regained ," ,' „t ' 
ntowns very small gym the lead as Geise ', sc J red a '"ftitute 



"always makes for a lot of 



earch, 



boards. They're just 

ball club, no question about it 

We're not on tneir level." 

The win was Trenton's 17th 
without a loss, Princeton's fif- „ 
th setback in 14 games £?%,?£&&££ ™JJ« Sacked™ r^ i-wrVnceVuie Road. 

Trenton used a press from there at 3:30. toreri a 3 ™ fall over N ick Dr Papaioannou received 

the start Trying to bring the Wednesday, Hun wUl en- S a t 129 oounds WeUnte £ BS de S ree '" chemistry 

tSmTA flshSni a r tai " Perki ,° m ( en "Y ? h M an^Nob.ew 9 on P d U ec d sionI e "'* SMffiSrtXSTW 

i igers meant tigntmg a league contest and this °t Athens in 1957. He served in 

thicket of arms and bodies Wednesday it was scheduled „„..«„.., the Greek Army, was em- 

everywhere. PHS tied the t0 p i ay host to a strong (12 LEADER ROLLS ON ployed in industry, and did 

game at 2 on a shot by Shawn victories) Rutgers Prep team In Men's Basketball research for the Greek Atomic 

Craig but Mike King fired in Tapoff for the Rutgers game League- Join t Effort, which Energy Commission before 

six successive points to give was scheduled for 3 30 last year went undefeated, has beginning graduate studies at 

the visiting Tornadoes as 12-4 extended its win streak to 21 Michigan State University in 

lead and Trenton was on its .. A little more steady play" games and is currently 1963 H e received his Ph.D. in 
way It led 26-17 at the end of in Lee te' s words and some hading in the Men's League organic chemistry in 1967 
the first period, 46-29 at the balanced scoring paced Hun to wl i h a 6-0 record. After a year as a post- 
half and 65-38 after three. a 76 . 61 win oVe,. V i s iti ng Both The Young n s and Bill doctoral fellow at Columbia 
Robbie McPherson was a George School Friday Hun Brown and Company have University, he worked for 
ireless performer for the Lit- jumped to a commanding 25-8 become stronger and now are three years as a research 
margin after the first period of m second and thirdfclace chemist in pharmaceutical 
play. Nick Brady's three Ivy Inn lost two important development at American 
baskets had sparked a 10-point games last week and has Cyanamid, and then for two 
spree by Hun in the opening dropped to 4th place. The Big years as a senior reS earch 
minutes 6 Green wiU play Joint Effort in chemist and group leader at 
Sophomore center Ron » " mu ? t g, 3 ™'' ™» week al the National Patent 
Payton led Hun's attack with Princeton High School gym. DevelopmentCorporation.Dr 




C. J. Skillman Co. 

Furniture Repairing 

Upholstery 



GLASS 




All Sizes and 

Thicknesses... 

Where and When 

You Need It! 

NELSON GLASS 
& ALUMINUM CO. 



45 Spring Street 
924-2880 



League Standings 



19 points and 14 rebounds; 

Brady finished with 12 and 

Terry McEwen and John _ . „,, 

Brady, 10 each. Ken Duvin Joint Effort 

had seven and four players all „ oun 8 n s 

had four BUI Brown 

Ivy Inn 

Although Hun scored the Kingston Wine 

first eight points (six by Youth Center 

Payton In route to a game" ft°" S 3? ,00d 



high 29-point performance) 



Montclair-Kimberly made a Ed & Comp any 
game of it for the first half. 

But "McEwen got us going 
in the third period with a 
couple of steals" Leete 
"and made it easy." 
blitzed the home -team 



Papaioannou joined Squibb in 
1973 to supervise the in- 
Pct termediates laboratory. 
1.000 J 

833 VICE-PRESIDENT NAMED 

714 At Sedgewick Printout. 

667 Ernest Archer, 87 Longview 

■GOO Drive, has been elected vice- 

375 president for programming at 

■200 Sedgewick Printout Systems, 

143 Route 1, a subsidiary of Data 

000 Courier of Louisville, Ky. and 

a computerized composition 

MASTERS RESULTS and typesetting organization. 

In Cranford Swim Meet. Before joining Sedgewick, 

iu Four members of the Pruv Mr Archer held positions in 

Hun ? eton Aquatic Association programming management, 

computer consulting and 



Hooper's 



A February Treat... 

Plump Blueberries in our 

Blueberry Muffins and 

Blueberry Coffee Cake. 

VILLAGE BAKERY 



\^ 



896-0036 



Masters who swim for the 

38-11, tafteftaalperiodtowii Jerse y Masters Team (25 and pro'gramming""~deveioVmen! 

89-65. In addition to his key over participated with some witn NBC News Elections in 

steals, McEwen played an all- 10 ° oth f r ,, l, i5 s ^ r f sw J mme ^ New York ci ^ ADDlied Data 

around game with 14 points a meet held Saturday a the Rese arch in Princeton and 

and seven assists. Cranford Community Pool Pacific Mutual Life in Los 

Tom Dillione added 10 more Competing ui the men s 30- Angdagi Calif . 

points for Hun. Mike Innocenzi 34 group, Sandy Thatcher, an 

5 and the Brady brothers ^^V^^f^ 3 AT RCA EDIT TEXT 

combinedfor 17. J™n ^^ersi^.Press, u ..Crystal .Dr. Pjng 

s , IRrF ~ TI]VIIF< - medley in 2:37 5, tied for first Sheng of 48 Murray Place, Dr. 

SURGE CONTINUES . ..' = n vard hackstroke Peter J. WojtOWicz, 721 

For West Windsor Matmen. " < he 5 ° Hl^JSEjiJ Rosedale Road, and Dr Eldon 

The West Windsor wrestling 2it v»?d butterfly^ 10S B Pnestley, 83 Oak Creek 

team increased its con- '„ rrt , M ara Duuer "y ana lu(v Road , East Windsor, are the 

secutive victory string to five y editors of "Introduction to 

last week with impressive T . s former LiQuia Crystals," published 

victories over Florence and ',!?_. "JtVala and now a D V Plenum Publishing Corp. of 

S?sn C ow5 h 2 2 en Ben,abeS me'X 'of teastTo'ph^cs New York All threa are 

team is now 5-2-2. rtonartmoni at Princeton members of the technical staff 

The Pirates will be at home & r srtv won the mvard »f RCA Laboratories, 

r two meets this wee„ ^f n ™ Vo a n d Sec According to the publisher, 
second in the 100-yard ^e unique optical electrical 
breaststroke in 1 :05.6 He electro-optic and thermal 

captured the 4044 100-yard 1LC " s) have 8 , k „,/If 
frXstvIe in l -3B 3 and the 'lOO electronic watch market, 
vari breaststroke in 2 02 6 wnile large-scale use of LCD's 

the women's 4549 200 DM in imminent . L qu d crystals 
3: 18.2 and took a second in the P™™™ <° * 'he f.rs dectro- 
, nn „ or rf hr.«i«imi.p with °P tlc materials to find 
widespread commercial use. 



for two meets this week 
playing host to Holv Cross 



X 



Lawrenceville, 



Fine Apparel far Men & Women 



I 1 



IT'nUN TO FEED THE BIRDS! K 

• SUNFLOWER SEEDS S 




• THISTLE SEED 

• PEANUT HEARTS 

• sun CAKES 



• ICE MEITERS 

TRACnONtTE SAND 

ICE GO - ROCK SAIT 



ROSEDALE MILLS 

Princeton: 274 Alexander Rd. 924-0134 
Pennington: Rt. 69 & W. Del. 737-2008 



Where can you go for real tire values? 

'"ASK A FRIEND 

about 

ftrestone 



§t 




4-ply polyester cord 

DELUXE CHAMPION 

AS LOW as 



18 



95 



*«« | "SS - ' iUmI 


fl'd 1 Toll 

21 9S 


is 


24 95 




27 95 
26 95 




L '8 lb 1 30 95 


106 



Firestone 

Windshield 

Washer 

Antifreeze ft Solvent 
Ready to use 
No mixing 

Reg. $1 98 



99 



gal. 




OBITUARIES 



Acorn of Durham, N.C. and 
seven grandchildren. 

The funeral will be held at 11 
Thursday at the Blackwell 
Memorial Home, 21 North 
Main Street, Pennington, the 
Rev Quinton Williams of- 
ficiating. Burial will be in 



News Of The 
CHURCHES 


PEOPLE 
In The News 



Charles Hayman 94, of 28 Memorial contributions may 
' ( l re . e ". St I^ t, . d !f dJa w Ua i>'?! be made to the Lakehurst 

Presbyterian Church Building r 'lnnV7s S frori 



Robert G. Gilpin. Jr.. 
professor of political science 



James H. Murphy, son of 
Mr. and Mrs. James Murphy 
of 267 Hamilton Avenue, is 
currently studying at the 
London, England, campus of 
Lawrence University. A 
graduate of Princeton High 
School and a junior at 
Lawrence, he is a government 
major. 



EXPAiNSION NOTED 
t Lutheran Chu 

n the Princeton Medfcal ^Jh^irian Chnrr*h"Ruiirii'n''o M «" D «- After hearing ^The Woodrow"wUson"School Jeryl Gopsill. daught 
; Center A native of Princess 2H ? y iininn HtaSc reports from all standing „f p^,, and international Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M 
■Anne. Md, he lived in the Lakehurst ■"■«■ committees on their activities MlaiTS ha S been invited to Gopsill, 92 Littlebrook Road 



3 Princeton area for 21 years. 



during the previous year, the participate in Project is "a member of the 1976 
utstanding musician, „,,„.„ „ wll n. m . «, of congregation of the Lutheran Know | edge 2000, a Bicen- Denison University Fellows 
if Mr Hayman was the first „ J* iVTJti.iL. Church of the Messiah passed tennial pro g r am which will Ambassador Program, which 
K . blaVmemter of John Philip ^^ S^h^frv 2* altS its largest budget, $60,915. £ nn |o V g the coun , rv 's involves goodwill calls on 

-.Sousa's famed marching K?,J£ m2K.i oil- A The congregation then voted to,ow\e<i%e needs for the next alumni She is a sophomore. 
2f band, traveling with it ex £S£rt5l toe Princeto farea "", accept thc r T rt °h^ 25 year^He will meet in April 
-tensively here and abroad He ^"'asfl) JeSrl he had Planning committee which and June with 350 lea ders ^„ Vendetti Jr ., 

g was expert in a number of '""« Das .' M ^J?' Vom provldes for "* set ,", ng ° f I <rom a variety of fields at the ™5*V „ d MrTjoto 
S instruments, pnncipally the J. et '"f iona n Tes t'g Sendee "I* if" C m f '."n" g °l'°T„n " Xerox International Center °" d ° e f tt ^ r of a "il Eldridge 
"trumpet, the trombone and the Ed .„'^ a i,,n f g i affile of the nex „' 10 y , ears X« J"" for Training and Management * n „,?i iSwrencevUle has — 

Ttuba pmiAp in IM9 there he centrating Evangelism efforts m LeSgurg V a. for group * v * nu ,.* ri^t SheDr^rd AFB Charles L. Brown of 55 

Q. Mr. Hayman was a retired College ' Vc he L of sc7en« r, ilhin . a 10 ; m ' Te r „ d ' US °' discussions on the generation, S ^"f ^om th? L IS Air Montadale Clftte has been 
<o emDlovee of the Horn and received a bachelor 01 science Messiah with emphasis on tr - n - mi .,j on an J use s of Texas ' lrom , ■„„"„ elected a v ce chairman and 
S H?rdar. restaurant Chi* in ^ree "> "* ln ?," ng ' been Princeton. The planning £SSdS "n the years to F ° r H ce . J&gft r T S «™^or of American 
§• Philadelphia, where he had Williams had a so been comrn , ttee invited seven other ;Ze conducted^ the AirT raj ni ng Te|epnone and Te legraph 

1- also belonged to the Chris J associatea wun ine «rn- 
£ Perry Elkl Lodge Marching strong Cork, Co .and later , 
* Band He was a member of the Brazl ' w,th both Johnson 
•2 M t. Pisgah A ME Church J T °^ r^J^J^^f °e similar or dissimUar SroveT Ave'nueT' have~been ** ■»"•! ' ^j^TwTS ~'mV" Brown joined the AT & 

singing in its gospel EL<*J>2£ World Warn, _^^ ._J ^med to the dean's list at £™J" Vendettas a 1975 L^es department in 

Moravian Cnlleee Bethlehem. I r ? au . a . t *. _S ■' awrel "- c ■» Cleveland at the end of World 




Command. 



being 



" g Cork, Co ^and later iri t harc ln jts fadings and to B k , „ k of p D 4 assigned to Cannon AFB, company's chief financial 

Z ,T with both Johnson & „, how their situations may and n,bor«h L Pehta 74 NM ■ for *5* . wlt £ a "" „? officer 

won and the Firestone be similar or dissimilar S^*2™L t - h.™ hJn the Tactical Air Command. ««»_ ioined um AT 4 



chorus 



he was manager of the Rubber 



He is survived by his wi/e. [SSjIffiSn Corporation 
Anna R Hayman; 



... addition, the p'annmg Moravian College, Bethlehem, g. 
committee recommended that p f the faU f erm They ,„ School North 
Messiah Church ascertau; both freshmen 



Manos, Brazil 

daughter, Mrs Margaret " e % T^^^L^! B» needs tor an upgraded 

Mann of Philadelphia; a SCtete D dS' ff' 11 ,,! 1 !"" 1 " "^T' Air force L.eutenani 

brother, Oliver J. Hainan of XiXmSlKe^pSkuti Senwiebert a nationally, colonel Warren W. Foster, son 

Princess Anne, Md\ ; two 0" d ^ S o °L K B n gietSand of k TH archltec 'v wU ' *°I k of Mr. and Mrs. LeBaron R. 

sisters, Mrs. Ida H. Gold- M ,f w °^ ge t So sisterT two ^th the congregation tp study Foste ^ Pr0S pect Avenue, 

sborough of Easton, Md. and ™lwauk ee t WOIUU rs tm (he sltaa hon. The planning ta ^ en ^ to Eielson 

Mrs Fannie M Moaney of ^ t ( J!. , ?• and seven gran * committee hopes to be able by AFB A|aska s for duty as 

Baltimore, Md.; 12 grand- '"SuV"- rvice wi „ be he i d J«ne of this year to present director of operations and 

children and nine great- F JZ y [t 2 in Trinity th T ee "^"""'k? P ' anS '° training. A 1952 graduate of > 

« d e£was sch^uled g££f*£gS ^emsS^JincK ^g.-g.S^JIS^-J^ 

. to , , rh. te s. w sss y *" , M , :E" K»g >ga psriartsaa F r c m, fo D T n c ed P fo r s i ain th het 

Church, the Rev leon Gibs™ ^^IcTmbT f FunTral P lan t involving in ' ernal n^mS^ffttlC 
rn" ,C, t a h t e ng F n „l, e n r tarn nlW L , 1 lw b ^ ttL*lMl[l.TSl --'ions; andsomethmgin MrComma0 ^_ 
Cemetery, Trenton &2tSlMC J* ^^pa^lSe &&& fi."=B 

Miss Mary Agnes Ciahan. Association. assistanteto the pastor As a ^tal in ,he 39th annua7l!Sf 

change of policy for the Angeles Bach Fes tival at the 
ma K. Jacob. 80, comln 8 academic year the FiI | t Congrega , iona | church 
ry 28 at Mercer congregation has applied for a Frjday plrtfcipants in these 

Medical Center Formerly of '""time vicar concerts have included the 

Princeton, she lived in „rTimi?<i atcrmimarv leading organists of this 
Trenton for the past two L J^Xy nd W ed ne ^a Y y. country and Europe 



82, of 45 Chestnut Street, died 

January 30 at Princeton M . 

Medical Center. She was a .-"J j 

lifelong resident of Princeton. 
Prior to her retirement in 

1958, Miss Callahan was 

employed for 45 years as a 

secretary 

University. 

She is survived by her 
sister, Grace A. Callahan. 

Mass of Christian Burial 
was celebrated at St. Paul's pHSon^^Tuehter^M^ in the Campus Center 
Church, with burial in the ™" C *°V S, ;, Ml ! f Auditorium of Princeton 



Princeton X.*?^** 



member of 
the Hungarian Reformed 
Church, Trenton. 



The Rev Dr. Robert M. Grant 



Max Holmes. Lief Erickson 



Cleveland at the « 
War n and held Long Lines 
assignments in a number of 
cities before being named 
general manager of the 
central area in Cincinnati in 
1962. He was elected vice 
president, then president of 
Illinois Bell in Chicago and in 
1974 was elected an executive 
vice president of AT 4 T. 

A collection of folk tales 
compiled by Alvin Schwartz of 
50 Southern Way has been 
cited as a notable book for 
young people by the National 
Council for the Social Studies. 
The book is "Whoppers: Tall 
Tales and Other Lies," a 
collection of hyperbole from 
American folklore which was 
published by J . B . Lippincott 

George R. Scholten of 9 

1 Wallingford Drive, Empire 

Airman Donald R. Johnson Divis j on mana ger for Johnson 

II. son of Mrs Carmen H. and Johnsons Health Care 

Johnson of 114 Spruce St has Divis j on in Morristown, has 

-pleted Air Force Basic won company sales honors He 




~«T j ii. i. -ii . i J IBBI tlOlineS, L.1CI J^l lUiauil , .». _ „, . _ .,• > »c*D Willi VWUIIUU bbwb uwiuib. u« 

will deliver two illustrated Avenue G riggstown, received training at Lackland AFB. was recenUy presented the 

Wife of the late Eugene A, lectures on From Cultural certificate of commendation ™* ■ _*,.*. «, orf _»« h _ Eastern Region Trophy in 

Jacob, Sr . she is survived by Accommodation to Per ffom his rind , a( Franklm A 1975 graduate of Princeton reco gnition of his outstanding 

a son, Eugene A : Jr oil «™ «g " H-*™^ D r - Zr «W Sch ~" * ou^nding « Sd W. he s remaimng sales achieve ments. 



achievement in the PSAT's. 



Chalverus of 



Con- w illia 

"tributions may 

ESSES 6- -»KBSBBBifi 

of Los Angeles and five 



cemetery Con- penn^'ton" a brother' Julius Theological Seminary on 
? 6 I&'.X Kovac?of Hamuton h | q ua J r l e';1 Tuesday at 7:30 and Wed- 



Rescue Squad. 



invited 
Dr. Grant is a professor at 
Edward Acorn, 68, of g "K .JS was held at the the Universi ty of Chicago 



Lakehurst died February 2 



Divinity School, with which he 



LanniUiMUiaircuiumjiiii Fu/ino fVm#»t*irv Phanol in UlVUUiy OCllUUl, wiui wuiui lie 

Paul Kimble Hospital, | w "J ™2 MemorUd has been ass0(:iated since 

I alcohnr^l Rnrn in Patterson ^ wln g. 1 OWnsmp. memorial .„., . ororti.nto of Iininn 



Lakehurst. Born in Patterson, 



1952. A graduate of Union 



Lmiciiuiai. Duiuuiroiiciwii, Contributions rniv hp made to """■ " B' auualc "' <- 
he lived in Pennington for 25 th e SSriTr Reformed Theological Seminary 
years before moving to r h ,.„h„?Tr.ritnn Harvard University, he is an 

Lakehurst nine years ago murcnoi i renton . ordained minister in the 

Mr. Acorn worked for the Protestant Episcopal Church 

New Jersey Bell Telephone Thomas J Spelman 56 of and served a pastorate in 
Co for 44 years and at the 510 SouUl Ma in Street Pen- South Cleveland, Mass. before 
time of his retirement was njngton died January 29 at his entering upon his teaching 
commercial staff supervisor, home after a long illness. Bom career. 

He was an elder in the „ Philadelphia, he had lived 

Lakehurst Presbyterian in tte p en nington area for BULLETINS 

Church, and past president of m any years The Parish Council of St. 

the Pennington Lions Club, the Mr Spelman was a former Paul's Church will meet 
Pennington YMCA and the executive staff representative Monday at 8 in the Parish 
Men's Bible Class of the for t he United Rubber Hall. 216 Nassau Street. The 
Pennington Presbyterian workers, AFL-CIO His last public is invited. 
Church. He was also a employment was at the Neon 




at Lackland for specialized 
training in the security police 
field. Professor Oskar Morgen- 

stern of 94 Library Place has 

Prof. Charles F. Westoff has been awarded Austria's Great 
been appointed director of Gold Medal by the Federal 
Princeton University's Office President of Austria at 
of Population Research. He ceremonies in Vienna. A 
replaces Prof. Ansley J. graduate of the University of 
Coale, who will take on duties Vienna, Mr. Morgenstern 
as associate director, the helped set up in that city in 
position vacated by Prof. 1962 the Institute for 
Westoff. Advanced Studies which 

Prof. Westoff is a specialist specializes in the social 
on U.S. fertility and sciences He was Director of 
population policy. He is the the Institute for the academic 
author, with N. B. Ryder, of year 1965-66 and is a member 
' "The Contraceptive of its Board of Trustees and 
Revolution," to be published the scientific advisory com- 
<} soon by the Princeton mittee. 

i University Press, and has 

I authored or coauthored seven _...__ . „„ 

■ other books on population and Richard H. Harwood. 23 

written numerous journal Honey Brook Drive, is the 

grtides principal nominee for a 

vacancy at the Air Force 

Dr. Sydnor B. Penlck, ^ e ^ °- f - Sen : Cli£ ? ord .?• 



—• -y r ■ ■-- -• -- - employment was ai ine r«eon ___ , . , ivennem vv. sieio. no ut. syanor d. renicn, r ... (B - NI , hnsed on the 

member of the McCulley Tavern in Trenton, where he Hall Parker, a member of snowden Lane, has been Acting Director of the Prin- ™f, ' "„', "± '•JSS f%™ J™ 
Chapter of New Jersey BeL was a bartender the AU Saints' Church Choir named vice-president and ceton House Unit of the S^-!h™ ™iS2f,^T22 



P , I °, De€rs „ He is survived by his wife, and a student at Westminster national sales manager for Medical Center, will be a fP™ K*|,S SrfiS 

He is survived by his wife, Mary Drew Spelman, and his Choir College will give an Pee l Street Wine Merchants of speaker at a seminar to be E ! lcan ^ ,"*. "£ S„ „„,/„: 

Ruth Giesen Acorn; a parents, Mr. and Mrs Michael organ recital Friday at 8 at AU New York and San Francisco, conducted at the Ankora State fw™ p«nr?nJtnn hiThZZ 

daughter Mrs Ruth Clowes of ^man, an of Pennington. Saints', Terhune Road. Calif . H e had been vice- Hospital, Hammonton, on °™Sl iTKStVw K 

Pennington; three sons, The service was held at a „ ,„ ~. .president in charge of sales Wednesday His topic is: "^f^tefor ?he II S Mer 

Edward H. of West Grove, Pennington funeral home, the Paul Eaton, studen at f or ^e eastern and southern "Medical Management of Sm»h !jS™» 

Pa Douglas R of RockvnJle/ RevT t omasC Ryan of St. Princeton Theological divisions of the company. Alcoholism" chant Manne Academy 

-i and Donald G of i am « nom.n Catholic Seminary, will lead " 



Reaville, a brother 




Roman 
Sil Church officiating. Con- worship at Christ 

| tributions may be made to the Congregation, Walnut Lane 
American Cancer Society, 88 and Houghton Road, " 



NEW HOMES 
ADDITIONS 

REMODELING 

and 
CARPENTRY , 



Hopewell, N J 
466-2980 



Lake Dale Drive, Trenton 



LAMP SPECIALS 

Repaired, polished, wired 
Vases or an objects mounted 
on wood or metal 

3 or more lamps 

20% Off 

ANTIQUE SILVER 



20% Off 

lampshades custom made 
ss copper and silvet 
polished and lacquered 

METALCRAFT CO. 

lerly Trent Handy Shop) 
2546 Pennington Rd. Trenton 
at Pennington Circle 
737-1109 



Sunday at 10. He has been with 
the church this year as a 
minister-in-training. 

The Catholic Daughters will 
sponsor a Valentine Day party 
for the patients at the Prin- 
ceton Nursing and 
Rehabilitation Center on 
Quarry Street on February 14 
from 2 to 4 Members are 
urged to attend and to bring 
gifts and homemade cookies 
to the regular meeting 
February 10. 





7?<W ■>' 




c 


F °f R g? E co 




76. for Cr>« *e«r. -g 
>lthi MM p« - 


737 7JT7 


S3 


3 

-sill 



ON ONE BEAUTIFUL ACRE of dogwood, holly, fruit I 
grape arbor and flowering shrubs sits this 6 r 
B4 baths and a full dry basement Hopewell Township 
location $49,900. 



NEW LISTING $33,500 is the low price 3 lovely bedrooms, 
large eat in kitchen with pantry, carpeted living room, bath with 
7 ft vanity and double sinks. Move in condition 
your appointment 

DO YOU NEED 4 OH 5 BEDROOMS? Is your price range in the 
low aO's -5 Would you like to live in a lovely neighborhood in 

Ewmg Township'? Call us Your inspection is invited. 

Pennington office Rt. 31 737-9200 




CALL«4-3»*I 



twentleT 609 Wl. 1773 


land S100 plus utilil 


;„.-,. 


"iOMSfl. 


K ££Krtr:", 


r2 


£'I 


'K/SSJKSKt 


500 ,«°; 


sues 


.yu< !,.■ ',U '''/. -r:d\ 


n. *37S 


Ca, 2?2l 


■SKMSUKSiJf 


3137 i 


SBfi 


\V£l, ?„°„^"°^ m rV h 5 e"v'eco™ 



|i. SKILLM AN FURNITURE 

* Local and New Jersey State Moving 
■6 Used Furniture: Chests, dressers, unfinished bookcases etc 
6 SPECIAL OF THE WEEK: Mahogany drop-leaf table and 
selection of 5-piece dinette sets. 

Hours: Monday thru Friday 8:30-5, Sat 8:30-1 

212 Alexander St, Princeton 924-1881 





SMALL LAWRENCEVILLE ESTATE 

Fascinating Tudor with large living and dining rooms; 
playroom, billiard room; den. eat-in kitchen, master suite. 5 
more bedrooms. 4Vi baths; 4 fireplaces, glass and screened 
porch, pool, tennis court, dog run. gorgeous grounds; double 
lot; quiet area $185,000 




PRETTY AND PRISTINE 

Immaculate center hall Colonial m pleasant Grover's Mill area, 
close 10 commuter's train, minutes from Princeton Foyer, 
living and dining rooms; large eat-in kitchen, family room with 
fireplace, 4 double bedrooms. 2Vi baths Handsome, extra- 
large, secluded patio Pine grove a-growing 1 .$77,000 

SHADYBROOK CAPE COD 

on quiel street, easy walk to lake, boating, skating and crew 
watching' Warm, cheerful 4 bedroom, 2 bath Cape Cod, nice 
living room, fireplace, dining room; big kitchen, eating area, den. 
GREAT rec rmi Beautilul old trees AVAILABLE FOR IM- 
MEDIATE RENTAL $88,900 



ACRES -nearly three 

BEDROOMS - seven & bathrooms four (hideaway alop garage) 

CLOSET SPACE • some you can walk info 

DEER - birds and pheasanls too 

EASY to love & to maintain 

FAMILY room with tine fireplace 

GREENHOUSE for springtime in winter 

HEAT - zoned, and air conditioning too 

IRREPLACEABLE al this figure 

JAPANESE CHERRY irees and flowering shrubs 

KITCHEN - a masterpiece with copper hood & barbecue 

LIBRARY - study tor creative thinking 

MASTER BEDROOM suite - first floor but secluded 

NEIGHBORHOOD par excellence 

ONLY a mile and a hall lo Palmer Square 

POOL is cool and totally private 

QUIET private lane m western Princeton 

RECREATION room ripe tor merriment 

SECURITY - solid with dog run for good measure 

TOWERING trees bring a touch ol t-i-m-b-e-rl 

UTILITY room - neat andcomplele 

VIEWS - and big picture windows to frame them 

WINECELLAR and wel bars (2) to whel your whistle 1 

X-TRA LAND lor lennis court - real or paddle 

YEAR-ROUND comlort and eye-appeal 

ZERO - well, almost - defects 

JUST REDUCED to $167,500! 




REAL 
ESTATE 



K-M- 

LIGHT 



PERFECT PRIVACY 

3ts m the pretty town of Pennington 
Solidly built of stone, this perfectly maintained 3 bedroom 2 
bath home offers spacious rooms, quality workmanship, many 
extras Secluded lot. sheltered by pines $88,500 

OLD BARN. NEW HOME 

Let us show you how fine materials, skillful workmanship and 
imagination have restored and transformed a fine old 18th cen- 
tury barn into a home of distinction Preserved is the best of the 
past, added the conveniences of today Take drama m the airy. 
lofty family room with its brick fireplace wall reaching up to the 
14 foot beamed ceiling, in the balcony-bridge separating vet 
connecting the master suite and children's bedrooms Add for- 
mality in living and dining rooms, cozmess m the study 
panelled in old barn siding, and efficiency in the up to the 
minute kitchen Preserve and expose the original beams and 
antique strap hinges - 
Result, an intriguing home on a wooded country acre 

New on the market at $197,500 

OVERBROOK RANCH 

Attractive three bedroom, two bath ranch Living room-dming, 
ell with corner fireplace, good kitchen, hide-away den Han- 
dsome redwood deck overlooking the pretty sloping grounds. 
Early occupancy, and just $72,000 

Cooperative Listing Sen ice 

Princeton Real Estate Group 

Mercer County Board of Realtors 



Realtors 247 Nassau St. 609-924-3822 
Karl and Pat Light, Brokers 



Constance Brauer 

Marcy Crimmms 
Cornelia Dielhenn 
Marge Owyer 



Toby Goodyear 
Charlie Greathouse 

Seideniiitck 



Nancy Kramer 
Janet Matteson 
Tana Armour Money 
Stuart Mmton 



I 



1 



lUTOIVIATIC 
ALARM 

Reliable. Inexpensive 

Security Systems 
Call Ed Matthews. 921-7921 



Need An Early Copy Of 
Town Topics? 



You 



buy I 



fice. 4 Mercer Slreet Wed- 
nesday mornings alter t 1 and 
a! Princeton newsstands af- 
ter 12 





rif in HoofWI 


fjjyjj 


NTCD, tor 


ft 


3grE8} 


E „^:f 


l\ZIX£ 


* 


SK N 4r*JS3 




gs'saj 


ff 


"" SY > L ." N ;° 






1 


Tre 13751*00 


BEDROOM ap». 




,ei*if,=n"ril 


J2S8! 


uSi 



LARGE 3 BEDROOM 
RANCH with 2 

fireplaces, den and walk- 
in cedar closet 

$65,000 
NEW 3 BEDROOM 
RANCH WITH 2 fire- 
places on 1 V* acres 

Mid 70s 

Call us -466-2800 

May Agency 

Rciiltor • Insurer 

Smmsth mtm Primitmaw 
Rt BIS, Blawenburg 



JUUUUU uu uouuuuuu u 



l_l l_l u u uuu t -J 'i 



" Even/thing clicks 

at Colony Oaks 

Vou'll toast your toot! luck when you live at Colony 
Oaks, the most chic new place in the Brunswicks. Con 
temporary 1 and 2 bedroom apartments in a beautiful 
selling. Includes heat, hot water; balcony or patio, a,i 
conditioner and more. Complete recreational facilities 
now beme olanned for the site. 

from $275 to $375 \, 

Dlrecllons Route 1 norm j»/t is 

f K- 



Flnnefjans 

rnpflni i <■""■ B) 






166 Nassau Street 
Princeton, New Jersey 
Telephone: (609) 9244350 



INSURANCE 

We represent these companies: 

AETNA INSURANCE 
BITUMINOUS CASUALTY 
COMMERCIAL UNION 
CONTINENTAL INSURANCE 
FIREMAN'S FUND - AMERICAN 
HOME INSURANCE 

We provide Automobile, Home Owners. Tenants 
and Floater coverage with these companies. 

CHARLES H.DRAINE CO. 

I Realtors Insurers 

166 Nassau Street Princeton 

Call (609) 924-4350 Always! 



l' spayed Shepherd 




Firestone Weal Estate 



1 73NASSAU STREET • PRINCETON. NEW JERSEY 08540 

609-924-2222 

REALTORS 

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK 



Marylou Roche 
Joan Grander 
Donna Reichard 
Betty Fish 



Anna Mae Bach 
Johanna Friedman 
Carol Caskey 

Robin Smith 




^et amid beautiful old pines on a lovely cul-de-sac in Riverside, this versatile multi-level 
conolial is light and spacious throughout. The ettractrve black and whfte tiled entry foyer leads 
to a bright inviting living room, a formal dining room, and a large modern eat-in kitchen Just a 
few steps away is e substantial family room with raised hearth end a study or guest bedroom 
suite wfch full bath. Upstairs are three good seed bedrooms and two full baths It boasts , 
roomy basement, a two-car garage, and an outdoor barbecue, and I 



-mile walk c 
bike-nde to town, lust three blocks to the New York bus - a truly outstanding. convenient_of- 



$90,500 




On a Parkside in West Windsor 
Parkside enioyment with convenience is the keynote of our newest listing in West Windsor 
Township This immaculately kept colonial offers a front-to-back living room, formal dining 
room, spacious family room with sliding doors to a patio, a bright and cheerful eat-in kitchen, 
and four comfortable upstairs bedrooms, including a generous master sute Large in size, it is 
moderately priced. It's convenient to commuting on the Penn Centrel (eight minute drive] and 
to continuing educatran and fantastic recreational facilities at Mercer County Community 
College. Excellent public schools, a very pleasant neighborhood and a super location. If you have 
promises to keep, show her this house first 



£63.500 




B^ B 



A Charming Pennington Colonic 



This brand new Firestone listing is charming throughout, from the large living room with 
fireplace to the formal colonial dining room, with a neat modern efficient kitchen nearby Up- 
stairs are four delightful bedrooms and potential space in the walk-up attic for more, if it suits 
your fancy Come sit on the large screened-m side porch this spring, and watch Pennington 
come into bloom. A cream puff at $59,500. 




About to be Built on a Lovely Wooded Lot 

This quality built ranch is about to be built on a beautiful lot in Montgomery Township From 
the slate foyer, and raised living room with picture window, to the exceptional modern eat-in 
kitchen and family room with raised hearth, you'll find an exceptional layout and a tasteful use of 
materials There are three bedrooms and two full baths in all. plus a two car garage, 
basement, and many features you wouldn't expect in this price range You won't find as much 
house elsewhere on a wooded lot at this price $64,900 

Montgomery Rancher On Three Acres 

So new to the market that we couldn't get a picture [due to the blizzard}, the three bedroom 
country ranch is |ust what you've been waiting for. A beautiful lot with flowering fruit trees and 
plenty of room for the kids to roam Be the first to see it 



RealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRealEstateii 



DRAINE 

REAL ESTATE 




gFtealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRealEstateRRaEstate. 



ITlffl^'!W1MrilM l ilffi™ mulu ^ lululu1E ^ 




Adlerman* Click & Co. 



est. 192 7 



Realtors — Insurors 




]5 Spring Street, Princeton, N.J. 

Evenings and Sundays 924-1239 



586-1020 



Anita Blanc 
Phyllis Levin 


Hazel Stix 
HennieSherm 


Dan Faccini 




Ros Greenberg 
Ann Raffaelli 
Barbara Pinkham 
Karen Trenbath 
Lots Fee 


Dorothy Krame 
Joan Alpert 
Florence Rose 
Michael Tic kto 



Members: Princeton Real EsUle Group. Multiple Listing Service. Global Natl. RE. Referral Servl 
Our Competent SUff Can Show You Any And Every Home In The Area . 




CHARMING COUNTRY ESTATE - Hand hewn beams 10 open 
hearth fireplace and ultra modern kitchen are characteristic of 
tasteful blending of old & new 9 Room main house, carriage 
house, barn, pool on 75 acres of fields & woods 




GOURMET'S DELIGHT - We have just listed a marvelous 
home nghi m Princeton wiih all the ingredients for perfect 
family living Got your pencil 7 Here's our recipe 5 spacious 
bedrooms and 3 lull baihs, lovely L/R, D/R, and Contemporary 
Kitchen, Full basement with finished study and laundry, yum- 
my family room with fireplace Top notch location and con- 
dition Blend all the above and enjoy the taste of-real living at 

$96,000 

WHAT YOU'VE BEEN LOOKING FOR - If you've been biding 
your time waiting for that certain something to become 
available - THIS IS IT' This L-shaped Ranch was built by a 
builder for his own use, and the quality shows Three 
Bedrooms, Family Room, 1 Vi Baths, full basement - 2.200 sq 
ft in all See for yourself our newest listing at $63,900 



EXCELLENT VALUE m ihis lovely home in West Windsor 
g room with fireplace, large panelled family room, 

separate dining room, eat-in ktichen, four bedrooms, 2Vj 
s central vac two-car garage Ideal location for the com- 
, r $67,500 





LIVE IN THE HEART OF PRINCETON - walk to schools, 10 
Nassau Street, to the Shopping Center You'll love this char- 
ming doll house with two bedrooms, bath, living, room, dining 
room, kitchen., all on one floor Sel up shop or laundry in a full 
many-windowed basement Furnish a guest room or study in 
the linished attic brightened by dormers II adds up to a cozy 
patio, full basement, self-cleaning oven $98,000 



THE VIEW FROM THE TERRACE, rolling fields and trie 
Sourtand Mouniains are Nature's gift, to the owners of this 
colonial home The cathedral cerlmged living room is 
dramatized by a huge, raised hearth fireplace A library, a 
panelled family room, a formal dining room, a roomy, well plan- 
ned kitchen plus a guest powder room, complete Ihe first floor 
Upstairs, there are four large bedrooms & 2 bathrooms A 2- 
car garage, central air and a full basement are all to be ex- 
pected in a home of Ihis calibre but there is also room for a 
lennis court on Ihe 2 acre lot $100,000 

GRIGGSTOWN - Farm property and investment On 46 
beaulilul acres Has mam building with 4 apartments, cottage, 
large barn, 4 car garage Excellent condition Takes farmland 
Asking $225,000 




A REAL BEAUTY - in a superb setting ol hills is this new, mar- 
velously arranged 2 story quality colonial Very spacious 
rooms and many special features abound including 2 level 
patio, full basement, self-cleaning oven A house to see and 
just reduced to $89,500 



ALL THIS AND PRINCETON, TOO - Our Center Hall Colonial 
Split features a Living Room w/Fireplace, separate Dining 
Room w/doors to a generous and private back porch. Kitchen 
w/breaktast area. 4 Bedrooms and 2Vk baths Extras include 
Central Air Conditioning, dry basement. 2 car garage & fenced 
yard $64,900 




ROOM FOR EVERYONE m this 4 BR Cape Cod Two large 
bedrooms & 2 full baths downstairs & 2 bedrooms & 1 full baiii 
upstairs No fighting oyer who gels the bathroom first in the 
morning 1 Living room, separate dining room and FR with FP on 
the first floor - plus a big eat-m K & laundry room Convenient 
to NY bus. 10 mm. to Pr Jet Close to Kingston & Princeton 
Centrally A/C All for $66,900 

DOUBLE HOUSE IN PRINCETON - A marvelous investment 
property or live in one side and rent the other Each side has 
two bedrooms. Irving room, kitchen, one bath, a full basement, 
m good condition and centrally located Just reduced to 

$29,500 




VE HAVE LAND and several lovely lots in Princeton and v 



nity 

$16,000 
$40,000 
$12,500 
$63,000 



MM 

PRINCETON WALLFLOWER DESIRES COLONIAL 
RESTORATION BUFF - 1 am a potential charmer in the center 
of town wishing to meet an enterprising young couple I ramble 
up and down from one room to another, buy my old pine doors 
are painted over and my two fireplaces are papered over I still 
have my wide hall, living room, family room, a dining room with 
a door to the back porch, a kitchen, and a full bath downstairs, 
and two rooms plus a study and a bath upstairs If you love old 
homes, we could make each other happy Asking $42,500 
COMMERCIAL PROPERTY - Princeton Boro - Valuable cor- 
ner location Stores and apartments Poteniial income totals 
$2,470 per mo Solid masonry building is in excellent condition 
Asking $260,000 

OUTSTANDING PROPERTY FOR PROFESSIONAL OR COM- 
MERCIAL USE - We have a very fine 2.400 sq fl building m 
perfect condition strategically located minutes from downtown 
Princeton ideal for medical or dental offices 1 



This i: 



i the tram s 



WHAT MORE COULD YOU ASK FOR? • Immaculate, A 

Bedroom, 2W Bath Colonial Central Air, Fireplace, Patio 

professional landscaping are just some of the 

great neighborhood and very convenient 

Priced at 

SAY HELLO TO A GOOD BUY - A 2 apt h 

Princeton which makes sense for the inve 

who wanis one floor living with tenant to cc 



$67,900 
the center of 
for someone 
its $42,500 




PERFECTION IN PRINCETON - Looking for a carefree home a 
tew blocks from town' 7 We have a gem on one of Princeton's 
most desirable streets This small but impeccable home has a 
lovely living room, dining room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms and en- 
closed breezeway on one level The roomy upstairs is now a 
comfortable bedroom - but could be a perfect studio for an ar- 
tist Every inch of this home has been beautifully decorated 
with taste and total comfort in mind Come see this delightful 
home and the grounds designed by a top landscape architect 
$72,900 

COUNTRY LIVING at a low price - This fine 3 bedroom ranch 
only needs decorating to be your dream home Large lot with 
good landscaping. All city utilities Walking distance to school 
$36,000 




SPREAD RIGHT OUT - Does anyone need 5 bedrooms 
Ideally suited for a large family, this Elm Ridge beauty set way 
back from the street on beautifully landscaped grounds will 
suit you to perfection Has a country kitchen, living room with 
fireplace, separate dining room, family room, study , game 
room, and 3Vfe baths Central air conditioning and a superb kid- 
ney-shaped 20' x 40' heated pool On 1 V6 acres In apple pie- 
condition Asking $108,500 

DUPLEX • Buy both or either side One side has 4 Bedrooms. 
Full Study, Large Living Room, Separate Dining Room, 1 Bath - 
$35,000. Smaller side has 2 Bedrooms. Kitchen with Dinette, 
Living Room & Large Porch - $30,000. Both $63,000 

PRINCETON HUNT 

IN THE LOVELY Grovers Mills area of West Windsor 

2 Spacious Exciting Models 

4 bedrooms. 2'/z baths, panelled family room, separate 

dining room, full basement. 2 car garage 

FROM $64,900 



lable lo Qualified Bu,e 
rdge, make first left Cr; 
'egerRd to models 

MODELS OPEN SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS 

PRICE INCREASE COMING SOON 



80 percenl-25 yr Mortgage 
Take Rt 571 over Princeton J 
bury Rd , for approx 1 mile Lef 



ONLY 1 LEFT - Modern Store Excellent location, center of 
town -Approx 1200sq ft 

RENTAL - Large home in Princeton Lovely area. $550 mo. 

RENTAL • LARGE NEW 2 story Colonial in Montgomery Twp. 
4 BR, 2'/iB. LR, DR. Kitchen, lovely FR. 2 car garage $675 mo. 

NEW COMMERCIAL LISTING • PRINCETON BORO. One 

Story building, with 1 .200 sq ft Asking $1 60,000 

ON ROUTE 130 IN E. WINDSOR - Prime commercial property 
with good building and excellent frontage ■ for stores, 
restaurant or offices Call for details 




W WINDSOR - Well built rancher with 3 
Bedrooms and 1 Vi Baths on beautifully lan- 
dscaped lot. Extra features are plaster walls, har- 
dwood floors, fireplace, patio, rec. room, garden, 
vineyard and small orchard. $57,500 

BUCKS CO., PA. - 1976 is a perfect year to buy a 
rare home from the past, an 18th century stone 
manor house with electric, plumbing and heating 
redone. Just recently papered and painted inside. 
Beautiful fixtures and antique box locks are just a 
few of the extras. Close commute to Phila., NY. 

E. AMWELL TWP. - Privacy on both sides of the 
road are what you will get with this modern ran- 
cher on 7 wooded acres with brook. Very large 
living room with a Franklin stove, fireplace in the 
DR/FR, large kitchen area are just a few of the 
features of this lovely home. $82,500 

HOPEWELL BORO - REDUCEDMIExtremely well 
cared for home with 8 rooms and 2 baths, within 
walking distance to stores, churches and school. 
This home is now used as 2 apartments. $54,000 

HOPEWELL BORO - This home has four good 
sized bedrooms, 1Vi Baths plus living room, 
dining area and kitchen. Full basement and one 
car garage are included for $42,000. A good buy if 
you'd like to live in the Hopewell area. 

Member Mercer County MLS 

Licensed in New Jersey and Pennsylvania 

»ooeo caB C Dr: p aoBB gB°g° BPQO 



HIGH GROUND - LOW HOUSE all on one floor 
and solidly built of brick by one of Princeton's best 
builders - four bedrooms - panelled library. 

$135,000 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP four bedroom Colonial 
with air conditioning, carpeting, on a wooded acre 
lot. $75,500 



PRINCETON - PRETTY BROOK ROAD -- on a 

large wooded lot in such a superb location, a great 
bin family home with just about everything. 
u ' $179,500 

PENNS NECK three bedroom traditional design 
with larqe living room and "extra nice" property. 

$62,500 



Beverly T. Crane 
Judy D. Weiss 
Ted Kopp 



FEATURED NEW LISTINGS 

in the last two weeks sold immediately! 

921-1550 

JaneB. Schoch 
MIcheleG.Hochman 
Bent Marshal 



MarjorieM. Jaeger 
Amy M. Raynor 
Tod Peyton 



Realtor - Member Mercer County Mo 



1 Real Estate Groups 



J 



HUNT & AUGUSTINE, INC. 

Custom Homes Bedens Brook 

Building Lots 

One to three acre building lots overlooking 
Bedens Brook golf course All utilities, including 
sewers. Varied and beautiful settings. Financing 
available 

Oftlce Rentals 



Pennington Professional Center; distinctive and 
unusual office rentals. Estate setting, quiet elegant 
atmosphere, yet one block from center of town, 
bank, post office and stores Ample parking. 

Available in single offices, suites or separate 
buildings. Close proximity to 1-95. Princeton, 
railroads and airports. 

Custom Building 

New homes, alterations, aditions and kitchen 
remodeling. 

Call William W. Augustine 
924-901 2 or 924-2345 



^^ 



^"* 



LJLJ 
LID™ 



HOUGHTON § 

Real Estate 







NEW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY 
OR BUSINESS-RESIDENCE 

We offer this terrific opportunity in a rapidly 
growing Township, so conveniently located to 
Princeton at 404 Princeton Road in Plainsboro. 
A ; 2 story structure with aluminum siding on the 
exterior, 2 car detached garage. 
On the first floor - currently complete with car- 
peting, panelling, drapes and powder room. 
Second floor - A large apartment with roomy eat- 
in kitchen, separate dining room, living room, 2 
bedrooms and study or 3 bedrooms, bath and 
screened porch. Rented for $250 per month. 
Equipped with separate electric meters and fur- 
nace is in excellent condition. 
Full basement supplies good storage. 
Ample sized property for an addition if needed and 
excellent parking facilities. Low taxes! 
Zero in where the opportunity is now! Call for ad- 
ditional information $79,900 



rUUO CallSWDOTa 



JOHN H. HOUGHTON, Broker 



IB 



Barbara Ellis 
Margarela Schenk 



MLS 



Free Parking - Palmer Square Park & Shop lot 
Member Multiple Listing Service 



• FABRICS 

• DRAPERIES 

• SLIPCOVERS 

• FURNITURE 
REPAIRS 

DEWEY'S 

Upholstery Shop 
6-8 Slauon Drive 
PiiuivtwiJuiiftioit jgga 
799-1778 C3 



Sometime before 
1700. Barefoot Brinson. 
Sheriff of Somerset 
County, opened a 
trading post near the in- 
tersection of what is now 
the Princeton-Kingston 
Road and Rocky Hill 
Road. And around 1700. 
when Princeton (then 
Stony Brook) was begin- 
ning to take form as a 
settlement. Jediah 
Higgins arrived in the 
area from Piscataway. 
(People came to Prin- 
ceton from Piscataway in 
rather substantial num- 
bers long before Prin- 
ceton-Rutgers football 
and basketball games.) 
The fertile land around 
Stony Brook and the 
location about midway 
between New York and 
Philadelphia made rapid 
growth a natural oc- 
currence. By 1701. 
stagecoaches were 
stopping in Kingston to 
rest both passengers 
and horses. In 1 704 the 
settlement was given the 
name "Kingstown" and a 
year later a wooden 
bridge was built across 
the Millstone River fur- 
ther increasing traffic 
through the area. 

Jediah Higgins pur- 
chased 1.000 acres near 
Kingston in 1 709. making 
him one of the most in- 
fluential property 
owners. Among the 
other prominent early 
names associated with 
Kingston are Gulick, 
Woolf. Bastedo. Hays. 
Lake. Van Note, and 
Bayles. Joseph Hewes, 
who would sign the 
Declaration of In- 
dependence as a 
representative from Nor- 
th Carolina, was born in 
Kingston in 1 730. 



Handsome Colonial on a quiet slreet in a fine near- 
by South Brunswick neighborhood. Both the 
house and the neighborhood will provide much to 
enjoy $74,500 



Excellent 1 9-year Vd home in Hopewell Borough 
has two unusually fine .""partments. Modern and in- 
cluding such features as a 2-car garage, it is ideal 
as either an investment property or for owner- 
occupancy $69,500 

A particularly good floor plan is one of the 
highlights of this 10-room, 2'/2 bath Colonial in 
West Windsor. Among the others are a fireplace, 
central air, and finished basement $78,000 

Gracious Colonial on a Princeton Township cul- 
de-sac. Classic center hall design with beautiful 
appointments. A delightful combination of charm 
and convenience designed for low maintenance 

$127,500 

Immaculate Sherbrooke Estates Colonial, with 4 
bedrooms. 2Vz baths, fireplace, and central air. So 
convenient. $72,500 

Nifty 3-bedroom ranch house in Princeton Town- 
ship has a bundle of features and a most appealing 
lot $75,000 

An excellent buy today and one which will be 
even more appreciated when summer comes. It 
offers 9 rooms, 2'/2 baths, 2-car garage, plus an 
in-ground pool surrounded by mature lan- 
dscaping. Quiet street in a convenient West Win- 
dsor neighborhood. 

Princeton mansion and a full Borough block offers 
a great deal of potential. Available for sale or rent. 



^KGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKf J KGKf J K(,Kf,K(, S 




King's Grant is the Exclusive 

Local Representative for Homerica, 

The Nation's Leading Home-Finding Service 



PRINCETON TOWNSHIP 

This superb brick and frame colonial is situated on 1.44 acres in 
one of the nicest neighborhoods of Princeton's Western Section. 
From the entrance drive the house appears to be a handsome 
Cape Cod. Once inside, as our floor plans indicate, handsome in- 
teriors open and overflow into one of the most spacious homes 
in the area. It is the family-entertaining house "par ex- 
cellence." 




LOWER FLOOR PLAN 



HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 

A well maintained and compactly arranged house on a half 
acre in the desirable Princeton Farms area. Colonial in 
design the house has many desirable features: unusually 
spacious family room with fireplace and gourmet kitchen 
with breakfast area. Upstairs are three normal sized 
bedrooms with two full baths plus a stupendous children's 
dormitory bedroom. The house is centrally air conditioned 
and gas-fired, hot-air heated. A new King's Grant listing at 

$75,000 

RENTAL Allentown Borough 

center hall Colonial. Large living room with fireplace, 
large dining room, country kitchen, laundry room, 4 
bedrooms, 2 full baths. $400 per month 



Thinking of selling your home? 

Will you be relocating in another area? 



KING'S GRANT REAL ESTATE of Princeton represents 
HOMERICA, the coast to coast homefinding service. We can 
help you sell your present home, and/or find you the right 
home in another area— whether across town or across 
America. 



And when looking for a home... 



The properties listed here are but a sampling ot our many offerings 
throughout the entire central New Jersey area. We welcome your 
inquires at any time to our listings. We have full data including house 
plans for your information. 



if 

G H 




MAIN 



PLAN 



From the four bedrooms and double bath nestled under the roof 
to the enormous party playroom down below, the house is ideal 
for the active family. And next Spring you will additionally en- 
joy the Sylvan in-ground pool set in magnificently landscaped 
gardens. Yhis fine offering is now being listed at $149,500 



KING'S GRANT REAL ESTATE 

S. Serge Rizzo, Licensed Broker 

New Jersey and Pennsylvania 

Anne Brener Kahn 
Janet Monk 



Wendy Hall 
Thora Young 
Leigh Overton 
Alexandra Punnett 
Jane Waters 
William M. Punnett 



Jfo-t&ib 



IC.1 



Helen Smith 

Mary Lanahan 

John A. Cr oil 

Yota Switzgable 



KGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKGKC,K(..M.M. 

■ 

— U>Hm 



.. OLIVER SAYLEB 



5 'H 




TOWNHOUSE I 



MIRY RUN 
APARTMENTS 

Live in a secluded count-y 
type atmosphere overlooking 
a charming creek Starling at 
$200 Fully carpeted, washer 
and dryer and central air con- 
ditioning in each apartment 
Open every day except Sun- 
day 

Phone 586-1881 

Quaker Bridge and Brook- 
wood Roads, Hamilton 
Township 
Executive Style furnished 

from $250 



ujl.i.jl»'» i .m.I/X*IaX>i.jl.i..l.i.j..:.x.:..i.^ i» t «i» u * 



iSfSfcJSi 


nT:\> 


U4 N. 




"ij" 


E's 


■*£; 


l 


■ 


I 


'"«™ a { n ,X,'TZ"A c °S 


SNOWPLOWI 


g£ 


<D LOC 




'?# 


CABINETS. 


£; 


i£ 


;: 




JAOUA., 


SS 


T^t"'* 


:;,"»' 




201 57?2S?7 




Apar Iments C 


«B0 and up 
11453 WO 


0° 


i 


ROOM FOR RE 


!K 


rs? 


..^ 


E 


Wi CHEVY P 

10. v» ton will 


BS 3tf 


uspension, 


;:."'! 



PROFESSIONAL PAINTING 

SAVES! 



Consult 



J-CTLITTS S. GROSS 



Experts In Interior and exterior painting 
and paper hanging. 



Princeton, N.J. 





STEWARDSON-DOUGHERTY 

TZiol Eiimu vfiueiaui, Imnrftrttd 

366 9(aiiau Strut, "Princeton, 2(ra Jcrity 08549 

*PSo*t: 609-91 1 -7784 



Too New (and Too Cold!) 
for Pictures 



CONTEMPORARY MULTI-LEVEL in the Littlebrook School District. 
Quarry tiled entry hall, spacious living room and dining rooms, kitchen 
with breakfast area, five bedrooms, three full baths, plus family room, 
utility room, raised deck for entertaining Two car garage. Two zone cen- 
tral air-conditioning, lots of wall to wall carpeting. $98,500 



ON THE MILLSTONE just below the Lake Dam interesting 
Mediterranean style house. Step down living room and dining room with 
nine and one half foot ceilings, panelled heated sunporch, kitchen, 
master bedroom and bath. Two bedrooms, tiled bath and storage on 2nd. 
Lower level family room with fireplace and bookshelves. Marvelous 
sloping lot to the water with patio and boat house. $82,500 



t 



TO PRINCETON REAL ESTATE CALL 
921-7784 



Anne H. Cresson James B. Laughlin Georgia H. Graham 

Robert E. Dougherty Julie Douglas Betsy Stewardson Ford 

Toby Laughlin Frltzle Moore 

William E., Stewardson (1935-1 972) 

Realtors 

Represent*^ Previews Executive Home Search 




I 2 Bedroom j 



$270 

I For Immediate Occupancy 

I All apartments with wall to 
wall carpeting, blinds, ap- 
Iphances and central air 
conditioning 

I Steele, Rosloff 
and Smith 

I Realtors and Insurors 

■ Members of MLS 
•609-655-0080 
609-448-8811 





Rossmoor Condominium - 2 
bedrooms, 1 kingsize bath with laun- 
dry, spacious living room, dining room, 
kitchen, enclosed patio, lots of closet 
space. AND there is a lot more to tell 
you about - give us a call! 

$38,500 



Just Reduced! Our lovely two story 
colonial in "Riverside" - 4 bedrooms, 
2V4 baths, living room with fireplace, 
dining room, kitchen, family room, 
finished basement, screened porch 
and swimming pool! A Fantastic Buy... 

$89,000 

- -:5s 




rai HI 



I jPIP^ 






Victorian "doll house" on 3 acres in 
Lawrenceville. Four plus bedrooms, 
2'/2 baths, living room with 
fireplace and Chestnut beams,, dining 
room, sun room, breakfast room, kit- 
chen with grill and hand-painted 
Spanish tile. Also a two car detached 
garage with a room above it. A Very In- 
teresting Property! 

$126,000 



m 



REALTY WORLD 



You can see OUR houses in OUR OFFICE 



REALTY WORLD/Audrey Short, Inc. 

163 Nassau St. 
Princeton, N.J. 921-9222 



FERTILIZER SALE, SOY SCOUT I 
TROOP 41. Door-fo-Door February 3 



'jTtf *rr P o* L( n?* P B? V F ° R $ * LE: V *" * TT ENTION SINOLE ME 



C&Opi special Teen 



1":;: 


IMil^MI 


p 


SsiSSlS 1 


BK 


^Baunssr,; 


KHHWH 



N. C. JEFFERSON 

I 



30 Nasuu Bldo . 



FOR RENT 



OHice space at 252 Nassau 
1 Available shortly 

Modern offices, air con- 
led. reasonable rates 

Parking available 

Call lor choice space 
924-61 84 or 921 -7444 






FIVE BEDROOMS 



N.T.Callaway~ 

REAL ESTATE J 

4 NASSAU STREET ■ PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 08540 
921-1050 

THREE DIMENSIONS 

Large, Medium, Small 
FOUR BEDROOMS 



PETE CALLAWAY 
CONNIE FLEMING 
ETHEL FRULAND 
ANNE GALLAGHER 
JUDY McCAUGHAN 
CHARLOTTE MCLAUGHLIN 
TERRY MERRICK 
BILLROEBUNG 
rtlLLA STACKPOLE 
ELEANOR S YOUNG 



THREE BEDROOMS 




MatTT^arJH^TTTTJr^T^^^rT^T^^^ Large treed lot - flagstone garden room - Nelson 
Two acres - swimming pool - top Princeton area - Ma,ure landscaped lot - brick walled terrace - * , nr , tinn fam hiinn ranrh 

stunning brick colonial. $160,000 convenient Princeton location - picture book H.dge location - rambling rand 

house. $118,000 



$96,500 or rent $600 




fcf>-- --f%S 



Five plus acres - barn - tenant house - Pennington One and one half acre - dogwoods - excellent Small lot - mature trees and shrubs 

area - fine old Colonial. $155,000 township area - brand new colonial. $138,500 Pennington - cozy Dutch Colonial 



village of 
$65,000 




Six plus acres - heated swimming pool - con- 
venient township location - attractive con- 
temporary $199,500 



One plus acre - Williamsburg colors - pretty as a 
picture - Montgomery colonial just reduced. 

$72,900 



Acre of trees - three fireplaces - charming & 
unusual Bedens Brook contemporary $1 49 . 500 



Member Princeton Real Estate Group and Mercer County Multiple Listing 



JAMES V.TAMASI 




DOERIER LANDSCAPE 




Pumbmg & Healing 




Designing- Contracting 




Contractor 




9 Gordon Ave. 




Princeton Junction N J 




Lawrenceville 




799-1494 




924-1221 





ARCARO CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC. 
Builders and Contractors 

Residential and Industrial , 
120 Cherry Valley Rd. 
Princeton 

924-5779 or 466-3352 




APARTM 


E>TFO 


RENT in P 


neon 


1300 Car 


vriiS 


"i,:Vp k m B 


** 


1RIOCSTOWN CI 




JiM 


NCOME 


TAX P 




H: K 


§3 


Z,"S. 


Van Dyke R 


ifolJtf- 



OFFICE PARK AREA 

PRINCETON PIKE- Approved condominium type, 
research, engineering, development buildings to 
be built lor individual ownership or lease. Building 
to be adapted to your needs. 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 
CARTER ROADApproved 1 '/t acre building lot in 
Elm Ridge Park area. 

DEAN REALTY 

Realtor 882-5881 



14 So. Main Street 



Pennington, N.J. 



£ COOH, 



c/own and Country [Real (bstate 
7370964 8960266 

TRULY MAGNIFICENT is this stately authentic 
brick colonial shaded by maple trees and ivy 
covered walls Living room, dining room, opening 
out lo brick patio. Cozy kitchen, many pantry and 
storage areas, plus wet bar. Antique brick 
fireplace in den. Five bedrooms, two and one half 
baths. Screened porch, carpeted. Enhanced by a 
dramatic 'fountain nestled among pachysandra 
and myrtle beds. $1 25,000 

CHOICE OF THE COUNTRY GENTLEMAN: 20 

acres of valuable land in the Harbourton Hills. A 
large house, 4 bedrooms, three baths, and maid 
quarters are just some of the many fine features of 
this house. $97,000 

HARBOURTON: A very large Georgian colonial 
on two and one half acres. Rural setting, ideal for 
the large family. Five bedrooms, three baths, 
family room on first floor for mother and dad, large 
recreation room for the children downstairs. Both 
with fireplaces. Quality construction and careful 
planning with eye to low maintenance Reduced to 
$148,900 

YOU'LL ENJOY YOUR HOME MORE if it is well 
built, large and roomy, such as this classic Cape 
Cod in Hopewell Township. Five bedrooms, two 
and one half baths, family room with fireplace and 
wet bar. Walk to schools and shopping. $69,900 

NEW LISTING near Pennington, 3 bedroom Ran- 
ch with 26 ft. family room, fireplace, view of Har- 
bourton Hills from the front porch, pleasing yard 
for the avid gardener $54,900 

DISCOVER THE JOY of watching the birds and 
wildlife along your own private wooded sanctuary 
in Harbourton. This new listing is a new brick and 
cedar Colonial Cape with a living room with 
fireplace, study. 2 bedrooms, 1 with a Franklin 
stove, family room and bath. Upstairs are 2 
bedrooms and room for another plus a bath. Many 
extras. $87,500 

LOVELY OLD VICTORIAN HOME on one of 

Hopewell's nicest streets. Stained glass window in 
foyer, living room, formal dining room, eat-in kit- 
chen, family room. Four bedrooms and bath on 
second floor. Landscaping includes 1 7 varieties of 
holly, Japanese grand flora, and Redwood trees, 
to name just a few $69,000 




DORMER'S TILE 

i Ceramic Tile • Floor Coverings 
i Rug Cleaning • Painting 

Princeton 924-0365 



FOR RENT 

Retail store, Princeton central business 
district. 600 sq. feet plus full basement. 

Gall 924-0768, 9-5 



E TOMATO FACTORY 



'Km 


McrS:Up 


r 


HnTarKlMI 


s 


Jpm 


• 10 lh.rc 


"" 


sev Wl 9B30^ 


»• 


ll'°r 


lh"g«" 


;;';" 


"•Vp'.m'TS 


H 


^aswffa«B4S 


FOX 


RUN S 


»>L 


ET: 1-B.dr. 


.. 


",',"." 




,10, 


"."""im""'! 




S "* C , 




MB* 


JSSiKSS 


„;„° 


Tl' 


«;s 




ZSE&Z 


i 


LOWE 


«"'«« 


T. 


SM43.1W7 12 


s 


DOWNTOWN P 


T 


ETON OFFl 


' J - 




, ■., .,'v/ 


|ni 


1-2 


?t 




ssr 


tvJ 


ITTJ.t 


r 


,.'.'r.r 






»■«•». 1! 


v 


FKEE 




> m 


n.7w M k..A 


so 


V..H, ■ 


._.,„.. 


V: 


MO 931 7239. 1 


"I 



DID YOU KNOW? 

That We clean Some of 
The Most Unusual Things? 

Fine oriental rugs 
Needlepoint & petit point 
Fabric covered shoes 
Stuffed animals & dolls 
Pfliows— recovered & renovaed 
Leather articles (clean & dye) 
Pocketbooks & evening bags 
Cloth-type museum pieces 
Afghans 
Tyrolean shorts 
Berets 

Banners & tlags 
Sleeping bags 
Upholstered furniture 
Yes, even your great-grand- 
mother s wedding dress 





Route 206 State Road Princeton, N J 08540 

Station Square Route 206 Belle Mead N J 08502 

183 Franklin Corner Road Lawrenceville, N.J. 08648 

924-7575 359-6222 




COVERED ENTRY: STRIKING LOCATION 

4 bedroom with entry foyer, bright living room, formal dining room, 
panelled family room, kitchen with breakfast area: Central air. basement 
2 car garage, paved drive. Bacy yard enclosed in landscaping. $70,900 




STAUNCH BORDER OF WHITE BIRCH 

enhance this 2-story in a cul-de-sac location with a clear view of rolling 
hills to one side, the other an established neighborhood. Balconied foyer, 
4 bedrooms, 2V4 baths, panelled family with raised hearth brick fireplace 
and built-in bookcases, formal dining room, full basement, 2 car garage, 
paved drive. $76,000 

SET HIGH- VIEW IS ONE OF the most striking in the total area! 

Brick and Cedar 2-story with brick fireplace in panelled family room, 
slate foyer, front to back living room, formal dining room, 4-5 bedrooms, 
full basement, 2 car garage, belgium block curbing, underground utilities. 

$99,500 

Two Immediate and Very Reasonable Sltuatlons- 

2-STORY DESIGN with foyer, brick fireplace with personalized mantel, 
master bedroom with walk-in and full bath, 3 other bedrooms, panelled 
family room with box beamed ceiling, wooden planter, central air, newly 
decorated. $62,900 

EXPANDED RANCH with covered entry, toyer, sunken living room, for- 
mal dining room, dinette in kitchen, dishwasher, recessed lights , 5 
bedrooms, 3Vi baths, basement. 2 car garage, central air $59,900 

Please call us if you can top this home. 

921 -7943 or 921 -8038 



HILTON 



REALTORS 
REALTY CO. of PRINCETON. Inc. 




THREE BEDROOM SPLIT LEVEL near the 
Princeton Shopping Center. Great for a 
small young family or retired couple. 



m 



$64,500 

194 Nassau Street 921-606(1 

Member of Multiple Listing Service 



Two acres of high wooded land not far from 
the day schools Owner will help finance for 
a qualified buyer. $35,000. 

A small, cozy, 2 story frame house on a 
quiet convenient street in the Borough. With 
the double lot and two-family zone, it could 
be expanded to a duplex or bought with or 
without the adjoining lot at $64,000 or 
$46,000. 

Brand new and beautiful in a very nice sec- 
tion of Montgomery Township with a Prin- 
ceton address. 4 bedrooms. 2Vi baths. 

$85,000. 

An attractive Princeton Township eight year 
old Thompson Colonial with 1.35 acres in a 
country setting. 5 bedrooms. 3Vi baths, 2 
car garage plus dog run and 2 storage 
buildings. Living room with fireplace, study 
with fireplace, family room with fireplace. 

$135,000. 

A gracious two-story. 3 year old Colonial 
with five bedrooms, 3'/: baths. 2 fireplaces. 2 
stairways, 2 zoned heating system and cen- 
tral air-conditioning. $154,000. 

An extremely attractive beach house in one 
of the nicest areas on the Jersey shore. A 
full width open deck gives a beautiful view of 
dunes and ocean. Call for details. $1 85,000. 

A truly magnificent remodeled barn with 
careful use of materials in keeping with Early 
Ameican handcrafted structure blended with 
all the modern conveniences. One acre plus 
of protected land. Just over the Princeton 
boundary in Montgomery $197,500. 

Princeton Township Country estate - 
delightful setting - 1VS story - Baughan 
custom designed Colonial 

with 10 acres $260,000. 
will sell six corner acres $100,000. 

90 plus acre farm with beautiful Early 
American (1 738) Colonial frame house in ex- 
cellent condition, with lovely old trees Barn, 
outbuildings and filtered pool. Tenant farmer 
would like to continue $500,000. 



-<- 



.C 



REAL ESTATE 

Anne S Stockton, Broker 



READY TO GO 

If you have the perfect house plans we have the 
perfect lot to build on A six-acre heavily-wooded 
lot on the south slope of the Sourland Mountains 
What a view! The perc test has been approved 
Come see it, now. $30,000 

DEVELOPERS-INVESTORS 

49 acres in the most exclusive section of Mon- 
tgomery Township. Next to the Bedens Brook 
Country Club. An area of $150,000 plus homes 
Ask us about available utilities. Very good terms to 
qualified buyer. 

Other building lots and acreages available 



Callus- 466-2444 

MAY AGENCY « 

Realtor - Insuror ESS 

Smrtwrt..**, Princaonn. MIS 
Rt. 518,Blawenburg 



LT3 



Barbara P. Broad, Lorraine E Garland, Ann T. Rose 



Carnegie 

Princeton. N.J.^^ 



REALTY, Inc. 
130 Nassau St. 



CUSTOM BUILT BRICK CONTEMPORARY 
RANCH a mature treed lot on a quiet cul-de-sac. 
$89,000 



Arable-Everett Realty 

Pnnceton-Hightstown Road 
P O Box 21 . Princeton Jet , N J 08550 



THE 



CHARLES E. ANABIE, Realtor 
ALLENTOWN, N.J. Very pretty Duplex on South 
Main Street. Very good condition. First floor apart- 
ment has living room, dining room, kitchen, 
bedroom and bath. Second floor apartment has 
living room, kitchen, two bedrooms and bath. The 
zoning is commercial for this property has a num- 
ber of possibilities. Call lor details on income and 
expenses Asking $42,500 

HOPEWELL TWP. Big, new, Georgian Colonial in 
Elm Ridge Park-West. 3.600 ft. of living space 
Master bedroom suite plus 4 other large 
bedrooms. Fireplace in the living room and family 
room Closets and storage space galore. Large 
oversize 2 car garage. Designed for the family that 
wants comfort and amenities. Minor changes can 
still be made in interior design. Early Spring oc 
cupancy. $144,900 

WEST WINDSOR TWP. Existing operating Lun 
cheonette including equipment, furniture and fix 
lures and Real Estate Building also contains ap- 
prox. 450 sq. ft. of store space next to the Lun 
cheonette. The 2nd floor contains a very nice 1 
bedroom apartment. Ideal for an owner operator 

$80,000 

WEST WINDSOR TOWNSHIP 2 parcels - 
RESEARCH OFFICE ZONED. No. 1 - 5 plus acres 
with small building, $108,000 

The other. 6 plus acres, no building $85,000 

OFFICE SPACE - PRINCETON JUNCTION - 
HIGHTSTOWN RD. Up to 1875 square feet 
available Please call Chas. E Anable for details. 



a 



ade 



AGENCY | 
REAL ESTATE 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 

Colonial Cape Cod on a large corner lot adjacent 
to beautiful wooded areas This custom home of- 
fers many special leatures including center hall 
entry with slate foyer, large living room, formal 
dining room, tamily room with fireplace, screened 
porch off the breakfast area, unique indoor- 
outdoor kennel run, oversized double garage, full 
basement with panelled office, central air con- 
ditioning, excellent closet space, two full baths, 
and four very large bedrooms. A very special 
home offered at $75,900 






m 



Member Princeton Group ana 
Mercer County Board ol Realtors 

(609) 799-1661 Anytime 



737-1330 



The Pennington Professional Center 

65 South Main Street Pennington. N.J. 08534 

Member Multiple Listing Service 




PENNINGTON BOROUGH 

i charm Family room 
l car garage, large lot 

$63,900 

OLDER HOUSE YOU SAY how about this Colonial on a corner 
lot. Living room with fireplace, modern kitchen, laundry room, 
lile bath, 3 bedrooms and 1 small study or sewing room 
for future expansion. 2 car garage $59,500 

HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 

SMALL HORSE FARM three acres, 2 story Gambrel, family r 
with fireplace, 4 bedrooms, 2Vi baths, 2 car garage $79,900 

SEVENTY FIVE ACRE FARM Attractive old colonial 
1710. 2 liieplaces. 4 bedrooms. 2 lull baths, barn, silo and 
other out buildings Privacy $270,000 

ATTRACTIVE RANCHER tamily room. 3 bedrooms, 1 V, baths, 
2 car garage, central air Large lot $55,900 

WOODED SETTING rancher, tamily room with fireplace, 3 
bedrooms. 1 'A baths. 2 car garage $57,000 

JUST FOR YOU well designed rancher with central air, tamily 
room. 3 bedrooms, laundry room. 1 M baths. 2 car garage 

ALUMINUM SIDING RANCHER New kitchen, family room with 
fireplace. 3 bedrooms, tile bath, central air, 2 car garage 

WEST AMWELL TOWNSHIP 

FOR THE ASTUTE INVESTOR old colonial with live apart- 
ments Also stone cottage and outbuildings plus 2VS acres 

$125,000 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP 

VILLAGE COLONIAL on quiet street, lireplace family room, 2 
lull baths, 4 bedrooms, 2 car garage $65,500 

TO BE BUILT Spanish style two story on 65 acres Two 
(.replaces. 4 bedrooms, 3V4 baths. 2 car garage, blueprints 
available $151,500 

EWING TOWNSHIP 

CONTEMPORARY 2 family rooms, fireplace, 5 bedrooms, 5 
baths, central air. m-qround pool Many extras Privacy 

$164,500 



I 37 acres, Hopewell Twp 



77 acres, half wooded with ! 
cellent road Irontage 



,, Hopewell Township 



Hopewell Township t 
$3,000 per ac 



to acres. Hopewell Township residential $45,000 



Van Hise Realty 



Realtors 



^^ _ Keauor: 

wtflTF 



Pennington, N.J 
tel. (609) 7J7-5615 
(609) 88S-2U0 




idscoping. design, mo1 
and lifestyle, Hidden Lake is the most luxurious of all 
ey's apartments 6 different Hoorplons to 

from $295 mo. 

Hidden 
Lake 

Town & Country 
Apartments 



i Route 1 north 
to Cozzens Lane. No 
Brunswick (sign says 
"Adams Station") left on 
Cozzens Lane to Route 
27; left on Route 27 to 
Hidden Lake Drive, left 
to model apartments 



Phone: (201) 82 I 8088 or Moin Off i< 
(201) 846-5700 




You'll like our moving service 
for what you DON'T get. Like... 




Mildew. 



Mold.. 



Insects... Bad Odors. 



Protecting your things from nicks, dents and scratches is only 
part of our job- We think it's just as important that we keep your 
belongings spotlessly Iresh and clean So -we treat our vans 
and the pdds we use with the famous SANITIZED" process A 
unique precaution that assures the freshness ol everything you 
own For a really "clean get-away" on movmg day, call us 



BOHREN'S 



Moving and Storage 

Princeton. New Jersey 
ii. a v.n un.m (609) 452-2200 

MOVING WITH CARE EVERYWHERE 



Systems Operations. Inc. 

Subsidiary ot Msttiematica. Inc. 
14 Washington Road 
Princeton, New Jersey 

Equal Opportunity Employer M/F 

SECRETARIES 

We are seeking qualified 
secretaries and typists lor 
several areas of the Univer- 
sity Positions available in 
both administrative and 
academic environment Ex- 
cellent typing a must. 

Our benefits include one 
month vacation, full medical 
and life insurance coverage. 
educational reimbursement, 
and much more. 
APPLY: 
PERSONNEL OFFICE 

Princeton 
University 

Princeton, New Jersey 

Or Call: 609-452-3276, tor 
application. Princeton 
University is an Equal Op- 
portunity/ Affirmative ac- 
tion Employer M/F 



manager of our growing cor- 
poration needs a secretary 
with good typing and 
stenography skills, and 2-4 
years solid secretarial ex- 
perience Duties include 
correspondence. record 
keeping and computing 
statistics Figure aptitude 
essential. 



We 



offer educatic 



hospitalization, Life Insurance 
and major medical, regular 
salary reviews, retirement 
program 



PRINCETON APPLED 
RESEARCH CORP. 



ENERGETIC PERSON 

with office management background. Op- 
portunity to invest in and manage new 
secretarial and business services firm. 
Location on Route 1 near Quakerbridge 
Road. 

Call 452-9586 



Car Sales Person 

Full or Part Time 

...needed for local progressive 
dealership. Experience preferred 
but will consider others. Salary plus 
commission. Call Mr. Lavis at 924- 
3750 for appointment. 

Nini Chrysler-Plymouth 

809 State Road (Rt. 206) Princeton, N.J. 



FULL-TIME SALES POSITION 

WITH A DIFFERENCE... to work with a select team of women who specialize 
in service and fashion awareness. Would you like to develop your talents in 
our specialty store atmosphere? An opportunity awaits a creative person. 

Good salary, no night hours, 37'/2 hour week, liberal employee benefits. Ex- 
perience helpful. 

Call Mrs. Paulus at 609-924-3221 for interview. 



w 




womens ' and ckildrens ' apparel ' 
210 nasaau street • princeton, new jersey 



Thompson Land 



195 Nassau Sireel 
Princeton. N.J 
'609' 921-7655 



REDDING'S 

Plumbing 

Heating 

Roofing 

Air Conditioning 

GE Appliances 

234 Nassau Street 

924-0166 



COME CLOSER 

and inspect this gem of Early Americana. Well 
maintained authentic 100 plus year old Colonial 
with 4 bedrooms and 1 bath. Also, on the grounds 
sits a well constructed two story building complete 
with its own hot water and electrical system Con- 
crete floor workshop (32x22) and powder room on 
first floor. Entire second floor studio is a gorgeous 
spacious room with a high vaulted ceiling. Ex- 
cellent building for professional use There is also 
a two-story wooden barn Grounds are well treed 
and shrubbed. Hopewell Boro location permits 
professional offices in conjunction with a residen- 
ce $110,000 

NEW LISTING - On a 1 .8 acre country lot within 4 
miles of Pennington and Hopewell Boros sits this 6 
year old 2 story 8 room house. Offered at $82,000, 
Hopewell Township 
COUNTRY CHARM 

10 minutes to railroad. 20 minutes to Princeton 
University from this 4 bedroom bi-level. Modern 
kitchen with indirect lighting. 2 car garage. Family 
room, with brick fireplace. On almost 1 Vi wooded 
acres. $59,500 

MID 19TH CENTURY 

New England Center-Hall Colonial. Spacious 8 
room house with 2'/2 baths. 2 fireplaces, large 
modern kitchen. 2 car detached garage Located 
across from Hopewell Country Club $71 ,900 

WOULD YOU BELIEVE! 

3 bedrooms, 1 Vz baths, garage, basement, dining 
room, living room all on a Hopewell Boro quiet 
tree-lined street for $46,000? Call us, we'll show 
you. 

PRINCETON FARMS 

Clean-Pleasure to Show. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, 
100' x 250' lot. Large country kitchen. Formal 
dining room. Slate entry foyer. Natural stained 
woodwork Hopewell Township. $64,000 

SUPER COLONIAL 

Brick and cedar siding for low maintenance cost. 
Spacious kitchen with breakfast bar. Full 
basement. 4 bedrooms, 30' x 24' raised wood 
deck. Many mature trees and privacy $52,500 

PRESTIGE CAN BE YOURS! 

Three country wooded acres within 5 minutes of 
shopping and public transportation. New con- 
struction Offers 8 rooms, 2Vz baths, fireplace, 
sundeck, central air, full basement, 2-car garage. 
$79,900 

HOPEWELL VALLEY BUSINESS PROPERTIES 

HOPEWELL BORO Newly listed 2 story building 

on Broad St. Offers 2 retail stores and 1 very large 

apartment Extra two rooms and bath. Offered at 

$69,500 

HOPEWELL BORO 5,000 sq. ft. 2-story building 
previously used as research laboratory, manufac- 
ture of scientific instruments and for jewelry 
manufacture. Zoned industrial. Can be used for 
antique, art, craft and gift shops. $79,900 

PENNINGTON BORO Be your own boss Invest in 
this family owned and operated Western Auto 
store. Located on busy Rt. 31 Turn key operation 
for $15,000 plus inventory. 

STONY BROOK REALTY 

35 W. Broad Street, Hopewell 
Realtors 466-0900 

Member Multiple Listing Service 



466-2811 
466-3142 



466-1630 
S63-739S 



.w"jm'oJ'v 


™!T 


Sin 


."S^Im"' 


a ZTJ% r '. 


U , EC . 


"'1 


IW WOO or 


%X H 85UES?riJiKS2B! 


",ss"; 


5S 


zs 


I «9S per 


'SIl«!5,VSJI 


" T c 


:'?: 


rjssS 



JOHN ROOT. Inc. 

Realtors 
LuminrvaV Pa. 1B933 
215-297-8171 



STOP IN OUR OFFICE AND SEE OUR 
"VALU-VISION SHOW OF HOMES" 

IN BEAUTIFUL COLOR 
ALLENTOWN 4 BEDROOM COLONIAL 

Beautiful brick and frame home with 2'/z baths, 
panelled family room, modern kitchen, over- 
sized 2 car garage 3 years old. $47,400 

RADIANT SPLIT most attractive 3 bedroom tri- 
level split with 2 lull baths. 2 lovely fireplaces 
(one in living room, one in family room), 
workshop or den, rear screened porch. Well 
landscaped Vt acre lot $59,900 

FOUR BEDROOM SPLIT plenty of living space, 
modern eat-in kitchen, family room, new bath, 
enclosed rear porch. Set on a corner lot in Cop- 
perfield Estates. $41 ,500 

WEIDEL REAL ESTATE INC. 

REALTORS 

"Our 61st Year" 
Hamilton Oftice 

2663 Nottingham Way, Mercerville, 'N.J. 

586-1400 



WEIDEL REAL ESTATE INC 



Realtors 

OUR 60th YEAR OF PROFESSIONAL SERVICE 
evenings 448-7698 



k 






ilj 



■,»' !T 



:m 



TENDER LOVING CARE 

The present owners have obviously given this home tender loving care! Four bedrooms. 2 h 
baths. 20' living room with raised hearth fireplace and built-in bookshelf wall. Not anticipating 
transfer, the planned plantings in the yard provide blossoms and toilage Spring, Summer and 
Fall, plus shade trees and a brick patio. Offered in the MID-FIFTIES 

CAN YOU BELIEVE 

A 3 bedroom home on a V, acre corner lot, on a quiet street in a charming small town' Modern 
eat-in kitchen, large living room, gas heat and appliances. Move-in condition. Seeing is 

. „ . THIRTIES 

believing 

COMMERCIAL RENTAL 

Prime Nassau Street location-approx. 900 s/f. One to Five year leases... 

PRIME LOCATION-SUPER AMENITIES 

Not to mention the easy maintenance, express Bus service to NYC. Three king size bedrooms, 
balconied dining room overlooking large living room with 1 3' ceiling and ultra modern sunny kit- 

FORTIES 

Chen. 

LANDINTHEAMWELLS! 

Come drive with us and we'll show you these gorgeous pieces of land-would you believe 1 1 
acres priced in the LOW-THIRTIES and 3 acres priced in the TEENS 

ONLY ABOUT 15 MINUTES FROM PRINCETON 

This Brand New 4 bedroom, 2V4 bath Colonial is situated on approx. one acre In M ° n '9omery 
Township. There's still time to make a selection of electrical fixtures and kitchen "oonng^^ 



THE PRINCETON OFFICE 



242V2 Nassau Street 



921-2700 




BEAUTIFUL LISTINGS! 




■ "J*j 



Deep country living on the boundary of Princeton Township! 

A superb one floor contemporary house set on 7 acres of field, native trees, 
cedars and forest of dogwood An appropriate setting for a house carefully plan- 
ned and expanded from the original built in 1948 - by two wings added in 1960 
and 1964. The Center boasts a huge living room with 15 ft. ceiling, fireplace and 
bookshelves - insulated glass window wall, former kitchen now a wet bar and 
study. There are 2 double bedrooms and large tile bath. One new wing is now the 
Dining Room with sliding glass doors, a huge Gourmet kitchen with the best ap- 
pliances - most recent wing is by a Garden Room and exiting on to a redwood 
deck, terraces and lovely pool surrounded by perennial garden beds. There is a 
charming court entrance yard - the house has exceptional storage facilities, 
throughout - must be seen to be appreciated. 



YES THERE IS A BUILDING LOT IN PRINCETON TOWNSHIP WITH A 
SEWER PERMIT OVER AN ACRE AND A HALF NEAR THE HERRON- 
TOWN WOODS READY FOR YOUR OWN BUILDING PLAN. $38,000. 




THE BAKER HOUSE IN BELLE MEAD 
Here's a century old farmhouse with every modern convenience and a newer 
wing with all the luxuries It boasts six bedrooms, a 34' living room, library with 
many built-ins, magnificent family room with bar, five fireplaces, 24' dining 
room, beautiful grounds with a swimming pool and mature plantings. The list 
goes on and on. This is truly a very special home for special people. It is our 
newest listing and just eight miles from Princeton $150,000 



PLEASE NOTE: WE HAVE JUST LISTED ONE OF PRINCETON'S MOST 
OUTSTANDING STONE COLONIALS THE PRICE IS $230,000 AND EXTRA 
LAND IS AVAILABLE WE WOULD BE DELIGHTED TO HEAR FROM YOU 
FOR FURTHER DETAILS BEFORE OUR COMPLETE AD RUNS NEXT 
WEEK 




IMMACULATE, established and better than brand new this spacious West Win- 
dsor colonial has been cared for by its VERY particular owners to make sure 
everything is A number I (the original dishwasher for instance is still brand 
new and unused). A 14 x 26 Living Room, 16 x 18 family room, 11-4 x 18 master 
bedroom (with its own bath, of course) and lots of other special features and 
space in this 4 bedroom, 2'v bath home Definately a BEST BUY. Offered at 

$69,900 




THE BEST COLONIAL BUY. seven year old two-story on a quiet horseshoe 
road in marvelous Montgomery! Four bedrooms, 2V, baths, family room with 
fireplace, separate dining room with beautiful paper, and a huge picture win- 
dow in the comfortable living room ! Full basement, two-car garage and more. 



IDEAL GARAGE APARTMENT ON NEARBY ESTATE . 3 bdrms, living room, 
full bath, eat-in kitchen Pool privileges. $350-month. 



FURNISHED THREE BEDROOM NEAR UNIVERSITY Two full baths, living 
room-fireplace and screened porch Full basement . Kitchen and dining room 

$500-month 




NEAT, TIDY NEW ENGLAND STYLE LINES ON THIS WEST WINDSOR 
COLONIAL. Walk to the train, walk to shopping, minutes from schools and "in 
home" business possibilities. A very interesting choice. Offered at $66,500 




OUTSTANDING VALUE IN NEARBY MONTGOMERY ...just a tee shot away 
from Pike Brook Country Club is our lovely listing on an acre with a barn and 
kennel. Spacious colonial two-level with mature plantings and professional lan- 
dscaping Four bedrooms, three full baths, front and back stairs, living room, 
dining room and much, much more, including a spacious family room We can 
show this property any time so please call for an appointment with us ! $63,500 




HERE'S A HOUSE WITH PRIVACY, PEACE AND A SUNSET VIEW. Two- 
story colonial on 2.38 acres; three bedrooms and hardly lived in, only two years 
old. Large living room, dining room, beautiful family room facing the sunset 
with fireplace and glass sliding doors. Full basement, Master bedroom with 
full bath. Custom built with elaborate, expensive wiring equipment; antenna 
system, outlets in most rooms, amplifiers and much, much more. Professional 
sodding, beautifully treed with fruit trees, wild flowers, etc. $68,900 



Hopewell 

Hopewell House Square 
Hopewell, New Jersey 08525 
(609) 466-2550 



JOHNT 



^HENDERSON 

D C A I TADC ^^-» 



REALTORS 

Phone at any time 



Princeton 

353 Nassau Street 

Princeton. New Jersey 08540 

(609)921-2776 



HENDERSON, OF COURSE! 




ANOTHER NEW LISTING • AND A GEM IT IS Well-located 4 bedrooms, 2Mi 
baths. Near Montgomery Shopping Plaza and Princeton Research Park. This 
exceptional home has an oversize family room, eat-in kitchen and overlooks an 
acre of beautiful grounds. Central air conditioning. Excellent value. $85,000 




SOUTHERN CHARM IN LAWRENCEVILLE! Lovely brick and frame house 
with beautiful foyer, living room, dining room, kitchen, study, family room with 
fireplace and powder room completes the first floor. A circular stair leads to 
four bedrooms and two baths on the second floor. Some of the added features : a 
screened porch, mahogany sun deck together with professional landscaping 
and an attached garage. (72,900. 



BUY OF THE YEAR! 
On Cleveland Lane just off Raymond Road in South Brunswick (with its super 
schools): a modified colonial priced at a most realistic number in a most 
desirable neighborhood! It has a large living room, formal dining room, den 
with fireplace, eat-in kitchen, laundry room, four bedrooms, three full baths, 
full basement, two-car garage and central air conditioning. ONLY $66,900 
UNBELIEVABLE, BUT TRUE! 



AN EXTRAORDINARY SITUATION ON PROVINCE LINE ROAD, AND 
AREA OF EXQUISITE SCENERY AND QUIETLY ELEGANT ESTATES, 
built 20 years before its time ... exceptional construction, durable and divine 
wood beams and panelling throughout ... a free flow of rooms on both levels, two 
fantastic brick fireplaces, full windows and doors and a redwood deck off the 
upper entertainment area. Evergreens, dogwoods, and natural plantings are 
seen from every comfortable inside area. Resting on 8 secluded acres. 

$175,000 




A HOUSE IN THE WOODS. ..Located in the desirable Riverside area of Prin- 
ceton Township, on a superb, wooded lot ; offering all the conveniences of a 
location close to the schools, shopping, the NY. bus, and yet the privacy one 
needs in which to relax. Living room, powder room, screened porch, master 
bedroom with bath, three other bedrooms - larger than usual - with hall bath, 
basement, patio surrounding a fenced in pool for leisure enjoyment and a two- 
car garage. Call us today to see it Reduced to $89,000 




NEAT, TIDY NEW ENGLAND STYLE LINES ON THIS WEST WINDSOR 
COLONIAL. Walk to the train, walk to shopping, minutes from schools and "in 
home" business possibilities. A very interesting choice; in choice condition. 

Offered at $66,500 




wu ... just a chip shot away 
a spectacular contemporary by William Thompsonn 



ROLLING HILL ROAD at the BEDENS BROOK CLUB 
from the 17th fairway ... a spectacular contemporary b. ..„ 
AIA, recently featured in a national magazine, for its extraordinary use of 
beams windows and space Vaulted ceiling in the living room over the fireplace 
and full wall of windows to bring the outside in! Heavenly plan for a small 
family with master wing off by itself! Every imaginable modern convenience is 
just a short step from the foyer with balcony Please call for an appointment to 
see this masterful design. j^t $149 ^ 





DIVINE DESIGN AND DECOR.. A fireplace with handcarved mantle 
highlights the ample living room with windows at front and back; adjacent to 
the inviting dining room a lovely panelled library has bookshelves, stereo 
wiring. A family kitchen of Quaker Maid design with functional shelves, lazy 
susans and all the other worksavers is off the porch, utility room and not too far 
from the two-car garage for grocery toting. There's a master suite with full 
bath ; a second large bedroom has its own full bath, and then there are two other 
comfortable bedrooms and a full bath. The basement featu res a workshop, 
panelled playroom, wine cellar, storage closet AND SAUNA WITH SHOWER! 
COME SEE FOR YOURSELF! 




iODVTEW HOUSE" 



This marvelous, "giant" contains five bedrooms and all the extras you could 
ask for. A gigantic family room with many built-ins and a super brick fireplace 
Extra large living room with formal fireplace A dining room with chair rail 
and ceiling molding. A panelled library with built-in bookshelves 3 full baths, 2 
powder rooms and a full wet bar Central vacuum system, concealed phone and 
TV wires An enormous eat-in kitchen Brick patio. Trulv a superior home 

$142,000 



Hopewell 

Hopewell House Square 
Hopewell, New Jersey 08525 
(6091 466-2550 



JOHNT 



CHENDERgON 



Princeton 
353 Nassau Street 
W< Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

(609) 921-2776 



REALTORS 

Phone at any time 



FULLER BRUSHES 

BEN D MARUCA 

175 Redwood Avenue 

Td. 888-1254 

Trenton. N.J. 0X610 




Mary Watts 
Store 

Groceries Gasoline 

irepiace Wood. Kmdimc 

Charcoal Briquets 

Open every day 

and evening 

Route 206, State Road 




«0O0r> 


BEET 


a rs! 


jSf 




sss 


PAINT 


»c. 


mm, 


», 


n 


<«, 


"*MtiO 


""n't. 


'SV7, 


r;° 


'" 


»• 


s 


'!:" 


IS 


E 


i 


■1 


itavim 


»p«p 


rrfcrn. 


Wd 


•i 


HIT, 


jfe? 


-' 


sss 


t ,.,„. f 


£ 



1)"** ral 


E S T» L °L T .» A oT s *'""" 


™"™J 


,-. t S?KSCi^'SS 



WE'LL FIX YOUR 
FAVORITE ^'4 
PIPE A>7^S 




SCHUSTER'S 

Appraisers* Auctioneers 

20 NASSAU ST. 

609-924-3228 
Princeton, N.J. 







iaa./bie ceauruwte I 

HOUGHTON i 

Real Estate ill 



1 's^iSas&sSfSas" 


• "p'ssat "Im™j o » jests 


' F £; 5 H;.:Sr£.i'rE 


S!U' iS!f.b 


r3rS? 


Kjk" .'JeTo'J'mlJrm.'nS' c.l'l Sff 


*4e y 8i cf 2sit 


WM 


>bie rates V Caii8fl3 V |7j7 




ling April H $0-300 per 






85sSs 


P mp. SC . H mim" 


1973 914-4, 5- speed. 33 
dip. ashing IJW0 446 



ff£lng»; , gMM. L P *" T " r ' """ 



GsaoBCxa3cai» r s w a^«»to 



PRINCETON 
ARMS 

Luxury Apartments 



Reirtgeralof • Venetian Blinds 
Large walk in closet • Rooms 

Wall lo wall carpeting in 2nd 
floor apartments • Superin- 
tendent on site • Rents start at 
$190 and up 

Private entrances • Laundry 
Model Apartment — 

Telephone (609) 448-4801 
(Open Daily from 1 2 30 p m to 
5pm except Sunday) Diri 

Hightstown Rd , Tur 

old Trenton Rd v* mile, Tur 

left and follow signs 



]< CEDAR SHAKE COLONIAL 

Large foyer and 23 foot living room. Eat-in kit- 
chen, family room hug fireplace and redwood 
deck, 4 bedrooms, 2 X A baths. Central air con- 
ditioning, full basement. Montgomery Township. 
Owners anxious to sell. 872,500 

CHERRY BROOK DRIVE cul-de-sac location, 
close to Princeton in Montgomery Township. A 
spacious 4 bedroom Colonial, brand new with 
study and family room. S85.000 

CRANBIRY DUPLEX 1 large and 1 small 
apartment. 845,000 

WEST WINDSOR 3 BR house. JS350 H/HW 

Winifred Brickley 

Licensed Real Estate Bioh 

assau Street. Rm. 

924 7474 





SPEAKING OF NEW HOUSES 



Princeton 

A brand new house will soon be blooming with the 
dogwoods on 1V4 acres. Conveniently and at- 
tractively planned Colonial with 4 bedrooms. Ex- 
terior is ot cedar siding. You can still personalize 
this beauty. Certainly worthy of your con- 
sideration! $138,500 

And West Windsor 

New bi-level with maintenance free aluminum 
siding, finished two car garage. Four bedroom i 
home with panelled family room with fireplace. 

$63,500 I 



U| Commuter? 

B Interested in late spring occupancy? Gracious III 

new 2 story colonial with 4 bedrooms. 2Vi baths, III 

panelled family room with fireplace plus main- UJ 

tenance free aluminum siding. $72,500 G 

Or if you plan to build your own LI 

The last remaining lot. nearly 1V4 acres and of 5 

course wooded with a view of Honey Lake in Prin- III 

ceton's most exclusive suburb - Elm Ridge Park. Ill 

Builder-owner would consider building a custom III 

for you at approximately $135,000 III 

Or a half acre lot also in Hopewell Township with ~ 

sewer at $22,000 EE 



JOHN H. HOUGHTON, Broker 



MLS 



Barbara Ellis 
Woody Sklllman I 
Bill Flaherty 



Free Parking - Palmer Square Park & Shop lot I 
Member Multiple Listing Service 

ni mi mi 



HILTON 



EXCELLENT THREE BEDROOM CAPE COD 

situated on a one acre treed lot. Interior recently 
completely remodeled. $41 ,000 

BEGINNERS LUCK! - that's what you'll have with 
this two bedroom Ranch type Duplex. $45,500 

EXCELLENT LOCATION FOR THE NEW YORK 
COMMUTER. One year old three bedroom Ranch, 
central air. fireplace and a full basement. $55,500 

THIS NEW FOUR BEDROOM HOME has ample 
space for comfortable living. Maintenance free 
aluminum siding. $63,500 

ATTRACTIVE FOUR BEDROOM COLONIAL, 

panelled family room with fireplace, full basement 
and attached two-car garage. $67,500 

THE LAST NEW HOME IN AN EXCLUSIVE AREA 
OF WEST WINDSOR TOWNSHIP. Two-story 
Colonial with four bedrooms located on a cul-de- 
sac $71,500 



SPLIT LEVEL with four bedrooms, fireplace and a 
20 x 20 family room. $71 ,900 



REALTY CO. of Princeton, Inc. 
REALTORS 



RENTALS: 

FOUR BEDROOM COLONIAL available im- 
mediately for one or two years. Fine conditio~s. 
$500 per month plus utilities. 



FURNISHED THREE BEDROOM RANCH in Prin- 
ceton Township available immediately. 

$500 per month plus utilities. 



COMMERCIAL: 

COMMERCIAL ZONED BUILDING suited for trac- 
tor trailers, truck storage or warehousing. 3,000 
square feet block and stucco building located in 
Jamesburg on four acres of land. For sale or rent. 
$85,000 

OFFICE OR LIGHT INDUSTRIAL. Ample parking. 
Excellent location in Hamilton Township on 
Whitehead Road. 3.000 square feet 



INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES: 

V> acre lot in Princeton Township 



THREE YEAR OLD HOME in Princeton Township DUPLEXES, APARTMENTS AND OFFICE 

Four bedrooms, 2V4 baths, central air and at- BUILDIN GS for the small or large investor. Starting 
tached two-car garage. $78,000 at $45,500 



ca 



Harvey Rude. 201 359-5327 Jack Stryker. 921-6752 I 1^ 194 Nassau Street 921-6060 

William Schuessler. 921-8963 Allen D'Arcy. 799-0685 LU 1" the Hilton Building • 2nd floor 

Member or touwpie Liming Service ' Elevator Service 



HOME DECOR 

Curtains, Draperies 
Bedspreads, Lamp Shades 
Princeton Shopping Center 

921-7296 



"The Ten Crucial Days," Printmakers' Evaluation of Period 
Leading to Battle of Princeton, Is Mow on Exhibition Here 



Valentine Cards and Gifts... 
THE PRINCETON GIFT SHOP [f 

13 Palmer Sq.W. 924-0813 i 





No Minimums No Gimmicks 
Cash and Carry 

press 

14 Washington Road 

Princeton Junction 

799-2800 



BANK RECEIVES "THANK YOU 



. . Princeton Bank and Trust has provided llnan- 
cial support lor the Ten Crucial Days" print portfolio and Its predecessor, "Prin- 
ceton 1 776-1976 . At Saturday's ceremonies In which the prints were formally 
unveiled In Nassau Hall, William Selden ol the Princeton Community Bicentennial 
Comm ssion (second from left) presented a "Certificate of Appreciation" to the 
bank. Left Is Barnwell Straut, president of the bank and at the far right, James 
Stewart III, bank president-elect. Former Governor Robert Meyner, second from 
right, represented the State Bicentennial Commission (Marie Bellls photo) 



A cold, bitter January 199 Princeton had a preview of 
years ago is recalled this week 'he prints for a brief moment chosen for the attack by 
by the 15 prints displayed, for Saturday when they hung for reasons of the Hessian's well- 
outside viewing, in the win- 'he day in Nassau Hall itself known leaning toward 
dows of Princeton Bank and reminding those old stones of unrestrained Yuletide 
Trust at Nassau and Palmer what they'd seen 199 years celebrations Heavy drinking 



Square 



DRAPERIES 

SLIPCOVERS 

UPHOLSTERING 

WALLPAPER 

BATH ACCESSORIES 



466-2640 



INTERIOR 
DECORATING 

Professional 
Assistance 

THE TOMATO FACTORY 

Hamilton Avenue, Hopewell N J 

Monday thru Friday 9-4 30 

Saturday 10-5 



before, in the aftermath of the * nd a momentary lapse of 
Battle of Princeton on discipline were counted on .. ." 
January 2, 1777 relates the Trenton historical 

Society's "A History of 

The prints have been Trenton." 
assembled lovingly in a , Hcre ™ Portfolio begins, 
splendid portfolio, "The Ten Margaret Kennard Johnson, 
Crucial Days," and after their in ? sombre forest green 
exhibition at the bank, they calendar uses numbers and 
will be available to schools or a kind ot tral1 to symbolize the 
institutions who would like to march of men and events, 
display them for pride in Renee Levine has followed the 
history, educational purposes s ' or V ° f Washington's spy, 
or simply to show that the / onn Honeywell, - 



Bicentennial can be marked l?""'^ ,j n >! er " Es P 
with imagination, dignity and SJJJ"; .h S i ,e „i > .^f n ^ P 2r. 
; of fitness 



traits of the patriot and his 



■cap? 



r <zr 



PHOTOGRAPHY 

JOHN SIMPSON 

924-8497 By Appointment 




Zelda Laschever gathered Wlfe ' , bo 'J °L w . nom * ere 
together the 15 Princeton wrongly thought to be Tory 
Printmakers who have sympathizers and who suf- 
executed the prints in the fered silent abuse in order to 
volume. The same artists, a provide cover for HoneyweU s 
year ago, showed the first invaluable work. 

portfolio in their two-part _ -_. , . ... 

Bicentennial series. Jf« m p "i"« s W ord » Lmda 

Prints from this portfolio, Wn ' te -„ ln . h f P nnt : Presents 
called "1776-1976, a Portfolio: Tom F ame .l ™° ,n 8 J™ 8 . 
Princeton, New Jersey," are "These are the times hat try 
now on display at Prudential men s ^"J 8 sa ' d t0 bav * 
Life in Newark, the Newark bee" w " tte , n ° n a , drumh f ad 
Library, the State Museum in ^ySl™S 
Trenton, the New Jersey Ann Woolfolk depicts ai simple 
Bicentennial Commission in S?™f r on a »}}'* ground- 
Trenton, the Rockefeller Victory or Death 
Medical School in New York 
City, the American Embassy 
in Japan, at Princeton 

., - . __„:!..,_ c: , nanus ui idu; uuitiin. nig ijiuu 

"■ ,!1 « JkI™ 'i?,„ and Unicorn a e ainst "« to - 

Ltbrary at Mathematica with the balancltipping onthe 
Systemedics and in several Ea g le - S side. The embclsment 
private coll ections . of ^ a , ^ to p svmbolizes 

. „ , .. _, „. the "Victory" password, 

A Sense of the Time. The worms at the bottom syro- 
new portfolio is not a Mile the dead 

panorama of battle scenes, 

nor does it attempt to tell just Yvonne Burk depicts the 
what happened on each of the Declaration of Independence 



TOTO'S MARKET 

74 Witherspoon St. 924-0768 

PRIME BEEF 
ALL MEAT CUT TO ORDER!! 

Fresh Lamb - Veal - Pork 

Perdue Poultry 

Smoked Hams - Slab Bacon 

Canned Hams - Thuman's Cold Cuts 

Fresh Fruits & Vegetables 

Fresh Mrs. Smith's Pies 

FREE DELIVERY 

The Finest in Food for your Table!! 

ALL MEAT ORDERS MUST BE 

PLACED AT LEAST 3 HOURS IN ADVANCE 

HOURS. Mon & Tues - BOO AM-5.30PM 

Thurs & Fri.-8:00 AM-6:30 PM 

Wed & Sat.-8:00 AM-1 .00 PM 

EST. 1912 




PRINTING 

CALCULATOR 

Adds, subtracts, multiplies, divides, 
grand total, credit balance. 
percent calculation 



Reg $199 50 



169.50 



Lonni Sue Johnson's 
Eagles Weight'' has the 
hands of fate balancing Lion 



SMITH CORONA • OLYMPIA • ADLER • IBM 

Typewriters — New • Reconditioned • 

Trade-ins • Rentals • Repairs 
TYPEWRITER - Ribbons • Cartridges • Pads • 

Covers • Tables • Chairs 
PANASONIC - Color and B/W Television Sets 

• Cassette Tape Recorders • 8 Track Players • 

Radios • Digital Clock Radios • Electric Pencil 

Sharpeners 
AMPEX - Recording Cassettes 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS, and other brands - 

Pocket Calculators • Printing Calculators • 

Adding Machines 
SANYO — Phone Answering Recorders • 

Dictating and Transcribing Units 
LAMPS — Clamp on Desk and Table Models 
3M — Copiers • Copy Paper 
DURACELL - Long Lasting Batteries 
VOLTAGE CONVERTERS - For Foreign Travel 



CBM 9242243 

CENTER BUSINESS MACHINES 



applied to it the imagination 
and skill of a creative artist to 
evoke for the viewer, a sense 
of the time. 

The Ten Crucial Days were 
those from December 25, 1776 
to January 3, 1977. Some two 
weeks before, the Americans 
under Washington had crossed 
the Delaware into Penn- 
sylvania. The British under 
Cornwallis were in Trenton 
and would have pursued the 
Americans into Pennsylvania 
except that no boats were 
available. 

Establishing cantonments 
at Elizabeth town, Brunswick, 
Princeton, Trenton and 
Bordentown- the last two 
were Hessian outposts- 
Cornwallis halted operations 
for the winter and began to 
settle in. 

The week before Christmas, 
the Americans under 
Washington talked about 
moving on the Hessian out- 
posts and on Christmas Eve, 
made detailed plans for 
crossing back over the 
Delaware and attacking 
Trenton. 



104 ro.iss.iu Street 



SALE 



VINYL ASBESTOS 12"xl2" 

VII E "**• * 10 - 80 

ILK Per Carton 



f95 

Per Carton 



ARMSTRONG 
IMBOfSID 

UNOUUM 

*A*9 



CONCOUUM 
CUf IRON FLOR 

**9S 



HIAVY DUTY 

CHAR PIAJTIC 
CARPET RUNNIRS 

ft* QQC 

S1.10FI ' 



89' 



KORVETTE SHOPPING CENTER 
MHUCfTON t OLDfJ HIS.. TOUT M 

Phone 392-2300 



Discount Center, 



Mon.-Thuri.-Fn. 

« A.M. to« P.M. 

Tim ., WW M, Sat ! 



(ioor fashion a 
S 

a~3 



CANDLELIGHT CABARET 

A Benefit at the Unitarian Church 
Sip wine ... hear songs by the Footnotes 
Watch the world famous Triangle Revue. 



8:15 p.m. Saturday, February 1 4th 

Route 206 and Cherry Valley Road 

Tickets $4.00 

For reservations call 924-4014 



Jh c J' i ii i eel on V5« ft el -\>< Ielij 



f 



Audree Estey. Director 
Announces 

YOGA CLASSES 

10-Week Sessions -$30 

Wednesdays, slarnng Feb 18 

Fridays, slarting Feb 20 

10 AM 

Taught by Merlynn Dixon & Suzanne Kernan 

Men. women — Learn to relax lo cope with Hies 
Ageless techniques lo achieve serenity, poise, will power and 
inner strength. One class geared lo Ihe Irankly 40 plus 

PRINCETON STUDIOS 
262 Alexander SI. 

To register call 609-921-7758 between 10 AM -noon or 2-5 
PM Monday through Friday. 



Jadwin Benefit Series Presents... 

The Harlem Globetrotters 

Family entertainment at its best, featuring 
the fabulous court antics of the world- 
famous Trotters. Also the colorful war- 
mup session and three great variety acts. 

FEBRUARY 18 7:30 PM 

JADWIN GYM 
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 

Tickets at $5, $4, $3 on sale now at Jad- 
win Gym (adjacent to Palmer Stadium) 
between 9 and 2, Monday thru Friday. 
Mail applications accepted, to include 50' 
handling charge. Ticket office phone: 
(609) 452-3538. 

Proceeds to Benefit Princeton Area 
United Community Fund 



^ivi 



Madeline 

Kahn 
Gene 
Wilder 







SSStJ 



.-:::::"! » 




GOLDEN 

GLOBE 

AWARDS 

BEST PICTURE 1 (DRAMA) 



WINNER 
Of I 



PACK HICHOUOH 
PUMfl 






Check Theatre tor Tir 



■■■■■■■ WZnEZM 

„_„ INASSAUST 914-02631 

" me IHINCIION I 



"1776" Rings the Victory Bell 
In Spirited PJ&B Production 

PJIBs rousing production "{««» •?«* Hunsbergerl 
of "1776 • a a glorious send off ^ n a ° d "^ n a a b , g , bo i d a'nd not- 
tot^Bicentenrualyear Knght mlmber of the 

Pe^S^rnrsic^Tt X e d d ,e| en,ry ^ """ ? 

stirring and often amusing "-nanaiee. 

chronicle of those eventful «_•..„—.. 

days in Philadelphia which led Southern Aristocracy, 
to the birth of our naUon All Representing the op- 

sai - -"ff sass.'ss p'.sj JMg& 

n were to risk their statue is aoutn Carolina s 
properties and lives when they Edward Rutledge < . Robert 
framed the Declaration of Hynes) He is the epitome of 
Independence which forever the aloof and mannered 
severed our colonial ties with Southern aristocrat. He is a 

E-nslanri ke y ''g ure . for as SoUth 

England. Carolinl goes, so go North 

As the curtain rises, Karl Carolina and Georgia 
Light who is brilliant as the The tension mounts, and 
,r^r hie lohn Adams sets the even the caustic and often 
tone for what Ts to come SI broad humor of the exchanges 
Dolores the Congress to between the two opposing 
cSse Mfcefr ■PiddlljrwLd- r«rc« faita to reliev 



News Of The 
THEATRES 



Adams, 
Franklin and their group feel. 
It is at this point that Adams 
steps from the cockpit of 
Congress and addresses his 
wife who has appeared on 
stage. We hear from their 
letters which are full of love 
-.— and longing and sacrifice, 
die". They in turn tell him, Beautiful Mary Alice Witte as 
"For God's Sake, John, Sit Abigail conveys the pain of 
Down" Adams does seat separation which Adam's wife 
himself, but he is like light- must ^ve felt. In this scene 
nine in a bottle. wc senS e the courage and 

The haggling continues, and dedication to liberty which 
we learn that the pro- a lso united them. 

Rebellion forces have been 

unable even to bring the Tne rema inder of the play 
question of independence to CO vers the episodes which lead 
the floor for debate John up t0 ,he final unanimous 
Dickinson of Pennsylvania a pp r0V al of the Declaration of 
leads the opposition As independence by the 
portrayed by Reid White, he is representatives of the thirteen 
a man of lofty character, colonies. In the course of those 
perhaps a little too haughty ^ days from i ate June to the 
and possessed of a sharp and historic Fourth, we are 
stinging wit. treated to such tuneful and 

« .* hilarious romps as "The Lees 

Ben— Toe and All. One of f Virginia", featuring a high- 
those aligned with Adams is spirited and winning per- 
another member of that formance by Bruce T. 
delegation, the venerable chandlee 
Benjamin Franklin. Robert J. 

PaUJUS iS Franklin from hiS Continued on Next Page 

bespectacled face down to his 
gouty great toe. Here is that 
sometimes devious sage 
whose single-minded 
dedication to independence 

11 lead to the final com- 
promise which will realize this 

Mil. 

The wrangling continues, 
and in the ensuing exchanges 
we meet as varied a company 
of men as ever any country 
could call their founding 
fathers. 

Caesa 
great restraint by Bi 
pole, leads the Delaware 
delegation. He is dying from 
cancer, and despite great pain 
he remains in Philadelphia 
because of his commitment to 
independence. Fred R. 
Sheldon is a perfect Colonel 
Thomas McKean, a rugged 
Scot with a proclivity to 
violence generally aimed at 
the remaining member of this 
group, Loyalist George Read 
(JohnDiMonte). 

Seated nearby and 
generally hoisting a flagon of 
rum is Rhode Island's Stephen 
Hopkins. This superannuated 
tippler is the oldest member of 
the Congress and quite 
probably one of the best two- 
tisted drinkers ever to sit in 
that august body. 

Over in the Virginia 
delegation sits silent Thomas 





PL£NTY FREE PARKING 



FREE 



yourself 

from drudgery . 
enjoy the 



FRIDAY NIGHT 

PRIME 




BUFFET 



NASSAU 



PALMER SO. 
PRINCETON 
Telephone: 609-921-7500 



© 



The Dance Co-op 

Modern dance 



flPRRR 

School of Ballet 

Mile Gibbons director 



FILM SHOW FOR 
YOUNG CHILDREN 

Saturday, February 7th 

• THE SNOWY DAY 

• MAKE WAY FOR DUCKLINGS 

• CROW BOY 

• THE STORY ABOUT PING 

• MIKE MULLIGAN AND HIS STEAM SHOVEL 

John Wltherspoon School 9:15 & 10:45 a.m. 
Walnut Lane, Princeton Donation $1 

Tickets available at Hulit's, Hinksons 
and at the door 

To benefit the Chetiy Hill Nutserv School Scholarship Fund. 



Tf| 



McCARTER THEATRE 

ICHAEL KAHN. Producing Director 

\ 



A play suggested by Henry James' novel 
of the 1850's "Washington Square" 

THE HEIRESS 

by Ruth and Augustus Goetz 
directed by Michael Kahn 

"...a refreshing excursion into intelligence and 
good taste" -Brooks Atkinson in The N.Y. 
Times following the 1947 Broadway opening 
of "The Heiress" 

Opens Thursday, Feb. 12, 7:30 PM 
Two Weeks Only Thur Feb. 22! 

Information & Reservations: 

Single Tickets - (609) 921 -8700 

Groups -(609) 921-6588 



From France: Pascal Thomas' 

DON'T CRY WITH 
YOUR MOUTH FULL 

Opening Night Hit of the 1974 New York Film 
Festival at Lincoln Center 

"A bucolic, pastoral comedy which evokes 
echoes of Truftaut. Renoir and Pagnol" 

TUES. FEB. 10 at 7:00 & 9:00 pm 
at 10 McCOSH on the Princeton Campus 



Admission $1 50 (at the door) 

Coming Feb. 10: Satyajrt Ray's DISTANT THUNDER 



Mujic-at-McCarter 
DAVE BRUBECK 
.» QUARTET .,„ 

with PAUL DESMOND • JOE MORELLO • 

EUGENE WRIGHT, 
and TWO GENERATIONS OF BRUBECK 

TUESDAY, FEB. 17 • 8:00 pm 

TICKETS NOW AT BOX OFFICE 
Ore. $6.50 & 5.50; Bale. $6.00 & 5.00 



BOX 526 • PRINCETON. N.J. 08540 
TELEPHONE: 921-8700 (609) 



CHAN'S 

RESTAURANT 



i 



CHINESE - AMERICAN 



Princeton Shopping Center 

Catering to ALL Kinds of Patties 



^ SUGAR HILL, N H 




Spend Your Winter Vacation at a Gracious Old 
New England Inn Sk. Touring - Skating - 
Tobogganing - Entertainment - Sugar-on-Snow - 
Hay Rides. 

Fine Food and Grog 
$23 Per Person/Day MAP. 



Reservations: Tel. (603) 823-5522 
For Princeton Reference, 921 -6205 



Xeux of the Theatres 



There is the whimsiral. 
"But, Mr. Adams", in which 
the quill is passed from man to 
man until poor lovesick Tom 
Jefferson is left to write the 
Declaration. 

One Way Only. Another 
highlight is the stately, "Cool, 
Cool, Considerate Men", a 
dance in which Dickinson and 
his reconciliation sym- 
pathizers move "to the right, 
always to the right, never to 
the left." 

The first act ends with the 
first totally serious song of the 
evening. The Courier (George 
Oliva III) has appeared a 
number of times with gloomy 
messages from (drum roll) G. 
Washington. Now in answer to 
questions from the custodian 
and his young assistant about 
the war, he brings the horror 
of combat to our attention. 
The stage lights dim, and, 
with a soft spotlight 
highlighting the suffering in 
his face, he hauntingly tells of 
the plight of a dying, young 
soldier calling out to his 
searching mother, "Mama, 
Look Sharp." 



PEACOCK INN 

20 Bayard Lane (Rt. 206) Princeton 

The 1 776 home of Jonathan Deare ' 

An Inn since 1912 

CELEBRATE AMERICA'S 

200th BIRTHDAY ALL YEAR 

LONG AT THE PEACOCK INN ! 

*/f's Our Bicentennial Too! 

FINE FOOD COCKTAILS 

OVERNIGHT LODGINGS 

Luncheon: Noon to 2:30 
Monday through Friday 

Dinner: 6 to 10 
Monday through Saturday 

Closed Sundays 
924-1707 



Dra cula? A Blood Donor? 

No, it's the other way 
around, come to think of it 
The George Street 
Playhouse in New Brun- 
swick — which just hap- 
pens to have "Count 
Dracula" on the boards 
(Fridays and Saturdays, 
8:30, Sundays, 7:30. Feb 7, 
13 and 14, midnight) — is 
joining with the Central 
New Jersey Chapter of the 
Red Cross' blood donor 
program to sponsor 
"Donor Day" this Friday 
Leave your blood at the 
Playhouse, 414 George. 

The old Count himself, en 
costume, has promised to 
appear and to restrain his 
appetite. Make your blond- 
donator appointment by 
calling 201-246-7717. 

The improbable alliance 
of Count D and the blood 
donor program was the 
inspiration of a Spotswood 
resident active in both 
theatre and hospital 
volunteer work. 

"It was a natural," he 
said. 
I 



The 

WOODEN 

NICKEL 

354 Nassau Street 
924-3001 



Turn on with a sub trom< 

AUON'S 

157 Withsrspoon St. 

Open Sundays 

9219630 



4 



* * " '■' * * 



V k & 6 WA 

A 600RMET CHINESE RESTAURANT 
HAS NOW RE-OPENED 



'« IM f«Mn .1 I.I,... Mat »«*« 1 lit** Cum 

134! 9rum.nl in. lit US I, liunmd Circle) 
Frenton 392 1122 



i 7 

it 

: 

i? 

4 



-Lawrence A. Mansier 



3 



a#cc#aE#£ «p g#g#sa»=»fe*»a 



mints 




nnD 
<&pir/!s 



INGLENOOK VINEYARDS 

Navalle Series 
BURGUNDY - Full bodied, Mellow, Dry. 

RUBY CABERNET - Slightly Dry. Medium Bodied, 
Smooth Taste. 

k CHABLIS - Fresh, Crisp Taste with a pleasant 

Flavor. 
.FRENCH COLUMBARD - Medium Dry, Fruity 
Flavor, Flowery Aroma. 

Fifths $2.1 5 
Magnum Decanters $4.04 

Tax Included 



many children of early school 
age, thoroughly enjoyed the 
The tone of the second act performance. There most 
has been set by the soldier's certainly would have been 
lament. The humor does not more sold out houses if the 
come so often now as the production had run one more 
pressure for independence wee « 
increases not only on the 
delegations, but on each man. _ 
It comes down finally to the TO SING FOR HUNGER 
slavery question. Unanimous Benefit Planned. H 
consent must be given for the chapin, singer-guitarist 
Declaration to be ratified, and P ve two benefit performances 
South Carolina withholds her 'or WHY - the World Hunger 
vote because of its stand Year project - on Friday, 
against slavery. February 27, at 8 and 11 p.m 

Adams balks, and South in Alexander Hall. 
Carolina's Rutledge (Robert Chapin is sponsored in these 
Hynes) in a powerful and performances by the 
emotional performance of Undergraduate Student 
"Molasses to Rum" calls him Government at Princeton 
and New England to task for University. Proceeds will go 
their hypocrisy. He reminds toward WHY, a new foun- 
Adams that New England dation of which Chapin is a co- 
prosperity comes from its founder. The organization 
involvement in the slave develops educational 
trade. Adams, with the stink programs on world hunger 

of the slave ships in his 

nostrils and the sight of the For the past two years, the 
auction block in his mind, singer has visited high schools 
cannot make a reply Finally, and colleges, performing 
he gives in to Franklin's some of his best-known hits, 
urgings. lute "Taxi" and "Cats in the 

Cradle." After his 90-minute 

A Fine Beginning. The show, he talks to the audience 
compromise is made so that a about his involvement in the 
new nation can be born hunger movement, and his 
Franklin, in his defense of this reasons for founding WHY. 
action, states, "They will continuMonN«tp a> e 

remember that we were men, 
only men." 

But what men they were! It 
is our sense of their having 
risen to this challenge and our 
awareness now of the 
magnitude of their act that 
rises from this play as 
powerfully as that new nation 
rose from this auspicious 
beginning. 

In order for us to have 
realized the play's full intent, 
a fine balance had to be 
maintained between the comic 
and the serious. Director 
Milton Lyon displayed both his 
long experience -..nd his ar- 
tistic insight in bringing this to 
pass. 

Lowell B. Achziger's setting 
and lighting evinced a fine eye 
for line and color, and along 
with Ruth Tighe's costumes, 
showed a sure grasp for the 
essence of the colonial period. 

Mr. Lyons and Don Boroson 
at the twin pianos with Sarah 
Hommel, was a thoroughly 
fitting accompaniment for the 
production. A perfect meld of 
1 music and voice allowed the 
singer to carry the day 
without the usual electronic 
amplification. 
It is a shame that this PJ&B 
I production of "1776" ran for 
only one weekend. The 
udience, which included 




PEKING EXPRESS 
RESTAURANT 

Authentic Chinese Cuisines 

31 Station Drive 
Princeton Jet., N.J. 
799-9891 or 799-3334 
Open at 11 AM 



P^i^^ilj^nil^ 



t Chinese feast g 

W ft*. Every Wednesdoy C.eniog ^ ^ 

V S$L Open Salad Bar -&- | 

hi Chinese Soup • Egg Roll ot 

^jj Barbecued Spareribs • Fried Shrimp ig 

M Plus At Least Three M 

WC Surprise Chinese Entrees 

^ $-1.50 per person 

JS Reservations Recommended J46-0II0 )$ 

fir Regular Menu Selections Also Available 5? 

% CHARLEYS I 

$ BROTHER £ 



ij^^(^ij^hiij^r^^ ^>m<ii£i i>r^t y.i 



174 Nassau Street 
(next to Davidson's) 



924-0279 
924-0273 



Free Delivery Free Parking 

Open 9-9 Mon. thro Thun., 
Fri. < Sot. 9 a.m. til 10 p.m. 




US ROUTE 27 FRANKUN PARK. N.J 

TEL (201 ) 297-9496 




How about a taste of Country Club fare ? 

You, too, can dine out Country Club Style every day at fabulous Porsgate Conn- 
try Club without buying a membership fee The food is superb and moderate in 
cost. Try Forsgate yourself and see FORSGATE. Exit SA New Jersey Turnpike 
Open every day. Call 201-521-0070 for reservations. 



Ballet by 

IMOGEN 

KEHOE STUDIO 

Tues, Fn S. Sat 
921-6271 



Qualit y House Plant? 

at 

Sensible Prices 

Mazur Nursery 

Bakers Basin Rd.' 
587-9150 ^_ 



winter 

c 

L 
E 
A 
R 
A 
N 
C 
E 

BAILEY'S 

Princeton Shopping Center 
Mon-Sat. 10-5:30 Frl. me III C 



bf Hel A||as. (eg. Pharm 

Voluntary medical- 
care plans are designed 
to assist the individual 
and his family in 
avoiding financial 
hardship when ill health 
or accident occur. 
Through comparatively 
small regular payments 
the unpredictable costs 
of medical and hospital 
expenses are partially 
or entirely covered. The 
acceptance of the 
prepayment health 
insurance principle took 
place in the 1930's, when 
Blue Cross originated in 
Texas. It then spread 
rapidly throughout the 
country Today, ap- 
proximately 75 percent 
of the American 
population is enrolled in 
some form of voluntary 
health insurance. 

What is a pharmacy? 
At FORER PHAR- 
MACY, 160 Wither- 
spoon, we take pride in 
our profession and 
provide our patrons 
with the best in phar- 
macy care. We check 
with you for drug 
allergies, explain the 
proper storage and 
expiration of your 
medicines, explain the 
doctors directions and 
hopefully have your 
complete confidence. 
Won't you rely on us for 
all your pharmaceutical 
needs now? 

HELPFUL HINT: 

Save powder puffs. 
They can be washed 
with your clothes ; it will 
save you money, and 
you will not rub oil ajid 
dirt back into your skin. 




News of iheThmlre* 

Conl,nu*<l from pf««Jln« P»g« 

Before each concert, he holds 
discussion sessions in 
classrooms with small groups 
of students 

Tickets are on sale at the 
McCarter box-office, 921-8700 

•DON'T CRY " 

French Film. The 
"dailyness" of people's lives 
in the French countryside is 
the theme, without an actual 
structure or plot, of the 
French film, "Don't Cry with 
your Mouth Full." It's 
scheduled for screening next 
Tuesday at 7 and 9 p m. at 10 
McCosn on the University 
campus as part of McCarter 
Theatre's film series 

The 1974 film depicts one 
summer in the life of Annie, a 
15-year-old girl growing up in 
rural France. Her boyfriend is 
drafted, her aunt dies, her 
grandfather tries a little In- 
cest and Annie herself makes 
her way through it all, 
somehow. "A finely 
disciplined film," said one 
New York critic, "lazily funny 
and gently bawdy, which 
doesn't seek the easy laugh or 
ask for gratuitous sentiment." 

SONG! DANCE! WINE! 

And Unitarians. Two per- 
forming groups from Prin- 
ceton University, the Triangle 
Club and The Footnotes, will 
provide some of the gaiety — 
the audience presumably 
providing the rest - at a 
Valentines night cabaret to be 
held at the Unitarian Church 
Saturday, February 14, at 
,8:15. The church is on Route 
206 and Cherry Hill Road. 
Proceeds from the cabaret 
will go toward the church's 
roofing fund. 

In a kind of mini - Triangle 
show, an ensemble of Triangle 
Club members will stage a 
revue of songs, dances and 
skits selected from last year's 
"American Zucchini" which 
has just completed its holiday 
tour, all the way back to 
•Ham and Legs'" the 1952 



L 



~J 



show 

The Footnotes, formed in 
1959 as a footnote to the 
Princeton University Glee 
Club, blends 16 voices in close, 
close harmony, unac- 
companied. They have just 
toured Vermont ski areas and 
Florida resorts. 

Both acts will be presented 
in a cabaret setting, with wine 
served at candle - lit tables. 
Reservations — and you don't 
have to be a Unitarian — may 
be made by calling Margaret 
Aronson, 9244014. Tickets are 
$4 each. 

FITZGERALD, ALONE 
In One-Woman Show. 
Geraldine Fitzgerald, star of 
films, stage and TV, will give 
her one - woman show, "Songs 
of the Streets," at the George 
Street Playhouse, New 
Brunswick, on Saturday, 
February 28 She will present 
one show at 7:30 p.m and 
another at 10 p.m. 
Nominated for an Academy 
• Award for her performance in 
"Wuthering Heights," Miss 
Fitzgerald received the 
Variety Critics Award for her 
work in Eugene O'Neill's 
"Long Day's Journey Into 
Night " She was theco- star of 
Laurence Olivier in the TV 
presentation of "Moon and 
Sixpence," and has appeared 
in such recent films as "Harry 
and Tonto" and "The Last 
American Hero." 

"Songs of the Streets" has 
been presented in Lincoln 
Center, New York in the NY 
Cultural Center, at the Long 
Wharf Theatre in New Haven 
and the Upstage Cabaret 
Theatre, Westport. 



&$$+$&&<&+*+$+*++$$ 

*■/##*? 



Pn 



(jarden 



'nnceton Jea 

Chinese-American Restaurant 

— Take Out Service — 
"222PS'. m 924-2145 



X 




ike it. 




Is then a better reason 
to send an PTD LoveBundle? 



Would she prefer 
the simplicity 
of delicate 

Valentine flowers 
a bud vase? 

Usually available 

for less than 



X v/ businessman, each FTD Member 
Florist sets his own prices 



Send these beautiful blossoms to your special Valentine 
today She'll get the message. 

Your FTD Florist will send your LoveBundle'" Bouquet 
by wire, almost anywhere in the U.S. and Canada— the FTD 
way (Many FTD Florists accept American Express and 
other major credit cards.) 

Saturday. Feb. 14 is Valentine's Day, so order now. 
But remember, say FTD ..and be sure. 

LoveBundle 1 1 /TOO' 

usually available J_ £f 
tor less than 



Reach out and touch her.the FTD Florist way! 




THE FLOWER BASKET 

110 NASSAU STREET PHONE 924-2620 

SECOND SHOP 
PRINCETON NORTH PHONE 924-2600 
SHOPPING CENTER 



frty 



FLOWER SHOP 

"Flowers by Wire" 

360 Nassau Street 

(609) 924-9340 

Free local delivery Off street parking 



"Flowers with a FUdr" 

ALLEN'S FLOWERS 



43 West Broad St. 
466-0062 



Hopewell 
924-9515 



CUT FIOWEBS — PUNTS — FlOHAl. DECORATIONS 



OppisqaisL 



FLORAL SHOP 

47 Palmer Square-West Telephone 924-0I2I 
Princeton. New Jersey 



^Icltfpkcltf 



^ 



incTTS 

2*4 Nassau j»jg« 



REILLEYS MEAT 

MARKET 
22WitherspoonSl. 

"Fine Meal & Poultry" 
924-1085 



MUSIC 

/fi Princeton 




Dr. Lean C.-Nurock 

Optometrist 

84 Nassau St 

Princeton 

For An Appointment 

Call 924-0918 



the Masterpiece Laboratory Ted Stern, from Pittsburgh, 
Workshop in Brooklyn and is a uses the pedal steel guitar as a 
guest artist with Concert jazz instrument as well as in 
Royal its more traditional role in 

Sponsored by the Friends of some of the progressive 
Music, the concert is free and country - oriented selections of 
open to the public the band Percussionist Leslie 

AMATFimsTn MFE-T B 5"? tt \ fr0m St LouiS ' Provides 

BRUBECKBACK F „ r m h i h . added '""-'cacy to the rhythm 

Silver Anniversary. Dave ••Elijah." The i Princeton M " ell , as f om "ocal Sj 

Brubeck will come to Prin- Society of Musical CateurS is^wt wh'eX^ T± 

ceton Tuesday. February 17. will meet on Sundav at 4 in the u . a £ e i"„ f £ om 

to launch a special concert Tmtonan Ch^Ch r^ HU1 T^u.ntn ' D^eviou^lv ^n 

tour celebrating the silver Roa d and Route 206 Lnds in Wa?hfnXn n r 

anniversary of the founding of Members and euests are „ u u Wash ' n «< ; on .. DC, 

.he Dave Brubeck Quartet. J^ ™te thl cfiS? from Sectnc pia'no" '"raanYnS 

The jazz musician will play the resnlar «i-h»rfni» eieciric piano, organ and 

McCarter, and the concert will Professor Merrill Knann , rf u° Cals C S." rad Deisler ' from 

startat8pm the Princei n PP i Housl0 ". Texas, plays electric 

Saxophonist Paul Desmond Music Departmen^wili su ,,ar and d °es s <m>e singing. 

D n avrB ™tec r k m o e u™rte?o f f tne ST^S' ' ^l?*"??" 1 * ORCHEaTSTlO PLAY 
^and™6te JoVMorelloand M f, ndelss ° h ° s E ''l ah ' *'"• Joseph Kovacs Conductor. 
Eulene Wrign. wm tp°pear lisTs ' Judv N^cosTa V* S " 68 '^ M ^ Cum ot 
wifij Brubfck and PP .he "; Lo* .iver^a 'to-; TS^A^JfiT, 
McCarter concert will mark j h n Mel ain tenor' anri "■ ->"=>t;pn rvovacs, will give a 
the first reunion of these Gordon Myers bass performance on Sunday, 

originals for almost a decade_ No auditions'are required to Mercer^Countv CommuniW 
ton y q e U ars et a d E o ba so d fha a , b it -"?,'" '"« chorus, b^ modest Allege lEXS on™St 
mem^ cTld^fof.ow n* „'.«£ u , ^V^sL'.! "' 1?™^ , ™, e 
dividual careers. K" e \™ ^L^thouTa P^^beTs C '"can„°n " 

tn recent years, Dave yearly membership, to cover Haydn's "Concerto in ' C 
Brubeck has been appearing music and refreshments. All Major " Mozart's "Con 
I with his three sons Chris students are admitted without cer antes Guar let" and 
Darius and Dan, and they will charge . For reservation or G e rm an da nc« a J Haydn 
be in the silver anniversary further information, call Mrs. y y 

program, too Michael Ramus, 924-4266 The Collegium's first public 

BAROQUE MUSIC SUNDAY S0N G RFrTrM PI AIMNFn a PF« arance , was ■" M W 1972 in 
At Woolworth Center. "" r^ ' ^ " ^ the Cultural Center of the New 

Soprano Ann Sease - Monoyios , „,' ?***£ °"f,f J°l r J} n ° J"sey State Museum. Since 
will give a concert of Baroque o^My'Zta ta " haS g™,™""™" 
music, assisted by members J3 a ° t f w^fmi^teT Choir P ?°f am a S DD n ear e e W d '7 "st" 
VSLSS f iSSSS£ 9 A *&*• .. 0". „T«esday. T a h S mas a c P a e t a h r e dra. g N £ 

York City The Collegium is 



SPECIAL APPOINTMENTS 
MISS ROSA 

European Facials Cellulite Treatments 

Body Massage Lactol Manicures 

Deluxe Pedicures Leg Waxing 

Unwanted Hair Removal 

ARTISTIC HAIRDRESSERS 

42 WiTHERSl'OON ST. 

924-4875 




original instruments, at February 10, at 8. To be held i 
Woolworth Center on Sunday „„ ^p^ playhouse, it i 
at 3. Works by Purcell Bach, open t0 F tne pu g| lc without 
Fasch, Rameau, Telemann charge 
and Clerambault will be pi| n jst David Aaler a 
performed by Randall Cook, former member of 'the 
baroque oboe and recorder; Westminster faculty will 
Michael McCraw, recorder accompany Miss Laverty 
and baroque bassoon; Sandra Also assisting will be cellist 
Miller, baroque flute; James Elizabeth Lamb, and flutist 
Richman, harpsichord; and Mary Louise Reed 

Richard Taruskin, viola da 

gamba Miss Laverty, an associate 

Miss Monoyios received her professor of voice at West- 
M.A in musicology from minster, spent the 73-74 
Princeton in 1974, and while a academic year in Paris 
student here gave numerous engaged in advanced study of 
performances She was a the French art song with 
soloist with the Glee Club and Pierre Bernac and Irene 
was a founding member of Aitoff. This recital is a direct 
Musica Alta. Now living in outgrowth of this sabbatical 
New York, she is studying study, 
opera with Leyna Gabriele at Miss Laverty's all-Ravel 
program will include "Five 
Greek Folk Songs," 
"Histoires Naturelles," 
"Chansons Madecasses" and 
"Sherazade". 

PROGRAM LISTED 
For Music Club Meeting. 
The Music Club will meet at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. T.C. 
Allen on Wednesday, 
February 11. 

Songs by Purcell, Britten 
and Warlock will be per- 
formed by Selma Ehrlich, 
soprano, and Margaret 
Lambert, piano. Beethoven's 
Serenade, Opus No. 25, will be 
played by Curt Carlson, violin, 
Susan Chamberlain, viola, 
and Jim Scott, flute. 

A Poulenc number will be 
sung by Jean Thomas, 
soprano with Margaret 
Lambert accompanying The 
program will conclude with 
works by Saint-Saens and 
Milhaud performed by 
pianists Doris Allen and 
Margaret Lambert. 

IZMISM FEATURED 
At Inn Coffeehouse. The 
Princeton Inn Coffeehouse 
will present an evening of 
music by Izmism on Thurs- 
day from 9:30 to midnight. 
The free performance marks 
the group's debut in the 
Coffeehouse, and the public is 
invited to enjoy the music and 
refreshments. 

Izmism, an electrical jazz- 
rock-boogie mechanism, 
builds its repertoire from 
some original music, as well 
as from other sources. 
Material is drawn from such 
jazz artists as Billy Cobham, 
Herbie Hancock and Grover 
Washington to Jeff Beck, 
Santana and Deodatos, from 
funk musicians such as 
Mandrill and Buddy Miles to 
country jazz-rock artists such 
as Commander Cody and 
Charlie Daniels. The diversity 
of the six performers lends 
credence to the wide range of 
selections Ed Eicher of 
Princeton is the drummer 



WESTMINSTER 

presents 

FESTIVAL OF AMERICAN MUSIC 

ORGAN EVENT I 

ROBERT CARWITHEN. GEORGE MARKEY, 

AND EUGENE ROAN 

performing music of 

BOLCUM, BUCK, SOWERBY 
Monday, February 9, 8 p.m. 

BRISTOL CHAPEL $3.00 

Westminster Choir College 

Hamilton Ave. at Walnut Lane 

609-921-7100 921-3202 



J 




Only the Best Counts Here 




The LuxmanT-3lODolbyizecl Tuner 

sonex 

AUDIO 



Coming Soon, 
Mogneplanars 



130 Washington Street 
Rocky Hill 
609-924-8787 



Sale ^ 




REVOLUTIONARY 

DREAM 
POOL 



PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS 

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1976 8:30 PM 

McCARTER THEATRE 

TICKETS: $6.95 and $5.50 
Students: $2.50 (day of concert) 
at the Box Office (921 -8700) 



1976 



Oinrn Pools Minulicturm. 
builds t tustomi m pool s 
node of: ffiBa 



VINYL 

• ALUMINUM 

• GALVANIZED STEEL 

• FIBERGLASS 

• CYPRESS & CONCRETE 
IN ANY SHAPE OR SIZE CALL OR 
WRITE NOW FOR FREE SURVEY 



Want to see how we do it? Ta 



ENJOY YOUR VACATION AT 

HOME WITH YOUR FAMILY! 

Start the Bicentennial! 

Celebration with a bang! 

Order your Dream Pool now! 

Installation crews are 

available for early installation. 
Why pay high gas and food 
prices and fight traffic. Now 
you can afford the fun and 
excitement of having a quality 
pool at your own home. Don't 
miss out on this Revolutionary 
S ale!_ 



COME CELEBRATE THE 

MOTH BIRTHDAY OF 

AMERICA IN YOUR VERY 

OWN IN-GROUND DREAM POOL 



Want to see how we do It? Take a trip througf 
Trenton Factory at 3303 Brunswick Pike 
any day 9 TO 8 DAILY OR 10 TO 5 WEEKENDS 
We'll be happy to sho 1 



NOTHING FIIE 
NO GIMMICKS 

you and the family around * HON8ST VALUE 



Princeton & Vicinity 

896-1818 




l 3303 8RUKSWICK PIKE. TRENTON. NJ 0«A« 

Tt mort no-obignort titormtOon 



MAJOR & MINOR 
STRING REPAIR 

Cordas House of Music 

4-9 Dally. 95 Sal 
982-0083 Pannlnplon 



= I Moore's Muse Repair Shop 

•S | MUSIC REPAIR 

„ ta Professional Repairs on 
jE* I All Musical Instruments 

S I r**™™ 443-3552, 



Mwtir iii Princeton 



VIA NO 

TUNING AND 
«..,...*. .. „ »« 
Rain /' 'V 

WILLIAM DAHST ^ 
466-3359 .. 39MS71^ 



BARRY 

PFTERSON 



'RUCROCKfrflUJES 



13 B»f*K STBKT 
9217781 




Doug Smith'73,p,. 
Mimmi Fulmer'74 

Soprano o-d P, 



A complete selection 
ot yarns, patterns and 
needle point equip- 
ment tor hours ot 
relaxation and lasting 
beauty 

THE KNITTING 
SHOP 

TulaneSt 



TRINITY 
ALL-SAINTS \ 
NURSERY 
SCHOOL 



Trinity-All Saints' Nursery School I 
DOW accepting applications lor 197E 
77 in its five-day non-cooperatlv 
for three I ' ' 



Call Mrs. McCrudden 

at 924-7046 

for information 



servation at the slate asylum out for all the gusto they can, 

instead of straining his back and who cares if the pace 

continued trompreceoino pane on a work farm, Jack falters at times or if the 

the resident orchestra of the Nicholson's highly charged characters sometimes take 

Trinity - All Saints Churches performance will probably themselves seriously In fact, 

in Princeton earn him another shot at next the producers were so caught 

Tickets for the per- year's Oscar for Best Actor. up in the film's joie de vivre 

formance, sponsored by the Nicholson soon becomes the that they changed the original 

Mercer County College Office rallying point for his fellow ending in which Reynolds and 

of Community Services, are $3 patients and the result is an Hackman were killed, and 

general admission, $1 students immediate clash with the installed the traditional happy 

and senior citizens free. To indomitable Head Nurse ending. 

reserve seats, call the MCCC whose dogmatic and 

Office of Community Services moralistic approach to her 

at 586-4800, extension 227 patients is 180 degrees away 

from Nicholson's free- 

CONCERT RESCHEDULED wheeling solutions. 
| For Pennington Library. Nicholson's reign as king of 
i The second annual concert to the asylum is vivid but short- 
benefit the Free Public lived; the film ends on a 
i Library of Pennington will be dispairing, numbing note, 
held Sunday. February 15, at Before that, however, there 
4:30 at the home of Dr. and are two noteworthy sequences 
Mrs Giuliano Gorelli on of power The best has 
-J Scotch Road, Hopewell Nicholson turning the ward 
1 Township Two harpsichords into an unruly cheering sec- 
, will be featured, including one lion sitting around the blank 
built by Robert Wilson, used screen of a television set and 
by the Trenton Symphony, and going increasingly wild as he 
loaned to Olga Gorelli. gives a play-by-play 

The program will include description of a phantom 
Concerto No. 2 in C Major for ballgame. A fascinating film. 

Two Harpsichords and the 

Sonata No 6 in A Major for PLAYHOUSE 

Flute and Continuo by J S Lucky Lady. Why not take 
Bach; Sonata in A Major for three of today's most popular 
Cello and Piano by film stars, pick a situation 
Beethoven; Concertino for that throws them togetherand 
Flute and Piano by then let them wisecrack and 
Chaminade; 200 Years a play off one another just for 
Sonata for piano by Olga sheer entertainment. It's been 
Gorelli; and Trefoil, for piano, done hundreds of times by 
six hands, by W. F.E.Bach. Hollywood, not always with 
Performers will be Clarence satisfying results, but when 
Chang and Olga Gorelli, the chemistry is right, the 
pianists and harpsichordists; results can be. ..well as good 
Elizabeth Lamb, cello; and as they are in "Lucky Lady." 
Everett Shaw, flute. Film companies traditionally 
Donations will be accepted by save their best pictures for the 
the Library Aides and refresh- Christmas holiday - or the 
ments will be served. ones they think audiences will 

most enjoy - and "Lucky 

JW of, he Theatres ^Zc^slt^ 
, The major characters are 

three, all of them very good 
indeed. Liza MineLU is Claire 
_. Dobie, a 1920s rumrunner, 
. ™ e aided and abetted by Burt 

»*«« h i A ^ h0Ugh J. he Reynolds and Gene Hackman. 

fi?* fffl? the comedy jjh are in love with Claire. In 

and much of it is pretty rough rlinninB h00ze UD the 

stuff, "One Flew Over Tne 3 0n f ia *JST t*y have 

Cuckoo's Nest" is well worth brushes with the Coast Guard 

being put through the wringer, and ' 'The Mob, ' ' which frowns 

Based on Ken Keseys best- on free-wheelers, 
selling chronicle of a \fs a breezy, carefree, 
boisterously free spirit who frothy existence as they reach 

gleefully disrupts the ordered 

apathy of a lunatic asylum, bv their own circulation figures, no 

the message of the film - that cmno To^N 9 ^opics"abimv to 'tate 

society's apparent misfits are 

potentially more sane than 

those who would keep them 

under lock and key -- is 

somewhat dated. But though 

that premise would provoke 

few raised eyebrows, the film, 

as directed by lYlilos Forman, 

is frequently riveting. Its 

tragicomedy relevance boils 

down to the individuals 

spirit's need to soar away 

from repression of any sort 

As Handle P. McMurty, a 
cheerful, brawling petty 
convict who feigns insanity so 
that he can spend most of his 
six-month stretch under ob- 



HULIT'S SHOES 

Hours: Mon. to Fit 9 to 5:30. Sat. 9 to 5 

140 Nassau St. 924-1952 



RARK 
[SHOP 



ERIK 
SATIE 



SAT., FEBRUARY 14 8:30P.M. 




EN 



IOO 



PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 
Music Department - Chapel Music - Graduate School 



One 



GARDEN 




DON SMITHERS, Baroque Trumpet 
WILLIAM NEIL. Harpsichord and Organ 



LECTURE-DEMONSTRATION 



FEB. 15 - 3:00 P.M. - WOOLWORTH CTR. 




CONCERT 



Purcell, J.S. Bach, Couperin, Scarlatti, Torelli 
FEB. 15 - 8:30 P.M. - PROCTER HALL (Grad. College) 
BOTH EVENTS ADMISSION FREE 
IOC30 1 l OCTOl 




The Friends of Music at Princeton 



SHIRLEE EMMONS, S o Prano 
STANLEY SONNTAG, ««, 

ALL-AMERICAN MUSIC 

from the 18th to the 20th century 
FRI., FEB. 6, 1976 - 8:30 P.M. 



ANN SEASE-MONOYIOS, 



Soprano 



with members of the 
CONCERT ROYAL 

BAROQUE MUSIC 

ON 
ORIGINAL INSTRUMENTS 

SUN., FEB. 8, 1976 -3:00 P.M. 



WOOLWORTH CENTER ADMISSION FREE 



IT'S NEW 

To Us 






dreary month of February has 
liever had much to recom- 
:nend it. Sandwiched between 
1'anuary, which ushers in the 

I 'Jew Year and March, which 
>Hngs the first signs of spring, 
t has little to offer but four 
nore weeks of winter weather 
ike this past Monday mor- 
ling 

j However, there is a positive 
iiote. Besides being the 
shortest month, it contains 
many holidays including 
Valentine's Day, a time to 
indulge in a little frivolity and 
spread some love around. 
With this in mind, we visited 
stores around town and culled 
a few suggestions on what to 
give your loved ones. 

A heart-filled box of 
chocolates is probably the 
most traditional way to say 
"Be Mine," and Princeton is 
fortunate in having an ex- 
cellent candy store, Polly's 
Fine Candies on Palmer 
Square has red, gold and pink 
hearts trimmed with bows and 
flowers by Blum's and 
Schrafft's from 98 cents to 
$8.98. 

The super kiss is back again 
-this year - almost a pound of 
milk chocolate wrapped in 
silver foil. However, if you 
would rather give a more 
genteel kiss, there is a new 5- 
ounce Jr. -sized one, $3.20 and 
$1 60 respectively. 

Candies for Children. 

Children love all holidays and 
Polly always has a great 
selection of novelties just for 
them. All set for mailing is a 
yellow pad with LUV scrat- 
ched across the front and a 
chocolate heart inside, or a 
red foil card filled with 
another chocolate heart, $1 
each. 

You'll also find red lollipops 
that say "kiss me," fluffy love 
bugs to tie on packages and 
Polly's own selection of 
crystalized, mello or butter 
cream hearts in red, white and 
pink. 






.*- 



melody of an old harpsichord, 
$135. However, there are less 
expensive ones too, such as a 
wooden one with an inlaid 
design on the cover that when 
open reveals a jewel box, $35 

Then to continue this 
romantic thought, why not 
tuck inside the box a pretty 14 
kt. gold locket with a delicate 
floral design or a sculptured 
sterling wire heart. 

Sterling Kisses. More candy 
kisses are at La Vake's, 
Nassau Street, only this time 
they are sterling or 14 kt. gold 
ones, both of which come in a 
regular or mini size, $7.50 to 
$180. 

You'll find hearts here too, 
including diamond ones for an 
elaborate gift of love. Our 
favorite however, was Elsa 
Peretti's graceful sculptured 
gold heart that hangs on an 
angle, $45, and there are 
pierced earrings too. 

There is something most 
appealing about little boxes, 
whether filled or simply given 
for themselves. From Kash- 
mir we saw a handsome 
papier mache gold heart 
decorated with a tree of blue 
birds while by Limoges there 
is a white cylinder box 
decorated with black swirls of 
"I love you," $9 and $7.50. 
La Vake's also has other 
BE MINE: The time for acknowledging secret or not- heart boxes, bone china floral 
so-secret loves is fast approaching, and one of the P tac e cards, and Gorham's 
nicest ways to say "Be Mine" is with an old- magnificent enameled flowers 
fashioned valentine like this one from Country An- " l in Verm eil baskets or 
tiques. 



Ttsuje*- ytc&ti 1 *^ 



Further up Palmer Square 
at Clayton's Main Store we 
found a choice of necklaces 
just right for a young girl. 
There is a blue heart set in 
gold, two cut-out hearts or a 
heart with a key and each is on 
a delicate gold chain, $2.25. 

There is also some 12 kt. 
gold-filled valentine jewelry 
by Winard, such as a porcelain 
bracelet with delicate flowers 
painted on each oval or a 
necklace with another heart 
and key. 

Or if you want something 
small enough to slip in an 
envelope, you might consider 
the pretty handkerchiefs 
trimmed with lace and em- 
broidered red hearts, $1.50 
each. However for a truly 
spectacular gift we would 



choose Echo's newest scarf 
with a lovely multi-colored 
floral bouquet set in a deep 
blue border, $35 and it is 
handsome enough to be 
framed. 

There are lots more flowers 
at Princeton Gift Shop in- 
cluding small arrangements 
of English bone china asters, 
mums and carnations; groups 
of pressed flowers decorating 
the covers of address books, 
note pads and bridge tallies; 
and more bouquets set on 
white or yellow cork mats 
from England, $3.25 to $15. 



Limoges vases. 

Down at The Thome 
Pharmacy, also on Nassau 
Street, there are several 
special purchases. Rive 
Gauche by Yves Saint 
Laurent, Weil's Antelope and 
Zibeline, and Cabochard by 
Gres are all available in spray 
colognes at once-a-year 
prices, $3 to $5. 

These same choices and 
others also come in powder, 
body lotion or, for the ultimate 
gift, in perfume. Thome's has 
an unusually wide selection of 
fragrances, including those by 
Nina Ricci, Carven, Guerlain, 
Lanvin and Dior 



Prin^SS? ru, «£! ?° d something more than youreeU 




vlie L^olfH 



tire 



GIFTS OF JEWELRY 
from Cupid- 
Tell of Your Love! 

H.R. Kalmus 

The Wutch Shop 924-1363 



We're closed for 

water-damage repair 

and will re-open 

Wednesday, February 11 

STONE'S LINEN SHOP 

Elegance in Linens and Gifts 



Established 1908 

20 Nassau St. Princeton 924-4381 

We participate in PARK AND SHOP 

Hours 9 30 to 5 Monday through Saturday 




IS STILL "SALEIIMG 



• VII S U IS I l\ \l. 



FREE PARKING DIRECTLY IN FRONT OF Ol R STORF 
All. 1TF.MS S.t'BJECT TO PRIOR SALE. 




Furniture 

Monday-Saturday 9:30-5:30 



I ALL FLOOR PIECES SOLD AS IS. 



ALL SPECIAL ORDERS AT 
10% OFF 



259 Nassau St. Princeton, N. J. 

wed. Eve. 'til 9 Phone 924-9624 



Engagements 
and Weddings 



ENGAGEMENTS 
Lawrence-Campbell. Miss 
Carol E. Lawrence, daughter 



3 Bruce D Campbell, son of Mr. 
j£ and Mrs D Bruce Campbell, 
f 247 Harrison Street. A (all 
"? wedding is planned . 
Z Miss Lawrence is a 

8" graduate of Montgomery High 
School and is presently era- 
9 ployed by the Princeton 
c Regional Schools. Mr 
J Campbell attended Princeton 
High School and is employed 




Carol E. Lawrence 



Mrs Fagir-Chand Sachdwa of eludes lacy ones from the turn the 19th century as expressed 

New Delhi India A June of the century, mechanical by Raphaelle Tuck : 

wedding is planned ones from the 1930s and even "Only one frown and I'm 

Miss Festa a graduate of a few by Raphaelle Tuck undone 
Notre Dame High School and dating back to 1853 The prices Only one smileand I am won, 
Helene Fuld School of Nur- range from 50 cents to f! 50 for Only one tiny little kiss, 
sing is a staff nurse at Lynn theTuckones Will put an end to my 
hospital in Lincoln Park,. Many of these old valentines distress." 
Michigan Her fiance was are weU worth preserving, 
graduated from MA Medical such as two sets of four that 
School in New Delhi He is a have been mounted on pale 
chief resident in internal satin and placed in bamboo 
medicine at the Veteran's frames, *30 each. Mrs. 
Administration Hospital in Waddell also suggests a book 
Allen Park. Mich. of sentimental poems, 
"Sweetheart of Mine" written 

Hester-Gerrtah. Miss Janet by James Whitcomb Riley and 
Hester, daughter of Dr and romantically illustrated by 
Mrs James M Hester of 21 Howard Chandler Christy or 
Cleveland Lane and Tokyo, the "Rubaiyat of Omar 
Japan, to Campbell T Khayyam, " which is 
Gerrish, son of Mr and Mrs magnificently illustrated by 
Thornton Gerrish of Rye, NY Edmund Du lac 
An August 21 wedding is ; 

planned in Princeton Or for a truly sentimental 

The prospective bride, an 8"", there is a sterling dance 



3 by"Bohren's Moving and Mi „ kllind , fifth „.,,. alumna'of 'the Spence School, program, a beaded evening 
t Storage Co. t^r n, Haddon HeK New York CitV, attended bag orperfume vuUs made of 

* °^ teacher in Haaaon Heignts „... rolleae and pressed glass with sterling 

° Ta.b-Brown. Miss Karen L. Mr Aicher is employed a. an ^mort Col ege and v ^ gJJ an ^^ agg 
..u ............. „» "I. 1 "" 5 .™ 1 ? so on Saturday the 14th, 

keep in mind the sentiments of 



IRIS 

12 Spring Street 

Princeton, N.J. 

924-4377 

Open Monday thru Saturday 



We 're opening up 

\r new spring things... 

jewelry, bafts, 

pretty dresses 

IMPULSE 
CORNER 

Doris Burrell's 
Beauty Salon 
21 Leigh Avenue 

(Closed Monday) 



AntlqueB 



AMERICAN ANTIQUES OF THE IWi and 19th CENTURIES 
METTUCH 

Al Ihe blinkec - SERGEANTSVILLE, NEW JERSEY 
Six miles south of Flemington on Route 523 



Wednesday-Sunday 1 2 to 5 



Bob Griffiths 



and Mrs. Willi 
McClain, 1 Galston Drive, 
M?«^W> is a graduate of Dutch Neck, to William N Princeton University, where 
IawrenJeHiit Sc^landta Hardy, son of Mrs William H he was captain of the rugby 
emnlnJed bv Firmenteh Inc Molnar of New Brunswick team. He is an agent for the 

TpEboro He? fiance an Miss McClain, a graduate of Penn Mutual Life Insurance 
alumnT^Rid^fS, is Edison High School and Company in New York City, 
employed by woolco Bridgewater College, »> 

Depar.mentSU^es.Inc. Zf^LStLZ^ It's New to Vs 

Hlldebrand-Wellemeyer. fiance attended Edison High conim u «i(™ m »r««ir«,o.g. 
Miss Shelley E Hlldebrand, School, St Mary's College and s traw-filled box, is guaranteed 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Immaculate Conception in to ^ genuine and pedigreed, 
Blair Hildebrand of BeUe Troy, N.Y. He is employed as and f co urse has a care 
Mead, to William G. « dancing instructor or n^,^ 
Wellemeyer, son of Mr and Arthur Murray s in Hamilton We found bere something 
Mrs William R Wellemeyer Square. else to tuck in an envelope - 

of Skillman No date has been ~ small pierced earrings that 

set for the wedding Sebo-Talar. Miss Cynthia come attached to their own 

The couple are both Sabo, Daughter of Mr. and i i(t i e greeting cards. Two 
graduates of Montgomery Mr8 Stephen J. Sabo, 284 pearls can be found in a large 
Township High School Miss Fieldboro Drive, Lawren- sm uing mouth, green balls by 
Hildebrand is a student at the ceville, to Leon F. Talar, Jr., a fro g w ho asks "your pad or 
University of Maryland and a son of Mr and Mrs Talar, m j ne ," and two small blue 
part time employee of 1664 Lawrence Road, dowers with a simple "I love 
Washington Inventory Ser- Lawrenceville. An October you ," $2.25 each 
vice Mr Wellemeyer is a 1977 wedding is planned 

graduate of Lincoln Technical Miss Sabo and Mr Talarare Mood Rings. We also liked 
Institute in Union. He is both graduates of Lawrence tne m00( j n^gs that change 
employed by Rowan Co., Inc High School Miss Sabo will ^^ ^th your emotions, the 
of Houston, Tex. graduate from Mercer County handsome Scrimshaw jewelry 

Community College this June commemorating the old 

Embley-Brooki. Miss as a medical laboratory whaling trade, red plastic 
Barbara Embley, daughter of technologist. Mr Talar is a boxes and dried flowers with 
Mr. and Mrs Richard Embley building contractor. which you can make your own 

of 23 Humbert Street, to valentine bouquet. 

James R Brooks. Jr., son of Festa-Sachdwa. Miss Carol Then because Valentine's 
Mr and Mrs. Brooks of 561 Ann Festa, daughter of Mr. Day is really an old-fashioned 
State Road. No date has been an ° Mrs. Jerry A. Festa, 213 concept, maybe the answer is 
set for the wedding New Hillcrest Avenue, an old-fashioned card. Mrs. 

The couple are both Lawrenceville. to Dr Jagdisn waddell at Country Antiques 
raduates of Princeton High H Sachdwa, son of Dr and has a nice collection that in- 



Sc 

Mercer County College 
Brooks attends Trenton 
Technical Institute and is 
employed by the First 
National Bank of Princeton. 

Kim-Relber. Miss Mary K. 
Kim, daughter of the Rev. and 
Mrs Joseph M. Kim of 
Youngwood, Pa., to Thomas 
E. Reiber, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Paul L. Reiber, Jr., of 
Geneva, Switzerland, for- 
merly of Rocky Hill. 

Miss Kim is a junior at 
Chatham College. Mr Reiber 
is a senior at Lehigh 
University. 

Eklund-AIcher. Miss Jeanne 
Eklund, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs Robert J Ecklund of 
Haddon Heights, to Richard T. 
Aicher, Jr., son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Aicher of 5 Monroe 
Avenue, Lawrenceville. An 
August wedding is planned. 



Ricchard's 



"More Than Just Fine Shoes" 



RUMMAGE SALE 

For the Ladies. . .Most fall and winter 
shoes and boots 50% Off 

Men's Sale Continues 

10 - 50% Off 

on most shoes and boots 

Leather, Suede and Sheepskin Clothing 
20% to 50% Off 



1 50 Nassau St., Princeton 



924-6785 




CARPET CARPET CARPET 

REMNANTS REMNANTS REMNANTS 

For nearly thirty years we have been selling the finest 
Carpet roll balances and Remnants at the lowest prices. 

We Still Do! 



Throw rugs, runners, 
stair carpeting 


Small, medium and 
large room-size rugs 


Big selection of kitchen 
and playroom carpeting 


Hundreds of remnants 
to choose from 


All rolled in tubes 
for your protection 


Machines on the job 
to bind your selections 



Mfcffls 



fofBea.BamsrtrfC 
Monnomery Shoppng Center 
Roma 2D6. Rocky HI 

2L22— 



3 



Whatever your CARPETING problem, talk it over with BILL HUBBARD at our warehouse and REMNANT shop, he will make 
every effort lo satisfy your floor covering needs. 

Possibly you need a large amount of CARPETING for your home or offices at a very special price. BILL can show you rolls of 
run out yarn CARPET or discontinued patterns at savings of up to 60%. 

It's all at the Rug & Furniture Mart, Inc. Warehouse & 
Remnant Shop, State Highway 206, Princeton, N.J. 

Tel. 921 -91 00 or 921 -9292 



About Income Taxes.... 

When you fill our your 
Federal Income-tax forms 
(you mean, you haven't 
yet?) be sure you write 
"Princeton Borough" or 
"Princeton Township" 
where it asks for your 
address on the form. Don't 
just say "Princeton." 

It's connected with 
Federal revenue-sharing. 
As a taxpayer, you'll want 
to be sure that your part of 
Princeton gets the credit. 



ningt on, both on January 31 . 

Sons were born to Mr. and 
Mrs . Frank Grubic, 33 
Camaron Court; Mr. and Mrs. 

Lenest Josil, 240 John Street, 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold White, 
508 Village Road, Princeton 
Junction, all on January 26; 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald 
McGrath. n Wisteria Lane, 
Trenton; Mr. and Mrs. 
Michael Thomas, 29 Miry 



Brook Road, Trenton, both on 
January 27; Mr. and Mrs. 
Roger Francois, 230 
Witherspoon Street; Mr. and 
Mrs. Manilal Govan, 52-9 
Gardenview Terrace. 
Hightstown: Mr. and Mrs. 
Jotham Johnson, Box 12, 
Blawenburg, all on January 
28; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 
Urbanek, 16 Oaken Lane, 
Hamilton Square, January 28; 
and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 



Toussaint, 31 Tupelo, January 
30. 

MEETING RESCHEDULED 
By Recreation Board. The 

meeting scheduled by The 
Joint Recreation Board for 
Tuesday, has been 

rescheduled for February 5 at 
8:15, in the Recreation Office 
in the Valley Road School, 
Witherspoon Street. Formal 
action is expected to be taken. 



rmnrr ni niiiiin mm m i ■ i ■ n 
ORLON SWEATERS 

Infants to Size 7 



THE CLOTHES LINE 

On the Square 924-2078 

Hours: 9-5 weekdays, 9-4 Saturdays 



"""""■■ ' f it SMBOSJUUkiA i 

-'• 



Topics of the Town 

King George's seal where the 
Declaration uses "he", for 
"the king", and the death of 
the Hessian commander. Col. 
Johann Gottlieb Rail standing 
in for the word "mer- 
cenaries." German words at 
the bottom are from an 
epitaph composed for Rail's 
gravestone but never used. 

The Battle of the Assunpink. 
in which the British, having 
suffered heavy losses, broke 
off fighting because they 
thought they had the 
Americans' bottled up, is 
portrayed by Joan B. 
Needham. Trudy Glucksberg 
takes the viewer to the 
"Decoys at the Assunpink," 
showing the decoy sentries 
and their brightly burning 
fires which Washington left 



Mae Rockland takes a 
quietly domestic look at the 
war, with "Liberty's Hearth 
Quilt," in which man and wife 
are separated by a weapon of 
war. 

Instead of presenting a 
traditional view of the Mercer 
Oak, Jane Teller treats the 
tree as a legend, and in- 
corporates into its trunk the 
limbs and horse of General 
Mercer- tree and General 
have indeed become one, with 
time. Helen Schwartz has 
examined an 18th century 
"Treatise of Cannon," used by 
both sides in the battle, and 
has translated its technical 
drawings into graphic art. 
Dorothea Greenbaum, usually 
thought of as a sculptor, turns 
to the medium of print for 
"Debris of a Battlefield," in 
which sere' grass and a lone 
shoe tell the mute story. 

In "Victory." MarieSturken 
shows a triumphant 
Washington waving his vic- 
tory sword while the white 
flag of Comwallis signals the 
end of the battle. Nassau Hall, 
where the white flag may have 
flown, is at the bottom of the 
print. 

Ann Gross' map of New 
Jersey follows the action, and 
Judith Brodsky's "George 
Washington Diagrammatic" 
shows the general sculpted as 
a Roman, after the fashion of 
the era, and framed for all 
time with red and white 
bunting. 



TWENTY BORN 
Id Princeton Medical 
Center. In the week ending 
January 31, 11 girls and 9 boys 
were born in the Medical 
Center at Princeton. 

Daughters were born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Harvey Kraslin, 36- 
07 Fox Run Drive, Plainsboro, 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard UU, 765 
Twin Rivers Drive, East 
Windsor, both on January 26; 
Mr. and Mrs. Casey R. 
Kemper, P-ll Avon Drive, 
East Windsor; Mr. and Mrs 
Peter Kop, 174 Estates 
Boulevard, Trenton; Mr. and 
Mrs. Jonathan Miller, 204 
Loetscher Place; Mr. and 
Mrs. James Oberst, n 
Bloomingdale Drive, South 
Somervifie, all on January 28. 

Also to Mr and Mrs. 
Laurence M Brown, 279 
Bolton Road, East Windsor, 
January 29; Mr. and Mrs. Guy 
J Lestician, 7 Brown Drive, 
Hamilton Square; Mr. and 
Mrs. John R. Tindall, 52 
Edgemere Avenue, Plain- 
sboro, both on January 30; Mr. 
and Mrs. Paul W. Phinney, 
RR. 1, Pennington; and Mr. 
and Mrs. William Saunders, 
110 Crawley Avenue, Pen- 



FOIL CIRCLE 

CUSTOMERS GO 

FULL COUR T 

WITH THE 
$e0RE:$12VAUJE 




o 



* 



The Package: 



FREE UNLIMITED CHECKING 

FULL CIRCLE I.D. AND CHECK CASHING CARD 

FREE PERSONALIZED CHECKS 

BOUNCE-FREE CHECKING 

(Normal finance charges apply) 

5% REGULAR SAVINGS 
DISCOUNTS ON LOANS 

FREE MONEY ORDERS, CASHIER 
CHECKS AND CERTIFIED CHECKS 
FREE TRAVELERS' CHECKS 

BANKAMERICARD 

(Normal finance charges apply) 

AUTOMATIC TRANSFER FROM 
CHECKING TO SAVINGS 

FREE BANK-BY-MAIL 



Apply Now! 



Within the past few weeks, each of 

our FULL CIRCLE ACCOUNT customers 

received 6 coupons worth $2 each, 

A $12 VALUE, toward tickets to see the 

great Philadelphia 76ers play the Cleveland 

Cavaliers on Friday, February 6th. 

FULL CIRCLE ACCOUNT is a winner! 
Check our box score to the left or, better yet, 
ask somebody who has the package. 
Apply for your FULL CIRCLE ACCOUNT now 
Don't miss another great deal. 



A great deal . . . getting better 




31 offices throughout Central New Jersey. 
Consult your phone book for the one nearest you. 



Memtei F DiC 



calling 799-3161 evenings The 
public is invited. 

The VMCA Scuba Club will 
present an evening with Stan 
Waterman Friday, February 
13 at 7:30 at the VMCA on 
Avalon Place Peter Ben- 
chley's encounter with the 
Great White Shark in 
Australia and other selected 
rdms not previously seen in 
this area will be shown 

A $1 donation will be 
requested at the door for the 
benefit of the YMCA and the 
New Jersey Council of Divers. 

Fifteen women will be in- 
stalled as members of the 
Montgomery Woman's Club at 
its meeting this Thursday at 
I 8:15 in the Rocky Hill branch 

£ PAID EMPLOYMENT-DOES IT PAY? Elizabeth Brown (left) will moderate a panel of U>e First National Bank of 
J next Thursday on the pros and cons of full and part-time employment for women. Theciubwill welcome Mrs 
. Also shown are Harriet Pace, coordinator of the seminar for the Professional wiMjam Griesinger, Mrs! 
8 Roster and panelists Kaye Boyer, Helene Hovanec and Barbara Cohen. Byron Johnston, Mrs Jassie 




Members who need a ride 
mav call the YWCA, 924^825. 
before 11 the day of the 
meeting. 



New* Of 

Clubs and Organizations 



The AAUW a 

Professional Roster 

the last in a series of three The panel will include Kaye president 



by a guest speaker from Master, Mrs Myron Savacool 
Public Service. Plans for the and Mrs Allan Taylor, all of 
Valentine's Dance will be Skillman: Mrs Nick Gavares, 
completed Mrs. Richard Glazier, Mrs. 

Buel Grow, Mrs. William 

Officers and executive Kuhlthau, Mrs. Thomas 
board members of the Prin- Neumann, Mrs. Roy Nilsen, 
ceton Community Democratic Mrs Raymond Ryan, Mrs. 
Organ! 



have been Glenn Smith and Mrs. Robert 
the AAUW vice president for elecTed for the current year Zeiseler, all of Belle Meade; 
hold programs. Fred Bohen will serve as and Mrs. Fred Kloiber of 

Jiree The panel will include Kaye president and Mary Rocky Hill Mrs James 
seminars for women Thur- Boyer, executive director, vvisnovsky and Dede Nini as Wiltshire of Belle Mead will be 
sday, February 12, from 9:30 N.J Home Economics vice-presidents from the reinstated following her 
to noon on The Recycled Association; Barbara Cohea Borough and Township return to the area. 
Woman; Paid Employment- assistant program developer, respectively The program, open to 

Does It Pay? The moderator Educational Testing Service; other officers are: LoisEtz, husbands, will center on a 



ill be Elizabeth B 




princeton gallery of fine art 

9 Spring Street Princeton 




Helene Hovanec, research treasurer; John McGoldrick, mini-workshop for do-it 
analyst, Sibson and Company; assistant treasurer; Dorothy yourself furniture refinishing. 
Janice Kunz, director of soper, corresponding Rick Williams of the Wood 
communications, sys- secretary; and William Shed, Bridgepoint Road, Belle 
temedics, Inc.; Ruth sutphin, recording secretary. Mead, will illustrate his talk 
Shulman, administrative The executive board members with a slide presentation, 
coordinator at Rutgers f r0 m the Borough are Ingrid Mrs Galen Goodwin, 
University ; and Edith Severo, Reed, lrv Urken, Ed Sweeney, chairman of hostesses, will 
student assessment advisor at John Huntoon, Frances Craig have Mrs. Edward Mahood, 
Thomas A Edison College in and Jessica Lamkin. From the Mrs Robert McLaughlin, 
Trenton Township, Lankford Boiling, Mrs Joseph Mignella and 

Joan Thomas, Clarence Mrs. John Kostrowski 
The Ladies Auxiliary of the DiDonato, Lucy Mackenzie, assisting her 

Princeton Lions Club will Barbara Lependorf and Tom 

meet for dinner Monday at Lindenfeld Princeton Chapter of 

6.30 at the Nassau Inn. A The next meeting of the Deborah Hospital will meet on 
Bicentennial program on PCDO will be held February Tuesday at 8 in the First 
"New Jersey's Abundant I8at8at the Masonic Lodgeon National Bank of Central New 
Heritage'' will be presented Maclean and John Streets. Jersey. Rocky Hill. The guest 
The speakers will be State speaker will be Jerry Stein, 
Senator Joseph Merlino, coordinator of Lifemobile, 
Richard Zimmer of Common who will present a film "A Life 
Cause and Lucy Mackenzie of on the Lion." 
the PCDO. All members and friends 

are invited. Anyone interested 

Princeton Chapter 459 of the in becoming a member of 
American Association of Deborah may call Lenore 
Retired Persons will hold its Gordon, membership 
regular monthly meeting chairman, 921-8863 or 
Thursday February 12 at 2 at president Jeanne Schechter, 
the YM-YWCA. In addition to 924-6637. Refreshments willbe 
the business meeting, there served, 
will be a program presenting 

"A Tribute to Abraham The Women s College C lub 
Lincoln," and "Revolutionary «"1 meet Monday at 8 in All 
Times - New Jersey 200 Years Saints Church, Van Dyke 
Ag0 .. Road. Dr John R. Martin, 

B Marquand Professor of Art 

A joint program sponsored and Archaeology at Princeton 

by the Jewish center's University will speak on The 

Women's Division and Men's Other Rubens, the Artist as 

Club and Hadassah B'nai Scholar and Diplomat Dr. 

B'rith will take place Sunday Martin is a leading authority 

s, at 8:15 . Miriam Beitan-Julius, on Rubens and has lectured 

S a Philadelphia director and widely in the U.S. and Canada, 

| actress, will make a dramatic having offered courses at the 

3 presentation on the Jewish Metropolitan Museum of Art 

wife, women's lib, prayer for in New York and at the 

peace, Hannah Senesh and her Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

diary, plus other selections. 

Refreshments will be ser 
ved. Families are welcome. Lawrence Township Senior 

Citizens Club 2 will meet 

The Business and Tuesday at the American 
Professional Women's Club Legion Hall, 100 Berwyn 
will meet Monday at 6:30 at Place Games will be held at 
the Service Mall Cafeteria ir noon, followed by the meeting 
Princeton Junction. Carolyn at 1 Plans will be completed 
Landis, former coordinator of for a Valentine's Party on 
the Central New Jersey February^ 
Chapter of NOW, will Refreshments will be ser- 
moderate a program on ve d 
"Rape -- the Aftermath." 

Cathi Collins, coordinator of The Friday Club will meet 
the 1976 task force on rape, Fnday for lunch at 12: 30 at the 
and Jean Lewis, a senior YWCA, Avalon Place. The 
member of NOW will also Rev. Dr. John Bishop will 
speak present slides and com- 

A social hour at 6 will mentary on a recent trip to 
precede the dinner Reser- J a P an and Ho "g Kom J Dr 
vations may be made by Bishop has been in the 




HIGHLAND FARM POTTERY 

Hopewell 

POTTERY CLASSES 

Register NOW for Spring Session 

Starting March 1 
Call for information: 609-466-0130 



RESTORING 

Paintings - Prints 
Photographs, etc. 

IKALEVS FINE ARTS 
73 Palmer Square W. 
Princeton 924-0740 



PRINCETON 
ART ASSOCIATION 

Rosedale Road 
921-9173 



New Jersey 
Botanical Gardens 

PLANT SHOP 

DISSEMINATING: 



LOCATED 
,„ wtfl •( 8°.« tot 
ti loiifc o( featrt'llt (ink 

urt noil nnnti 



THE 

JINGLESTONE 

GALLERY 

presents 

WINTER SCENES 

Oils and Graphics 

• Barbara Carlbon 

• Alexander Farnham 

• John Robertson 
Through FebruP'V 

al Ihe blinker, Sergeantsville, N.J. 
six miles south ol Flemington, on Rl 523 
(609) 397-0077 Open 

(201 ) 996-6333 Wednesday-Sunday 1 2 to 5 



.guild gallery 




Solid candy kiss 
with chain, $180. 
In sterling silver: Candy kiss with chain, 
$17.50 — miniature, $7.50. 



Jewelers & Silversmiths, Est. 1877 

54 Nassau Street, Princeton. N.J. 08540 

(609) 924-0624 






PRINCETON BOOK HART 

11 Palmer Square W 
924-1730 ___ 



Shop 



Rutgers' Height and Speed Decisive Faetors 
In Clear-Cut 75-62 Triumph over Princeton 



NASSAU 
LIQUORS 

94 Nassau St. 
, 924-0031 . 



Princeton 's only 
SHOE SHINE! 
65 c 




5 Palmer Square West 
Princeton, New Jersey 



SPORTS FANS! 
I 




Brought to you 
By John Bernard 

Only nine players in 
the history of college 
basketball have ever 
made the official first 
team All-America three 
times, as a sophomore, 
junior and senior... Can 
you guess the nine who 
have done it?... They 
are David Thompson, 
Bill Walton, Pete 
Maravich, Lew 

Alcindor, Jerry Lucas, 
Oscar Robertson, Tom 
Gola, Hank Luisetti and 
Charley Hyatt. 



Did you know that a 
60-thousand seat sports 
stadium was once built 
for only one event, on 
one day- and then was 
never used again! 
..When France held the 
1968 winter Olympics, 
they built a stadium 
seating 60-thousand 
people intended only for 
the opening ceremony, 
and then tore the 
stadium down after the 
ceremony ! 



Here's a basketball 
oddity... Bob Pettit, one 
of the greatest scorers 
in the history of the 
National Basketball 
Association, who scored 
over 20,000 points in the 
NBA, played an entire 
season for his junior 
varsity team in Baton 
Rouge, La., and didn't 
score a point all year! 



I bet you didn't 
know... that we also sell 
life insurance. 

STURHAHN 
Dickenson 
& Bernard 

"Insurance Specialists" 
14 Nassau St. 
Tel. 921-6880 

••••••••••••• 




bothered the Tigers on oc- 
casion, but they generally 
aged to bring the ball 
downcourt without trouble. 
Having beaten it, however, 
they felt on several times that 
the opportunity for a quick 
unguarded shot existed, and 
more often than not, it tailed 
to click. 

Met fans would have been 
proud - Jadwin abounded in 
signs produced for the oc- 
casion, largely because fans 
were aware of the chance to be 
caught up by Channel 9's 
cameras. It was obvious that 
Rutgers' backers had spent 
more time in this department 
than Princeton's. 



Superior height and speed 
gave Rutgers' basketball 
team a 75-62 triumph over 
Princeton Monday night in 
Jadwin Gymnasium before 
7,556 fans who were seated 
and scores more who were 
standing. In sharp contrast to 
professional games in 
numerous sports, icy roads 
and near -zero weather failed 
to produce hundreds of "no- 
shows" despite the fact that 
the game was widely watched 
throughout the east on 
Channel 9. 

Once in each half, Princeton 
was even with the hustling 
Scarlet, and each time the 
visitors surged ahead to make 
the final outcome secure as 
their 17th victory this winter 

without a defeat. The victors kfl I Although the game 

had entered the contest as the ■■■■ ^— -*BDjJJJJJjl away from home for the 

nation's sixth ranked team, KEY MAN: Armond Hill, Scarlet, a generous Princeton 
the Tigers as 19th. wr ,o directs Princeton's ath| etic department made it 

W(K . , . offense, Is the Tigers' possible for more Rutgers 

With just over ten minutes i Ba rt«.r w |, h „ la.iUint ,ans t0 attend the game than 
to go in the opening period, the .„„" ."ij JL-iTKiH! would have been possible in 
Orange and Black was ahead, f ve,a 9 e ana stands third New Brunswick The Scarlet 
20 to 19, only to see Rutgers rip '" ™V League scoring with got a ticket allocation of 3,000 - 

off 12 unanswered points The a 17-polnt average. - about 200 more than Its own 

Knights took most of that Final statistics showed the gymnasium holds. Two weeks 
bulge into the dressing room personals were evenly divided ?*°< wh . e . n Rutgers played at 
with them, leading by 42-36 at between the two teams (22 for La(a y etle . >' received an 
meintermission Rutgere21forPrinceton)but allocation of 50 seats out of 

Coach Pete Carril s team, the officiating detracted m ore than 4,000 available 
plagued by fouls from the time considerably from the game „„. . „ TT- , 
the game was 10 minutes old, the players and the crowd had Officially, the contest was a 
battled back when action long been anticipating WeU Bi 8 7 game one in the con- 
resumed, although it never before the end of the first half fercnce that includes these 
quite managed to take the lead three starters on each team tw0 'earns, as well "- 
again But with 12:04 left in haT been withdrawn afte? Columbia, St. John's, 
£S g K ame ;'f!f Ti f ers 'railed being charged with three fouls o^m Manhattan and Seton 
only by a field goal, and began apiece Dabney Hollis Hal l No standings or scoring 
one of their polished stalls Copeland and Ed Jordan for statistics are seeing print this 
— Rutgers, Hill, Sowinski and winter ' but tne y wl " evolve as 

Steal. For Slaughter for Princeton Hill more & ames are scheduled 



Deluxe Barber Shop 

244 Nassau Street 

Haircutling and Styling 

For The Whole Family 

Closed Mondays 

924-5715 Open 8 (o I 



R. F.J0HNS0N 

El«drlcal 
Contractor and 
Fixture Showroom 



PRINCETON INDOOR RELAYS 

Jadwin Gym Sunday. February 8 

Featuring such major track powers as Villanova, 
Navy, Maryland and Seton Hall, this year's Indoor 
Relays figures to be one ot the East's premier win- 
ter meets The Held will include a number of poten- 
tial All-Amerlcans representing the above schools 
as well as Temple. Bucknell, Princeton and Pen- 
nsylvania. 



Held Events: 1 PM 
Track Events: 2 PM 



General Admission 1 
Student IDs '1 



Game Turns 
just over four minutes, Frank 
Sowinski, Bob Slaughter, Lon 
Ramati, Mickey Steuerer and 
Bill Omeltchenko ran the 
perimeter of the Rutgers 
defense and passed within the 
five-second time limit, 
showing no intention of taking 
a shot. Both Armond Hill and 



SPORTS 

In Princeton 






Barnes Hauptfuhrer were on Jordan and Copeland even- 
the bench with four personals, tually drew the limit 

and Carril had ordered the 

clock-killing project to get Able to stay out of foul 
them back into action with trouble despite constant 
less time remaining pushing tactics. Sellers was 

Had the Tigers gone from the dominant individual of the 
12:04 to 7:12 and then hit on a game, and gave ample 
field goal to create the desired evidence that he should go 
deadlock, the strategy would early in the NBA draft 
have been perfect It was split Although high man in the first 
asunder, however, by an adept half with a dozen points he 
steal perpetrated by Rutgers was no better than 4 for 11 
guard Mike Dabney, who from the floor and had missed 
peeled the ball away from two technicals called against _ 
Steuerer just after a pass from the Tiger coaching staff | 

Sowinski and went in for an In the final 20 minutes, he ■ 
uncontested layup hit on 5 of 7 and left the floor I 

The visitors' two seniors, with 22 points and 16 rebounds, ! 
Dabney and Phil Sellers, then the 'alter figure a Rutgers' | 
took near total responsibility record It was in this depar- ■ 
for leading their team onto tment that the losers suffered | 
safe ground From Dabney's most, the visitors coming | 
steal at 7:12 until just 1:40 down with 33 balls off the I 
remained, the pair hit for half boards to 17 forPrinceton. 

a dozen field goals and a pair 

of fouls between them Only a Tigers Outshot. Dabney's 18 I 
layup and a pair of free throws 8 ave this P air 40, more than Z 
by Sowinski countered the 14- half of Rutgers' total. The | 
point outburst for Rutgers Scarlet remedied 44 percent ■ 
and weli before Hill fouled out shooting in the first half with I 
with 1:39 to go, it was ap- 59 percent in the final 20 ■ 
parent that the biggest game minutes, to finish at 48. I 
in the six decades of the Princeton was 454646, but | 
rivalry would go to the managed only 46 shots from ■ 
Knights. the floor to 60 for the op- I 

For the defeated Tigers, position, 
there was little consolation II * a s the Tigers' fine foul | 
save awareness that they had shooting that kept them close. _ 
carried Rutgers a bit closer to They hit on their first 20 before | 
possible defeat than any of its Slaughter missed a ■ 
previous 16 opponents, and meaningless one in the final I 
that the victors' total of 75 was seconds, where Rutgers made | 
their lowest this season. The only 17 of 28. 
high-scoring New Brunswick Hauptfuhrer, 5 of 11 in the I 
quintet was averaging 98.8 field but 7 for 7 at the line, was 5 
points a game (second in the high for Princeton with 17. Hill I 
nation), had been in three and Sowinski followed with 14 _ 
figures on seven different apiece, Sowinski leading in | 
occasions, and had beaten its rebounds with 9 and HiD in ■ 
previous opponents by an assists with 8 
average margin of 25 7 points. Tne home team was ■ 
This was tops in the U.S. charged with two technicals, ■ 
the first setting a record when I 

Officials Take Charge. It Carril drew it just 33 seconds ■ 
was highly regrettable that af ter the opening tap-off. I 
the two officials, Larry Lembo Another against the Tigers _ 
and Austin Mac Arthur, followed before the half ended, I 
adopted the whistle-shrilling but Sellers missed them both. 



CLARIDGEWINE 
. & LIQUOR 

Wine and Champagne 

chilled while you wait 

in 3-5 minutes 

Princeton Shopping Center 

924-0657 - 924-5700 

FREE DELIVERY 






FAMILY NIGHT 

at 

JADWIN GYMNASIUM 

Enjoy Princeton University Basketball at $1 a 
seat. Bring the family (up to seven members In- 
cluding at least one adult and one child under 
16) to Jadwin Gym for: 

PRINCETON 

vs. 

CORNELL 

(The Tigers meet the Big Red) 

February 7 -8P.M. 

A Big Basketball 

Doubleheader For Just $1. 

A Real Family Bargain! 



j 

Your Old Typewriter 
Is Worth $100.00 

(regardless of Make, Condition, or Age!) 
Toward the purchase of 

ANY COMPACT ELECTRIC TYPEWRITER 

• FACIT 

Your Choice of OLIVETTI 

• SMITH-CORONA 

• CITIZEN 

Princeton 
Business Machines 

TYPEWRITERS 
COPYING MACHINES CALCULA TORS 
OFFICE FURNI TURE A DDING MA CHINES 




SALES 

SERVICE 

RENTALS 



policy they felt essential to TheRutgere star was charged 
overn the action that 



th one himself in the second ■ U.S. 1 , (Princeton Service Center), Princeton 

dlded. They erred with some bal'. Hauptfuhrer converting, I 

consistency on two counts - s ° the Tigers won that I 

calling fouls on very slight secondary contest, 1-0. /enO\ 091 1999 

contact, and failing to see ^OUi7j Jjfc I "«"' 

infractions of a very obvious Hurried Shots Hurt, m 

nature. Rutgers' all-court press •^■^■^■^■^■^■^■^■^^^■^^■^■^■^■^■^■^■^■^■l 



§ Tigers to Resume Ivy Title Chase This Weekend 
s With Eye on 14-and-0 Mark in Final Standings 



^ Unlike its schedule in most won, more than 20 since 

« recent years, Princeton now is Cornell finished on top, and Ivy League Basketball 

£* through playing independent neither Brown nor Harvard 

§ teams in basketball and for has ever captured an Ivy w L 

»= the final four weeks, will championship in the sport Princeton 4 

o concentrate on the traditional There is, temporarily at Co | umbia 3 1 

**■ round-robin within the Ivy least, sign of a renaissance at B 2 2 

3* League. Columbia and Cornell Columbia, where two good 
will come to Jadwin Friday freshman teams back to Back ™ nn 



■ .on 



Friday, February 6 

Columbia at Princeton 

Cornelia! Penn 

Brown at Harvard 

Yale at Dartmouth 

Saturday. February 7 

Cornell at Princeton 
Columbia at Penn 
Brown at Dartmouth 



J and Saturday nights, with the may carry the Lions back to Ya,e 
= Tigers finishing their regular first division by next year. Dartmouth 
j£ season on the road against this They are paced by a 6-6 Cornell 

: pair the first weekend in sophomore forward, Elmer Harvard 
~» March. Love, who has been the 

Z The only other jaunt away league's leading scorer in the 
c " from home is scheduled 10 early going with an average 
o days from now when Coach around 20 points. 
|» Pete Carril takes his title- Gene Bentz, a classmate, is 
c bound team to New Haven and ai so j n double figures for this 
£ Providence. Harvard and young Lion squad, highly 

, Dartmouth will be here unusual in that it will graduate 
g February 21 and 22 for return only one senior in the spring 
a games with the Orange and an d none at all the following 
o Black, with the home season ye ar. Eleven of its top dozen 
*Z ending the following weekend players are sophomores, 
j against Brown and Yale. Able to win a pair of close Yale at Harvard 

games from Cornell- one at 

*" For a variety of reasons, the Ithaca in double overtime- overtime. Their problem is 
Ivy League this winter is and then to trim Yale at New that outside the weak Ivy 
without at least two good Haven last Friday, the Lions League, they have been able 
teams for the first time in failed by two points to come to to beat only the likes of CCNY 

more than a decade. Penn, jadwin this weekend with a 4-0 and Kings Point. 

presumably the runner up in mar ^ j n ivy action equal to 

the final standings, is Princetons They were Cornell in Trouble. While 

currently below the 500 mark dropped by Brown at it has been five years since 

overall and has not only lost providence, 69-68- also in Columbia last won from 

its grip on the Ivy title butalso 

among a generally unim- 
pressive Big Five in 

Philadelphia 
Of the other six, only 

Dartmouth is currently above 

the break -even point. A factor 

in Ivy races for the past three 

years, Brown has again fallen 

on bad times and is mired with 

a 3-10 mark. Yale, Cornell and 

Harvard are equally mediocre 

with respective records of 4- 

14,4-11 and 5-10, and it is by no 

means surprising that with the 

league schedule less than a 

third over, no team save 

Princeton is undefeated. 

Recruiting the Problem. 

The difficulty at most of the 
Ivy colleges is the lack of a 
tradition of winning basket- 
ball and- particularly at New 
Haven and Cambridge - of 
modern facilities in which to 
play the sport. As a result, 
good players simply are not 
drawn there, 

Penn and Princeton have so 
dominated the Ivies in the past 
decade and a half that a lone 
Columbia victory < in 1968) 
marks the one season in the 
past 14 that either the Tigers 
or the Quakers have not 
finished first. It has been 
better than a decade and a 
half since Yale or Dartmouth 



Princeton, Cornell hasn'tdone 
so since 1968- the last season a 
Big Red quintet managed to 
play .500 ball. When Maynard 
Brown. Cornell's best player, 
made All-Ivy last season, he 
was the first from Ithaca to do 
so in almost a decade. 

A 5-9 junior, Bernie 
Vaughan, is the team's 
playmaker, pairing with a 
three-year starter. Abby 
Lucas, who joins Brown and 
Vaughan with a double-figure 
average. Save for its hockey 
and lacrosse teams, Cornell 
athletics are beset with 
problems ranging from 
frequent defeats to low 
morale, and the Red quintet 
will have its hands full staying 
out of the cellar in this sport. 

Facing 10 consecutive 
games against relatively low- 
calibre opposition, Princeton 
could, obviously, fall victim to 
an astonishing upset if it feels 
confident of claiming victory 
in return for showing up at 
game-time. The estimate 
here, however, is that the 
Tigers are too disciplined a 
team, and like to play good 
basketball too much, to fail to 
finish 14-and-O in the final 
standings. 




now in progress 

Harry Ballot Co. 



20 Nassau Since 1930 »«-<« 



Is Here!!! 

• FAMILIES WELCOME 

• TAKE OUT AVAILABLE 

• DRAFT BEER BY THE PITCHER 

OPEN: Mon-Thurs. 6p.m. - Midnight 
Fri. &Sat. 6p.m. -1a.m. 

ANDY'S TAVERN 

244 Alexander St. Princeton 




' Cordials & Liqueurs 

Glass Rental 

Ice Cubes 

VARSITY 
LIQUORS 

For Good Spirit! 

34 Nassau St (at Olden)- 

For Free Delivery Call 

924-0836 

CloMd Sindqr 
Opn Evary Day 
9 AM. u> 10 P.M. 



Avoid 

financial 

slopes. 

* - 

When you need an extra push to 

take the really big slopes in 

stride, being prepared can make 

all the difference between peaks 

and valleys. Let Dollar Bull help 

your finances to take off smoothly 

and bypass every obstacle by 

retrieving more interest on 

your savings 

7.90 

Effective annual yield on 

7 (fV ' - 

4 to 7 Year Celestial Certificates 

compounded continuously 

credited quarterly 

Minimum deposit $1 000 





certificates Anni 
when principal and il 
deposit lor a lull veai 



( Qfeai/ufu 
uw, 



OTHER CERTIFICATES AND PASSBOOK ACCOUNTS ALSO AVAILABLE 

IkFjEMEY twins 

^■^ ^|V 6 LOAN ASSOCIATION 



Princeton Shopping Center. 
Harrison Street (Southwest corner near the Acme) 
609-924-1700 
Accounts Insured to S40.000 by the Federal Savings & Loan Insurance Corporation 



Sports in Princeton 

TIGERS FACE HARVARD 
Friday in Baker Rink. A 

Harvard hockey team that is 
considerably sub-par in 
comparison to others that 
have represented the Crimson 
in the past decade will skate 
against Princeton Friday 
night in Baker Rink. The face- 
off will be at7:30. 

Given a decent defense, the 
Tigers would have a good 
chance of recording one of 
their rare triumphs on ice 
over the visitors, whom they 
last defeated in 1967. Their 
problem is that they began the 
week with the largest number 
of goals allowed in Division I 
of the 17 ECAC teams, their 14 
opponents having hit the 
Princeton cage a total of 89 
times for an astonishing 
average of 6.4 goals per game. 
When they manage just three 
of their own in six periods of 
play, as they did last week in 
one-sided losses to Cornell and 
Brown, they are rarely within 
reach by the time the final 
round begins. 

Victor in last winter's Ivy 
race for its first title since the 
mid-60s. Harvard has dropped 
two of its first three league 
games this season- to Penn 
and Brown, winning the return 
contest with the Bruins to keep 
them in the thick of a tight 
race. The Crimson has been a 
winner in only four of its first 



Harlem Globetrotters Here February 18 

The Harlem Globetrotters, the world's best known sports team 
will return to Princeton University's Jadwm Gymnasium (or a one- 
night stand on Wednesday, February 18. at 7:30 The Trotters' last 
appearance in Jadwin. on March 30. 1 974. produced a sellout crowd 
ot 7.550 

In reaching their 50th anniversary - a milestone fare in the annals 
of professional sport - the Globetrotters have continued to display 
their special brand of skill and humor Their most noteworthy recent 
appearance took place at the Attica (NY.) Correctional Facility, an 
event televised last month with Howard Coseil as master ol 
ceremonies 

Over the years, the Trotters have played before nearly 80 million 
people in 94 countries and their travels have logged over eight 
million miles The organization has played 12,325 games - 8,913 ot 
them m the United States and Canada and 3,41 2 m other foreign lan- 
ds 

In addition to competing against the New Jersey Reds basketball 
team, the Globetrotters will feature their traditional halftime variety 
acts, which this year include Robert Ashley and Craig Aurelto. two 
of the world's foremost table tennis performers. Salvador Murilloand 
Ulises Reyes, an act of balancing skills; and the Rebounders, a 
serio-comic trampoline act 

Tickets for the Jadwin Gym appearance are priced at $5, $4 and 
$3 and are on sale Monday through Friday between 9 and 2 in the 
mam lobby. Mail orders, including 50* handling charge, are also 
being accepted at P O Box 71 , Princeton 



Ivy League Hockey 




w 


Brown 


4 


Cornell 


4 


Penn 


3 


Dartmouth 


2 


Harvard 


1 


Princeton 


1 


Yale 






(Does not include Tuesday's 
Yale-Princeton game) 



Saturday, February 7 

Dartmouth at Cornell 
Penn at Brown 



nine games against Division I 
teams, and has yielded more 
goals than it has scored. 

Army, which has an easier 
schedule in Division II play 
and held an 8-2 mark after its 
first 10 games, will be here 
Tuesday night at 7:30. The 
Tigers' were in New Haven 
Tuesday of this week, hoping 
to trim Yale in league action 
after having dropped a 4-1 
non-Ivy game to the Elis last 
month. 

Cornell in Charge. In control 
of the action throughout the 
long evening, Cornell skated 
to an easy 7-2 triumph here 
last Wednesday. The losers' 
lone distinction was achieved 
by their ability to avoid the 
whitewashing that the 
Ithacans had administered to 
RPI and Yale, their two 
previous opponents. Defen- 
seman Al Rosner and forward 
Craig Dahl, both seniors, were 
credited with the Princeton 
goals, but the victors had 
opened the scoring early and 
the contest was never close In 
the final period, Cornell's 
shooting edge was a near- 
unbelievable 29 to 5. 

The third period was 
marred by frequent displays 
of ill temper on the part of the 
losers. Rick Friesz, a left 
wing, drew a five-minute 



iftftflfteaassaafleasfl iff ] 




\ Allen 

Edmonds 



Plain toe-lace boot with 
padded top for added 
comfort. ..full leather 

lining, plantation crepe 
sole. $50 




Palmer Square West, Princeton, New jersey 
Lfl ajLflJLB fl.fl fl fl 8 B.fl.B gBflfl.OflflflflgflflatttflO 



major for what appeared to be 
a deliberate charge that 
boarded Bob Hammers of 
Cornell, who was on the 
two or three minutes before 
heading for the dressing room. 
Friesz later was awarded a 
minor penalty that was 
capped by a 10-minute 
misconduct for a remark that 
one of the officials felt would 
have been better left unsaid. 

Goalie Robin Roliefstad was 
so incensed over attacks on his 
person that he drew two 
penalties for slashing within a 
space of 10 minutes toward the 
end of the game Such 
assessments against a goalie 
are a rarity, and coming back- 
to-back as they did, were in all 
likelihood unprecedented in 
the 54-year history of the 
ancient rink. 

At Providence Saturday 
afternoon, senior Gary 
O'Meara got the Orange and 
Black off in front with a first- 
period goal, but the home 
team Bruins got it back at 
19:57 of the same round. They 
went on to jam two more past 
Roliefstad in each of the 
remaining periods while 
holding the losers scoreless. 
The home team outshot the 
Tigers. 35 to 16. 

It was a 5-1 final, lowering 
the season's record to 2-11-1. 
As has been the case each 
winter for the past eight, the 
.500 mark is again heyond 
reach. 

THE WEEK THAT WAS 

For PHS Quintet. It was 
quite a week for the Princeton 
High School basketball team. 
A memorable week. 

Memorable because it 
defeated Ewing Friday, 58-55, 
in overtime for its first win 
over the Blue Devils in 10 
years. And quite a week 
because of earlier victories 
over West Windsor and Notre 
Dame The three wins in- 
creased the Little Tigers' 
record to 9-4 and earned them 
tenth ranking among all 
teams in the area. 

The Little Tigers have a 
chance to climb even higher if 
they can defeat fifth-ranked 
Hamilton (12-2) in their up- 
coming clash Friday night at8 
at Hamilton. Hamilton 
defeated PHS here earlier in 
the season, 56-49. 

Tuesday evening at 8, PHS 
will oppose Lawrence High 
School in the Cardinals' gym. 
Lawrence is suffering through 
one of its poorer seasons and is 
presently 3-9. 

Long Walt Over. "We didn't 
do anything special, we just 
played our game," com- 
mented PHS coach Marvin 
Trotman after the historic 
Ewing win. "We kept our 
composure We didn't get 
rattled when they came at us 
with the press. It was a good 
win for us." 

"I predicted it," thejubilant 
Trotman added. "I said we 
would be 3-0 at the end of the 
week." 

Few followers of PHS would 
have been as optimistic at the 
chances of beating Ewing on 



Indoor Relays Sunday 

More than 45 teams and 
close to 1,000 athletes will 
compete Sunday in Jadwin 
Gymnasium in the fifth 
annual Princeton Indoor 
Relays. A number of the 
top mile and distance 
medley units in the nation 
will be there for the meet. 

Both field and track 
events are scheduled, with 
the former starting at 1 and 
the runners an hour later. 
Princeton, Providence and 
Villanova are among the 
top entries in the distance 
medley, with Seton Hall 
and Dartmouth favored in 
the mile relay and Seton 
Hall also the favorite in the 
shuttle hurdle relays. 

In addition to Princeton, 
Seton Hall and Rutgers 
from this state, entries will 
come from Cornell, Dar- 
tmouth and Penn, among 
the Ivy colleges, Villanova 
Adelphi, Providence, 
Manhattan, Temple, 
Maryland, Army and 
Catholic University. 

Tickets are $2, with a $1 
price for students. 



i Endorsed as "Unique" by Princeton Historical 
Book, "The Place To Go" by Princeton Chamber 
o! Commerce. ' 

Hairstyling for Men and Women 
382 Nassau St ny appt 924-T733 



its home court, especially 
after a hot-shooting Ewing 
team had trounced PHS two 
weeks before on the Little 
Tigers' own court, 71-44. 

That time PHS had been 
tight and impatient. This time, 
Trotman explained, "we were 
more selective with our 
shots," The win was Prin- 
ceton's first over Ewing since 
a 79-74 victory in January 
1966. 

In that game, for PHS sport 
buffs, Wilbur "Scratchy" 
Hines hit for 23 points to put 
him within 85 points of 1,000 
(he made it) and junior Tom 
Wood, playing center on one of 
Tony Borzok's better teams, 
had a career high of 24. 

It was a team effort against 
Ewing Friday as five players 
scored all of Princeton's 
points and only six played 
Junior Oldham, Princeton's 
leading scorer with an 185 
average, led all players with 
25 points. He connected for 10 
points in the second period and 
then he and Felix Brown (14 
points) had clutch baskets to 
keep PHS ahead near the end. 

Dan Jones, Ewing's leading 
scorer with 22, sank a jumper 
with 2:19 to tie the game at 50 
and neither team was able to 
score again, although Shawn 
Craig, PHS captain, rimmed 
the basket with a 20-footer 
with two seconds left. 

Overtime Lead. In the 
overtime, Brown scored early 
and Oldham tapped in Ian 
White's missed snot to give 
PHS a 54-50 lead - its biggest 
margin of the game. Robbie 
McPherson sealed it with four 
pressure foul shots, the last 
with 12 seconds left. 

Ewing had jumped out to an 
early lead as it did in its first 
meeting, leading 15-9 on the 
shooting of Jones who had 
eight. But PHS rallied to go 
ahead early in the second 
quarter only to have Ewing 
run off six straight to take a 
27-24 halftime lead. 

Oldham and White, who had 
six of his eight points in the 
third period, brought PHS the 
lead again 44-42 at the start of 
the final period. Ewing's last 
lead, 46-44, came with six 
minutes to play. 

Unusual for PHS was it's 
winning margin at the foul line 
where it enjoyed a 12-9 edge - 
the actual margin of victory. 
"It was the best win I have 
ever had " said Trotman. 

West Windsor Falls. Earlier 
in the week, PHS had trouble 
against a stubborn West 
Windsor team which had won 
three in a row for its longest 
win streak in its short history. 

But the Little Tigers 
managed to prevail, 66-61, on 
the shooting of Oldham who 
had eight of Princeton's 16 
points in the final period 
before fouling out and the 18 
points of White - his high of 
the season. PHS trailed at the 
end of the first period, 16-13. 



84 LUMBER CO. 



Warehouse/Showroom 

Route 31 Pennington 

Phone 737-9084 



GRUMMAN 
CANOES 

ALL SIZES IN STOCK 



We also offer Old Town Fibreglass canoes. 
Moody trailers, British Seagull engines. Alcort 
Suntish and Minifish, also Starcraft Campers. 

Rutgers Gun & Boat Center 

127 Raman Avenue. Highland Park. N.J. 
(201)545-4344 

HOURS 10-9. Sal 9-5, Closed Weds 




Some folks 
just can't wait, 




For Sy I tan's 
Ice Breaker Sale! 

And you shouldn't either Because very special PRE SEASON PRICES make 
NOW the best time to buy your Sylvan Pool -THE AFFORDABLE POOL. And 
buying youi Sylvan Pool right now also guaianlees your family carefree 
swimming all summer long 
SWAN'S ICE BREAKER SALE ALLOWS YOU TO: 

• Plan Now —And take advantage ol the greatest savings tins year 

• Play Lalei —Enjoy family tun as soon as the weather ts warm this year 
and every year 

• And Sylvan has bank financing available, so yout lirst payment fin", doe 
until Spring 1 

So call now for more information —or better yel bring your lannly to the 
nearest Sylvan Pool Park and start planning your Sylvan Summer now 



SAVE $550 TO $1500— UNIP0UR CONCRETE POOLS 
SAVE $350 TO $750— INGR0UND VINYL POOLS 

Depending on size and accessories selected 



SYLMN 
POOLS 

World s Most Experienced Pool Builder 

CAU OR COM! SEE US 100AY 

FULL SIZE POOLS ON DISPLAY • OPEN 7 DAYS 

P001PARKS • SHOWROOMS • AND SUPPLY CEN1ERS 



Freehold. N.J. 6 Miles North ol Freehold Circle 536-1010 

(on Roule 9) 

Princeton, N.J. Princeton Shopping Center 921-6166 

(Supply Center Only) 

NJ TO LL FREE 8CO-5 23-6832 

Sylvan Pools, Rt. 611 , Doylestown. Pa. 18901 

Yes I want to start plannini my Sylvan Sraimermw Piw>e.«snm v fREE 

Pool Planning Guide without obligation D Col 

Phone ■ 

Address 

City State 1« 



(PTT72-5-7 6) I 



FIAT 

AND 

LANCIA 

Sales & Service 



All 76 Fiat models now 

in stock lor immediate 

delivery. 

A few 75 models still 

available at Big 

Savings. 




830 Rt 206. Princeton 
921-3500 



[autobahn motors 

Authorized Dealer for 



Volkswagen 




Mercedes-Benz 



< DepondaWe ati* 



jtTQ -t 3 Miles North 
!*J(3~A of Brunswick Circle 



.Soon* in Princeton f m j n Januar >' ,or a second 

JonlrrwMlromorKWnaO.o. game. 

1 Next Wednesday, the 

Oldham finished with 24 Panthers will play Montclair 

points. McPherson added 10 at home, and a week from this 

and Craig and Brown, 6 each. Thursday will face off against 

The loss was the Pirates' Princeton High. 

eighth in 13 starts. 

The previous day, PHS had The loss to Lawrenceville in 
upset ninth ranked Notre Lavino Fieldhouse Saturday 
Dame, 58-53. was as disappointing as the 

win over St. Anthony's was 

PRESSURE STIL1.0N sat, s fyjng This Princeton Day 
For PDS Basketball Team. leam nas achieved many 
The Princeton Day basketball "firsts" this year with a few 
team won a big one and lost a more st ,n possible, but one of 
big one last week, but there U | hem will not be the first 
no time to savor the victory victory over Lawrenceville in 
the one point win over St. basketball 
Anthony's High School or well prepared for the 
contemplate the loss to contest . the Panthers led most 
Lawrenceville. of the way for three quarters, 

-- against but ngve,. Dy very much. Bill 
:heduled Baggitt's 18 first-half points 

S'"™' . ke P< PDS in front both at *■ PDS FORWARD Bill 
"■"'.'"" whlte wl11 meel end of the first quarter and at Ban _|„ _„, , n - w i n nino 
Peddie at home at 8 pm thehalf 12-29 Baggitt got me winning 
Friday This will be the third ' basket In his team s one- 
game between the two; each p,. e58 Bothers Panthers, point win over St. An- 
has won one PDS defeated "if we could have handled the thony s, and then pum- 
Peddie in the final's of the press a little better in the pad In 27 points in the 
tournament before Christmas, sec0 nd quarter, we could have Panthers' loss to Law- 
but lost when it returned to the ope ned up a 10-point lead rencevllle Saturday. 
coacn Alan Taback com- 
.— — — M w^j mented. Overall, we played St. Anthony's Nipped. Last 
•■■ ■■■■■■■«■ we || for mree q Uar ters, then Wednesday, PDS just 
" we lost momentum." managed to slip by St. 
Baggitt, who finished as the Anthony's, 58-57, when Baggitt 
game's high scorer with 27 scored on a layup with 12 
points, got eight in the third seconds remaining in the 
period, as PDS took a 46-39 game. But, it took a shocking 
lead with 2:30 to play in the blunder by the Iron Mikes top 
quarter. Led by an old player, Joe Puhalski, to put 
nemisis, Tony Trani of the Panthers in a position to 
Princeton, who has helped win it. 
Hun beat the Panthers in past The home team had grabbed 
ears, Lawrenceville came the lead, 57-56, with just under 
ack and closed to within one two minutes to play, and when 
point by the quarter's end. Melville was called for 
The Larries continued their charging with 1:29 left, all it 
surge into the fourth quarter, had to do was run out the 
running the margin to 55-48 clock. This was being ac- 
PDS got to within four, 59-55, complished very smoothly 
but Trani hit on a three-point when suddenly with 35 seconds 
play shortly thereafter, and left Puhalski let fly a 20-foot 
the winners had a 65-55 ad- jump shot from the top of the 
vantage with about two key. 

minutes remaining. 

_ Lawrenceville gave away a PDS came down with the 

^T^^N 1- lot in height, but made up for it rebound with 31 seconds to 

WSgAM | with some fine shooting play, called time out and set 

■■VW I Tram was 11 for 19 Both u p the eventual winning 

«|f m coach Ed Megna and Taback basket "We were lucky to be 

^■r "agreed that Lawrencevilles ina position to win the game," 

m switch to a 2-1-2 defense from 

a 3-2 in the final period helped 

turn the game around. 

Baggitt, and Randy Melville, 

who hit for 18, did not get the 

inside shots, and PDS was 

forced to shoot from the 

wings. 

The victory was Lawren- 

eville's ninth against four 




B.M.W. 



Peugeot 



8834200 



admitted Taback, "but it 
makes me feel good to beat a 
fine Mercer County team. It's 
a big win for us and reflects 
how far we have come." 

The teams played evenly 
most of the way The Blue and 
White led by a point 11-10 at 
the quarter, but St. Anthony's 
pulled even by the in- 
termission at 24 all. PDS 
pulled away by four in the 
third period when Melville 
tallied 10 of his 17 points. 

Konstantynowicz had eight 
of his 14 points in the final 
period, and Billy Martin got 
the all-important assist on 
Baggitt's deciding basket. 
Baggitt ended with 14, while 
Martin and Mike Walters had 
six apiece. Taback went with 
five players the whole way. 

FUTURE IS BRIGHTER 
For Princeton Day Skaters. 
The Princeton Day hockey 
team is glad to have the month 
of January behind it. Out of 
nine games played, the 
Panthers could manage only 
two victories, leaving them 
with a 3-7 record before this 
Wednesday's contest. 
However, if they continue to 

filay as well as they did in a 
osing effort against 
Lawrenceville last Saturday, 
February should prove to be 
more successful. After the 
game scheduled against 
Chatham this Wednesday 
afternoon at home (replacing 
Seton Hall on the schedule) 
the Blue and White will have a 
rematch with Rye Country 
Day on Friday. PDS defeated 
Rye 8-1 in December. 

Other opponents include 
Wissahickon twice, and 
Peddie, again, which the 
Panthers also soundly 
defeated. So, the chances are 
there to improve considerably 
on the season's mark. 

PDS played some of its best 
hockey of the season in losing 
a see-saw battle to Lawren- 
ceville last Saturday at Lavino 
Rink. It could have gone either 
way, but it was the Larries 
that put in the winningjally 



losses, while PDS Tost only its 
second in 15 games. 



m /S^ s from N|nj 

We have available a large 
selection of 1 975 leftovers 

Valiants • Dusters • Cordobas 

Station Wagons • Hardtops 



SAVE UP TO $ 1 200 
OVER 76 PRICES 



NINI CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 

)9 State Rd. (Route 206) 924-3750 

MOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO? 



RE0N0R b RAINEAR 

Jeeo Sales-Service-Paif 

2615 So Broad Si 



MERCA- 
TANTI 



FORD 



Route 206 b Elizabeth St. 

Bordentown, N.J. 

2984990 

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 




BAVARIAN MOTOR 
WORKS 

GERMAN ENGINEERING 
AT ITS FINEST 




DATSUN SAVES 
OATSUM SETTS YOU FREE 

SALES • SERVICE • PARTS 



FRITZ'S 



1271-85 L STATIST. 

TRENTON, N J. 

PHONE 392-7079 




SE Wagon 



Motor Trend Magazine's 
"CAR OF THE YEAR" 

A new kind of small car you have to see! 



2-door • 4-door • Wagons 



SEE THEM ON DISPLAY NOW 

AT 

TURNEY MOTORS 

Dodge Sales & Service 
255 Nassau St., Princeton 924-5454 

"Serving Princeton Since 1938" 



Sports in Princeton 



with about five minutes 
remaining in the final period 

With the puck behind the 
PDS net, goalie Rich Olsson 
had his stick knocked out of 
his hands by a Lawrenceville 
player skating through the 
crease, and the home team 
managed to bring the puck 
around and score before he 
could retrieve it. The Pan- 
thers tried in vain for the tying 
marker in the closing minutes. 

Several Lead Changes. 
Prior to that, the lead had 
changed hands several times, 
with neither team able to get 
more than one goal ahead. 
Mark Zwadsky opened the 
scoring for PDS when he got a 
shorthanded goal midway 
through the first period. Still 
one man down, however, PDS 
got a little over enthusiastic 
about clearing the puck, and 
Lawrenceville tied the score 
less than a minute later on a 
four on two break. 

Later in the period Tim 
Brush intercepted a pass near 

thp t -,,.,•£,„„„, ,11~ rt„„l I 



the Lawrenceville goal and 



Flippin Mile Winner 
Royce Flippin, Princeton 
High School's outstanding 
miler, easily won the mile 
run in the third annual 
Mercer County Winter 
Track Championships 
Saturday in Lawrenceville 
School's Lavino 

Fieldhouse. 

Royce defeated runner- 
up Marty Egal of Hight- 
stown by 24 seconds with 
his time of 4:24.6. He was 
seeded first at 4:18. Last 
year, he won the two mile 
in the same meet with a 
record time of9:30.1. 

Friday, Royce moved 
into big-time racing when 
he competed in the Millrose 
Games High School Mile at 
Madison Square Garden 
He ran 4:20.1 to finish 
second behind Kevin Bryne 
of Paramus Catholic, who 
was clocked in4:18. 2. 



was 4-1 in the third period, week, returned and wrestled Toma (12-01) was pitted 

S^, ZWadSk> ' SCOred OT a "" a ,Jf e ,' 8ht at m He «- a 8 ainst lour-yeaV veteran 

counted for Princeton's only Dave Robinson. Princeton s 

other pin when he scored a fall top wrestler Robinson was 

PHS VS. LAWRENCE over JunDanner in 4:28 wrestling up a we°Xomh1s 

On Mat Wednesday. Coming Matt Wilkinson (101) got usual 129 pounds 
off a good showing against PHS started on the right foot Robinson scored the onlv 
strong HopeweU Valley Jast when ^ he ^ decisioned takedown in the open 

period 3nH mansflu' 

Toma di 



irong nopewen valley last "■'=" aecisioned takedown in 

;eek, the Princeton High Hopewell's Mike Morey, 7-2. period and managed to hold 

School wrestling team will try Both are freshmen. Steve Toma down for the rest of the 

to even its record Wednesday Ebersole (148) won again with period and half into the 

evening at the expense of a 3-1 decision over Steve second He seemed to be in 

visiting Lawrence High deDufour Jim O'Grady, PHS command. But Toma usine 

School Varsity matches will 158 pounder, battled Jeff his great strength and 

start at 8, preceded by junior Bur d. Mercer County Tour- balance, seemed to explode 

varsity matchesat6:30. nament champion, to a 2-2 and had Robinson in nn« 



MAZUR'S 
Discount 

Til 



nament champion, to 
Last week, before the start draw 
of the meet with Hopewell 
Valley, PHS 



nd had Robinson in o 
pinning combination after 
another throughout the rest of 
mo tuov.ii i um Loses in Final Seconds. In the match Toma ended with a 
wuiibj conceded that the add ition to Soderman's major 13-4 decision. 

Bulldogs probably were too 

Other Sports SEASON HALF OVEK 

r> a In Men's Tennis Leagues. 

On Page 19 The Saturday and Sunday 

men's doubles leagues at the 
"-inceton Indoor Tenn 




COLEMAN 
OIDSMOBILE Inc. 

"For those on the go!' 

Authorized 

Sales with Service 

• • • • 

Pick-up and Delivery 

Service for your 

Convenience 



883-2800 



Olden Ave. at Pfosnect St. 
Trenton, N.J. 



made it 2-1. Lawrenceville 
tied the score again near the 
end of the first period, and 
went ahead 3-2 at the begin- 
ning the second. 

Steve Judge brought the 
Panthers even with a fine solo 
effort for the PDS zone, out- 
skating three Lawrenceville 
players and slipping it by the 
Lawrenceville goalie. The 
Larries again got a one-goal 
advantage on a two on one 
break in the third period, but 
PDS made it 4-4 when John 
Haraldson intercepted a 
Lawrenceville clearing pass 
and fed Zwadsky for his 
second goal of the game. 

Coach Harry Rulon-Miller 
termed it the best played 
Lawrenceville-PDS game in a 
long while. Contests in past 
years had been marred by 
numerous penalties and bad 
feelings 

Last Wednesday, PDS 
suffered a considerably more 
frustrating loss to Hill, 4-2. 
The Panthers had 22 shots on 
goal to only eight for the 
winners "We had trouble 
finishing off our attacks, and 
did not get many repeated 
shots at their goalie," Rulon- 
Miller commented "We also 
had trouble passing ef- 
ficiently." 

Hill had a good first line 
which has accounted for about 
90 per cent of its goals this 
year, but not much after that. 
It got a two goal lead, before 
Jeb Burns put PDS on the 
scoreboard with a fine 
unassisted effort. The winners 
then scored two more and it 



strong for his team But .,.„ 
only three bouts remaining the 
Little Tigers were trailing 19- 
14 and had a chance to win. 

. match, there was another P rincel ° n Indoor Tennis 

That chance evaporated very close bout which could Lenter have reached the half- 

when Paul Soderman lost a have gone either way but way marl< of the ' r 32-week 

see-saw 8-6 decision to ended up as a decision for season 

Hopewell's Scott Needom at Hopewell. Dave Wilson '" " le Sat "rday League, the 

170 pounds and Hopewell's Princeton's fine 129-pounder [ leld is ? lose, y bunched with 

standout performer Rich was leading Hopewell's Dave Marty Birnbaum of Princeton 

deDufour followed with a pin Osborn in an exciting match Junct ' on enjoying a slight 

of John Hoover in 3:13 The when Osborn scored a ea « e °l et l - e0 0n > of Prin- 



rloover in 3:13 The when Osborn scored a ^ e over "o urzl of p 

-... -...i deDufour's 12th takedown with 10 seconds left ceton Tl «i 'or third place «■<; 

his last 13 matches. to grab a 6-5 win Carl Moore of Princeton and 

Nate Harris, PHS Joel Schulman (107) Eric Ken Har r isonof Plainsboro 
heavyweight, ended theTazelaar (115), and Karem ln tne Sunda y group, the 
evening by flattening Mark Heiba (141) all lost decisions ' TuaBer is Bob Miller of 
MignelTa in 3:27. Hopewell (7- Heiba dropping a major 134 Pr,nceton Junction Runner- 
3) won the match, 28-20. decision to Ken Verbevst "P„ ls , H ,°ward Kucks of Rocky 
,, , „ . ' Hill followed by last year's 

Peter Kahn, who had ^n.-ZT^^Z^ W^K, champion 'cart 

reportedly quit the team last H ope Iwefi™ i undefeated Andy °' Sen of East win "S0r. 



tffo Princeton 
Volkswagen Ltd.< 



Good Selection of Used Buses 
1969 thru 1973. Some with sun roots. 



75 Rabbit Demo's 
75 Beetle Demo's 
75 Scirocco Demo 
75 Porsche 91 4. 8,000 
miles, new car warranty, 
stereo, mag wheels, 
5-speed 

74 Dasher Wagon, 4- 
speed, stereo, air, roof- 
rack, 13,000 miles. SAVE 
74 Audi Fox, automatic, 
AM/FM, air 
1 974 VW Beetle, 
automatic 

74 VW Sun Bug con- 
vertible, 4-speed, 
AM/FM 

74 VW 412 station 
wagon, automatic, radio 
Jeep wrecker truck with 
Meyers snow plow. 
Power take off etc. 
Ready to go to work. 



74 Gold oun Bug 
Sun roof, special trim 
74VW412 2-Dr. Sedan 
4-Speed, air cond. 
74Datson610HT, 
AM/FM. auto, low miles 
73 Honda Civic. 
4-Speed AM/FM 
73 Toyota pick-up truck, 
bucket seats and camper 
cap. 

73 VW "Thing" 

72 Karmann Ghia coupe 

71 VW Pop Top Camper 

4-speed, fully equipped 

71 Volvo wagon, ' 

speed. AM radio. 

'69 Volvo wagon, < 

speed. AM/FM radio 

'69 TR-6, 4 speed. 

'69Fiat124Spyder. 

5 speed. 



We have an excellent selection of those 
hard-to-find Beetles - 1967 thru 1971, 



Route 206 • Princeton • 921 -2325 

Leasing Available 

Adjacent to Princeton Airport 





]ohnBurbidge]r. 

of Princeton 

formerly associated with 

Coleman Oldsmobile, Inc. 

in Trenton 

for the past 1 5 years 

is now 

General Manager 

of 

Eldridge Pontiac-Buick 

Route 206 in Princeton 



Opposite Princeton Airport 



921-2222 



POSTAL PATRON 



V ' CAN DIES 



Red Foil Heart 
1 lb. $3.75 




.. ' - '- -'• 






The 

Thome Pharmacy 

168 Nassau Street in Princeton 

E.E. Campbell, R.P. Dial 924-0077 

Free PRN Prescription Delivery Every Day & Holidays Free GIH Wrapping